Steam Machine By Digital Storm Will Cost You $1900

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Steam Machine By Digital Storm Will Cost You $1900

Bolt II

Digital Storm's first entry into the "Steam Machine" category isn't messing around.

PC manufacturer Digital Storm unveiled its first Steam Machine today, and it's a doozy. The Bolt II will boast liquid-cooled, factory-overclocked CPUs, high-end dedicated GPUs, removable brackets for easy upgrading and an "expertly engineered airflow design," all in a small form factor enclosure. It will ship with both Windows and Steam OS installed.

In case there's any question, this rig will not come cheap: It will be available in four customizable configurations that start - start - at $1899.00. "We (Digital Storm) are not looking to compete with console pricing," said Digital Storm Director of Product Development Rajeev Kuruppu. "We're taking aim at the high end of the market, targeting consumers that demand the best possible gaming experience and who are looking for a PC capable of playing any title on their new 4K display."

It's not the sort of thing you're likely to buy to play Minecraft, in other words, but with at least a dozen other manufacturers teaming up with Valve to build Steam Machines - Alienware, Falcon Northwest, iBuyPower, CyberPowerPC, Origin PC, Gigabyte, Materiel.net, Webhallen, Alternate, Next, Zotac and Scan Computers were all revealed today as partners on the project - consumers who don't have two large to blow on living room gaming will probably have at least a few more budget-conscious options to choose from.

Digital Storm's Bolt II will go on sale at the end of January.

UPDATE: Now with specs! Digital Storm was kind enough to provide us with some details and, well... wow. Hold on to your hats.

Graphics Card: Nvidia GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB
Processor: Intel Core i7 4770K
System Memory: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz
SSD: 120GB Corsair Neutron GTX
Storage: 1TB (7200 RPM) (64MB Cache)
Cooling: 240mm Radiator Liquid CPU Cooler
Motherboard: ASUS H87I-PLUS Power Supply: 500W Digital Storm Bolt II Edition
Optical Drive: DVD/CD 8x Multi-Drive
Warranty: Life-time Expert Care with 3 Year Limited Warranty

All that gaming hotness will set you back a whopping $2,584. Yowzah!

Sources: Joystiq, Engadget

Permalink

I must be missing something here, because to me this feels like paying 1157.76 for an OS.

PC included, of course.

So 'Steam Machine' is now the fashionable term for 'Gaming PC' right?

It's quite interesting to see the smaller dream machine builders like Falcon Northwest in there with the big box movers like Alienware and Scan, although I shudder to think how much a FW Steam Box is going to cost.

Certainly sir, that'll be five thousand dollars, the blood of three virgins and your mortal soul! Delivery time approx six week, ciao!

"We (Digital Storm) are not looking to compete with console pricing"

No shit! Honest, mister?

I want a new PC but I'm not paying over 1,000 for one! Bet it will sell like drug infused lava cakes though 'cos I know how much pc guys loves dem figures! "I'm running the most beautiful game on ultra settings at 120FPS!".

For me it doesn't matter, as long as games look better than minecraft and run at 30FPS I'm happy! (Yeah, I said 30!)

Wonder what kind of ridiculous markup it is to get that thing if it starts at $1900.

image

"1800$ ?!!? So much for PC gaming being affordable! herp derp"

And other such adorably ignorant comments...

That thing looks huge!
Isn't the whole point of steam machines to be compact pcs that ape consoles?

I would really ask you to reconsider if it's worth paying this much money for a thing you play games on without much other functionality and at the moment requires games to be streamed to be playable at all.

I mean videogames just aren't that important, there's so much else you could do with that money (like buy a console along with 20 games)

You'd need a games library the size of a house before steam sales start making you money back on that. If you really want to play games on a TV but refuse to buy a console, employ someone to carry your desktop back and forth for you. It'd probably be cheaper

Mr.Tea:
image

"1800$ ?!!? So much for PC gaming being affordable! herp derp"

And other such adorably ignorant comments...

