Mars One Narrows Applicant Pool to 1058 Potential Colonists

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Mars One Narrows Applicant Pool to 1058 Potential Colonists

Mars One colony

Mars One will test 472 women and 586 men over the next two years in the hopes of producing 40 final candidates.

Whatever you may think of the prospects for space travel as a reality show, the Mars One project is certainly in it for the long haul. After opening its doors to public applications last April, the not-for-profit organization compiled over 200,000 resumes from individuals seeking a one-way trip to another world. When it wasn't securing suppliers for the upcoming mission, Mars One spent the subsequent year trimming that number to a far more reasonable sounding 1058 applicants. The selection process isn't finished yet however: Over the next two years, Mars One hopes to lower that figure further by putting the remaining candidates through physical and emotional tests, with an end goal of sending a final team to Mars by 2025.

"The next several selection phases in 2014 and 2015 will include rigorous simulations, many in team settings, with focus on testing the physical and emotional capabilities of our remaining candidates," said Mars One Chief Medical Officer Norbert Kraft. "We expect to begin understanding what is motivating our candidates to take this giant leap for humankind. This is where it really gets exciting for Mars One, our applicants, and the communities they're a part of."

The exact nature of the tests haven't yet been agreed upon, partly due "to ongoing negotiations with media companies for the rights to televise the selection process". That said, we do have some basic statistics about the remaining candidates. 472 women and 586 men from 107 countries were considered physically and mentally capable of making the journey to Mars. The majority of these applicants come from the United States and Canada, over half of whom are under the age of 35. That's not to say older candidates are being overlooked; 26 applicants are over the age of 56, the oldest of whom is 81 years old.

Assuming all goes well with its testing, Mars One hopes to separate 40 final candidates into teams that will train for an additional seven years. At that point, a global audience will vote for the team it wants on Mars for 2025.

Source: Mars One, via LA Times

Permalink

I still can't shake the feeling that this feel extremely unreal. Television rights? Launch in 2025? Man that's soon. And today I read that more than one person affiliated with established space exploration is sceptical about all of this from the right technology becoming available to simple money issues.

It almost feels like the Ouya console. Great idea but the execution...that's a gamble. And we know how that gamble paid off with the Ouya. Only here there's human lives at stake.

In 2025, that 81-year-old will be 94. I'd say he's out of the running.
Also, I can't believe that this is actually happening. These people seem far more interested in filming these colonists than they are sending them to ANOTHER PLANET.

Like most people, I'll be absolutely flabbergasted if this all goes off without a hitch. It just seems so surreal, so futuristic, and more importantly so bloody insane. But at the same time, the fact that people are dreaming about this, attempting to turn something like this into reality is at once inspiring and amazing.

Here's hoping for the 40 candidates that the people behind this have got more than dreams under their belt. Then again, the fact that people are signing up to the first one-way trip Mars entails that they probably have a death-wish, so eh.

Dear Mars One project.

I respect that you want to complete this mission under optimal conditions. Interplanetary colonization is a major step forward for our species and it deserves to be done right.

However I put it to you that to well and truly prove your dream a viable reality you need to accept that every society is going to have unprepared shiftless layabouts who have no business doing what they have been assigned to do.

For the good of all humanity I humbly offer my services to be this social x factor.

Love
D_M

They had my tentative support up until the part about the finalists being voted on by a global audience. That's not how you build any sort of project team, much less a groundbreaking mission to Mars.

So it's really just the big reality TV stunt that it's sounded like all along. Too bad.

Doesn't wanting to go disqualify you on psychological ground?
Or at least it should.
The idea still sounds a bit insane to me.
would i watch it? no doubt.

Given that this is a TV show, how will the video/audio feed be?
Ok,they have over 10 years to improve it.
But for now, even from orbit the resolution is low and there is a noticeable lag.

And why skip some steps to go to Mars right away?
Doing a moon base makes a hell of a lot more sense.
If the people manage to not die there, you can consider Mars.

This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

mattaui:
They had my tentative support up until the part about the finalists being voted on by a global audience. That's not how you build any sort of project team, much less a groundbreaking mission to Mars.

So it's really just the big reality TV stunt that it's sounded like all along. Too bad.