Thing is though, for that price you could build your own high-end gaming PC and still have enough for a next-gen console. I think that's what people are getting at because that's damned expensive when compared to the model iBuy Pro Power has ($500).
This thing is basically an like Alienware, overpriced and you can get way cheaper to do just about as much. Doesn't help though that there are many people who don't know about the specs in PCs or don't understand what it all means. So then they believe that the more expensive it is, it must obviously have the best specs, which isn't always the case.

Mr.Tea:
image

"1800$ ?!!? So much for PC gaming being affordable! herp derp"

And other such adorably ignorant comments...

Well I don't know, we've had 7 comments and nobody but you seems to have brought that up.

Love the form factor. Can't imagine anyone who is getting this isn't going to drop Windows into it as well as keeping SteamOS.

pure built gaming PC is pretty much what i have if i hadn't taken the plunge into finally building my own PC, this might interests me :D

DTWolfwood:
Love the form factor. Can't imagine anyone who is getting this isn't going to drop Windows into it as well as keeping SteamOS.

pure built gaming PC is pretty much what i have if i hadn't taken the plunge into finally building my own PC, this might interests me :D

It does ship with SteamOS and Windows both, the article says.

In any case, I can't be the only one who sees this price point as not all that terrible, right?
Like, obviously those with the right knowledge and connections can do better on their own, but this is good shit for store bought.

At this point all of those high end specs on these Steam Machines is unneeded as the only games you can run on the OS must be Linux compatible. By extension these games are either Indie or Source based(From what I have gathered from their Linux games list) and not too intensive. The exception I have found so far is Brutal Legend but even that game came out a few years ago. I have yet to find something that wont run well on High settings on a SteamBox I threw together from spare parts and placed in a cardboard box. A 2nd gen i5 and an old 9600 GSO with 768 MB of VRAM seem to do the trick.

Okay... tell me again why I shouldn't build this myself for half the price or get BOTH a XBone and a PS4? Wait it has Windows 8 on it... you know that's not a selling point right? That just means I have to spend time cleaning that shitty OS from the HDD and replace it with Win 7... So deduct 100$ in value for having Win 8.

Then let's look at the specs... oh nobody has those except this site. Dvice.com says that the specs for the $2,584 Bolt II model will include an Intel Core i7 4770K processor, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti with 3GB of VRAM, 16GB of DDR3 RAM, 1TB hard drive, 120GB SSD, 8x DVD multi-drive, 250mm liquid CPU cooler and a 500W power supply.

Now that might not be accurate, seeing as it's only one site, but if that's the 2500$ version. Then the 1900$ one has got to be pathetic. I have a better PC right now for literally HALF the price of the 2500$ one. Why would I buy this and not a Steam OS CD or digital download or whatever? Sure it's decent for a store bought PC... but who the fuck games on PC and doesn't even know any rudimentary stuff about PC building? It's kind of like selling ice cubes to an Eskimo. We've got cheaper ways to get the same product...

I think anyone who was expecting the price to compete with built PCs is delusional.

That's odd. Just a month ago I think that same box had an estimated starting price of $1,469, not $1,900. I wonder what happened. Eh, a lot can change in a month.

So basically this manufacturer made a machine where your basically paying $2k to play things on Steam?

I know people will buy it. And that's honestly the sad part about it.

Neronium:
Thing is though, for that price you could build your own high-end gaming PC and still have enough for a next-gen console. I think that's what people are getting at because that's damned expensive when compared to the model iBuy Pro Power has ($500).
This thing is basically an like Alienware, overpriced and you can get way cheaper to do just about as much.

Of course, that's exactly what it is: High-end boutique PC has a high-end boutique price, no surprise there.

No reason to get turned off from buying a car just because a nice Mercedes can cost the same a several Honda Civics... =P

I38VWI:

DTWolfwood:
Love the form factor. Can't imagine anyone who is getting this isn't going to drop Windows into it as well as keeping SteamOS.

pure built gaming PC is pretty much what i have if i hadn't taken the plunge into finally building my own PC, this might interests me :D

It does ship with SteamOS and Windows both, the article says.

In any case, I can't be the only one who sees this price point as not all that terrible, right?
Like, obviously those with the right knowledge and connections can do better on their own, but this is good shit for store bought.

Nice. Didn't think it was all that expensive either if this really is high end.

loa:
That thing looks huge!
Isn't the whole point of steam machines to be compact pcs that ape consoles?

It's just the angle of the picture, it's actually pretty small, they've wasted no space in that Mini-ITX enclosure. That's why they've got liquid cooling; a decent fan just takes up too much room. It doesn't look that much bigger than the new consoles, which is impressive considering the large discrete graphics card.

700gpu
300-330 cpu
100 cooler
100 for mobo
PSU 50-150 (i couldn't find it)
120 ssd
60 for hd(probably)
180 for the ram (if corsair vengeance)

After case and optical drive your looking at 1800 bucks in HW for the low price of 2500+...

Dragonbums:
So basically this manufacturer made a machine where your basically paying $2k to play things on Steam?

No one said it only plays Steam games, it's a PC after all. The price seems about right to me for a pre-fab, parts plus labor.

Me55enger:
I must be missing something here, because to me this feels like paying 1157.76 for an OS.

PC included, of course.

Which is funny because the OS can be downloaded for free.

Clowndoe:
No one said it only plays Steam games, it's a PC after all. The price seems about right to me for a pre-fab, parts plus labor.

Around a thousand bucks for the job of putting a PC together? I'll pass.

Clowndoe:

Dragonbums:
So basically this manufacturer made a machine where your basically paying $2k to play things on Steam?

No one said it only plays Steam games, it's a PC after all. The price seems about right to me for a pre-fab, parts plus labor.

Also, I believe their website states "lifetime support" along with three years of "limited support", whatever that means. It sounds quite similar to what HP sells to business clients, their carepacks. The carepacks can cover a wide range of support requests, even down to limited overnight parts delivery, which in turn have to be installed by an official HP repair facility.

*EDIT* Oh right, and news about the $500-$700 CyberPower Steam Machine is hot off the press, although I've never been to "Legitreviews" before. And any site that feels the need to contain the word 'legit' makes me doubt their veracity frankly.

The real question is how much premium we're paying for this:

Price: $2584
Approx. price for parts at Newegg: $1800

Price at current exchange rate: 1700 inc. UK shipping
Approx. price for parts at Scan: 1300

I'm sorry but the specs make absolutely no fucking sense.

Motherboard: ASUS H87I-PLUS

That is a mini-ITX motherboard with zero room for expansion and no overclocking features...and they're putting an i7 4770K in it. Wrong wrong wrong.

Power Supply: 500W Digital Storm Bolt II Edition

That is cutting it VERY close to how much power those parts can crank up, with overclocking I'm pretty sure it would hit 100% load and fry unless it was gold-standard quality. Once again leaves you with zero expansion room.

Finally there's the price:

$2,584.

Conclusion: HUGE rip-off, do not buy.
Select parts individually from online stores and then build your own for around $800-1000 cheaper!

If people are that scared of assembling the computer, stores like CyberPower or iBuyPower can assemble it FOR YOU for less than $100 (including full warranty).

Alexander Kirby:
The real question is how much premium we're paying for this:

Price: $2584
Approx. price for parts at Newegg: $1800

Price at current exchange rate: 1700 inc. UK shipping
Approx. price for parts at Scan: 1300

Cowabungaa:

Me55enger:
I must be missing something here, because to me this feels like paying 1157.76 for an OS.

PC included, of course.

Which is funny because the OS can be downloaded for free.

Clowndoe:
No one said it only plays Steam games, it's a PC after all. The price seems about right to me for a pre-fab, parts plus labor.

Around a thousand bucks for the job of putting a PC together? I'll pass.

Some people don't want to put in the time and effort it takes to tune a machine for peak efficiency, especially if this comes factory-overclocked. It takes a fair amount of effort to get a good overclock; they don't just raise the clock speed, then raise the voltage if it fails to boot.

I honestly expected this version to have Titan with the best hardware you can stick into that case. But 2 grand for second-best or so... is Steam as a brand name worth that much?

Yuuki:
I'm sorry but the specs make absolutely no fucking sense.

Motherboard: ASUS H87I-PLUS

That is a mini-ITX motherboard with zero room for expansion and no overclocking features...and they're putting an i7 4770K in it. Wrong wrong wrong.

I'd like to say that the motherboard is actually very good and has all the features that a high end ATX board would, including overclocking. As for lack of expansion room, it's a small form factor. Remember that these are designed to be in the living room like consoles. Not many people have room for a full ATX size case under their TV. And yes, the PSU is gold standard, although I must admit 500W does seem to be cutting it close and they really are asking for a huge premium to build this for you.

BrotherRool:
I would really ask you to reconsider if it's worth paying this much money for a thing you play games on without much other functionality and at the moment requires games to be streamed to be playable at all.

Let's nip this in the bud:

Steam already has a sizable Linux Compatible section of Steam. The games in this section do not need to be streamed.

That's all.

OT: Wow. I wonder how many they'll sell at that price.

Auberon:
I honestly expected this version to have Titan with the best hardware you can stick into that case. But 2 grand for second-best or so... is Steam as a brand name worth that much?

Probably not, honestly.

These guys aren't doing anything that Alienware wasn't already doing.

Auberon:
I honestly expected this version to have Titan with the best hardware you can stick into that case.

Actually the Titan is no longer the best for gaming. The 780 Ti surpasses it in the vast majority of games and is the new king of single GPUs. It's cheaper too.

BrotherRool:
I would really ask you to reconsider if it's worth paying this much money for a thing you play games on without much other functionality and at the moment requires games to be streamed to be playable at all.

I mean videogames just aren't that important, there's so much else you could do with that money (like buy a console along with 20 games)

You'd need a games library the size of a house before steam sales start making you money back on that. If you really want to play games on a TV but refuse to buy a console, employ someone to carry your desktop back and forth for you. It'd probably be cheaper

Umm... it has Windows AND SteamOS installed on it,so you can use it pretty much like a normal PC in every way. And with specs like that, it will absolutely NOT require games to be streamed to it. It can easily run them on its own, althought it probably will support the streaming feature I guarantee it will not require it to work...

And since the console has windows built in as well, it will not be limited to only running Linux games.

That said I would never pay that much for this monster but I'm sure some will be interested.

UNHchabo:

Cowabungaa:
Around a thousand bucks for the job of putting a PC together? I'll pass.

Some people don't want to put in the time and effort it takes to tune a machine for peak efficiency, especially if this comes factory-overclocked. It takes a fair amount of effort to get a good overclock; they don't just raise the clock speed, then raise the voltage if it fails to boot.

Well, wait for something else, then. Getting someone to build your machine should NOT cost you that much. This Steam Machine is for bragging rights and not much else. There are other manufacturers, wait for them to put out something and see if their labor costs are less ludicrous.

The specs are rather shitty for the price point.
You could probably build it yourself for HALF... and then you could OC and save even more on parts.

Ridiculous rip off!!!

Auberon:
I honestly expected this version to have Titan with the best hardware you can stick into that case. But 2 grand for second-best or so... is Steam as a brand name worth that much?

You're a tad behind times. Titan is not a gaming card, it's a compute card disguised as a gaming card and it's main function was to make the 780 priced at $650 seem like a good deal. That phase has since passed.

Currently Titan has no place among R9-290, GTX780, R9-290X or 780 Ti as far as "gaming cards" go.

Alexander Kirby:

Yuuki:
I'm sorry but the specs make absolutely no fucking sense.

Motherboard: ASUS H87I-PLUS

That is a mini-ITX motherboard with zero room for expansion and no overclocking features...and they're putting an i7 4770K in it. Wrong wrong wrong.

I'd like to say that the motherboard is actually very good and has all the features that a high end ATX board would, including overclocking.

Umm if the 4-phase VRM and H87 chipset didn't make it obvious enough, it's far from "good" as far as mini-ITX boards go. Z87 is where the high-end performance and features are, it just doesn't make sense to use anything else with such powerful components.
Asus themselves have 2 mITX Z87 boards for high performance:

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Z87IPRO/
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/MAXIMUS_VI_IMPACT/

^ Now those are some awesome little mobo's worthy of an i7 4770K + 780 Ti rig.

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