I agree, this shouldn't be a an episode of survivor. It should be the best candidates being picked.

I'm also concerned as to how those candidates are going to feel about their choice 11 years from now in 2025. A lot can happen in 11 years to make a person change their mind.

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Why not? at least it's representative of our current state as a species :S

"Lana, the penis to your vagina ratio around here is creepy enough already."

- Sterling 'The Duchess' Archer

Daaaah Whoosh:
In 2025, that 81-year-old will be 94. I'd say he's out of the running.
Also, I can't believe that this is actually happening. These people seem far more interested in filming these colonists than they are sending them to ANOTHER PLANET.

I don't know, if he holds out long enough he could be "first man to die on Mars", might be some publicity value in that.

they either all die, go insane and kill each other or never set one foot on it since it will be chancelled.

especially after reading this:

At that point, a global audience will vote for the team it wants on Mars for 2025

and since we all know how good an audience can choose intelligence and competence over charisma via television, we will send the equivallent of the jersey shore to mars.

come to think of it, either way its going to be a good thing sending them far from earth.

Diddy_Mao:
Dear Mars One project.

I respect that you want to complete this mission under optimal conditions. Interplanetary colonization is a major step forward for our species and it deserves to be done right.

However I put it to you that to well and truly prove your dream a viable reality you need to accept that every society is going to have unprepared shiftless layabouts who have no business doing what they have been assigned to do.

For the good of all humanity I humbly offer my services to be this social x factor.

Love
D_M

They've probably got that covered.

OT: Seriously, though, I am looking forward to seeing what this leads to. It's either going to be the latest greatest exploration of humanity or a calamity in the making.

>_>

<_<

Place your bets?

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Does it really matter how it happens? So long as it actually happens sometime in my lifetime I'll be thoroughly impressed.

The people who get sent will be there because of being voted there by an audience? That is ridiculous and a mockery of something so serious. Those people will never come back home. Everyone who goes should me meticulously chosen by a team of professionals, down the the very end.

It's really stupid and shameful to turn something this important to all of humanity into a reality show. Maybe they couldn't afford it otherwise, I dunno. Either way the concept disgusts me.

Its not gonna happen by 2025. I'll litterly eat my socks if it happens by then. Maybe by 2050, once Mars has already been settled a few times over.

Its not just a matter of money, its about technological achievements. NASA barely manages to land rovers on Mars, most nations can barely place satellites beyond the orbit of the moon, and these people think they can just host a reality TV show on Mars if they're well-funded?

Colonization of Mars is possible, but you need -amazing- technological expertise and experience, NASA-grade at the very least, and so much money that it could cover the annual budget of a small nation.

That's not to mention the colossal risk factor of all the things that could go wrong. Only the most crazy billionares and companies would even remotely consider sponsoring it, and even then even fewer would probably donate enough money for it to matter.

This isnt a project where you can cut corners or "maximize profits by minimizing spending". It isnt exactly cheap to build a spaceship capable of transporting colonists to Mars.
And most companies of the big-enough-size to matter as a sponsor take the risk factor in the highest regard. So yeah.

As for the voting procedure: Its a reality TV show. It barely tried to hide itself from being anything different. "Non-profit" my arse. The global population gets to vote on COLONISTS TO MARS! Rarely has a clearer case of media-based insanity existed.

Avaholic03:

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Does it really matter how it happens? So long as it actually happens sometime in my lifetime I'll be thoroughly impressed.

Yes, of course it matters. One of the defining moments of human history should not be a game show covered in mountain dew and doritos stickers.

Daaaah Whoosh:
In 2025, that 81-year-old will be 94.

*does maths*

Don't you mean they will be 92? 93 at the oldest depending on the dates.

I'm beginning to think this is an elaborate hoax for a reality TV show where they pretend to send people to Mars but they are really on a TV set and just mess with them. Like the Truman Show but on Mars.

Yeah. Whatever. THeir numbers do not work. THey are expecting to have better retunrning and more audience than the Olympics to pull this off. Not going to happen. Reduce it, do whatever you want. But this is won't work.

Nurb:

Avaholic03:

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Does it really matter how it happens? So long as it actually happens sometime in my lifetime I'll be thoroughly impressed.

Yes, of course it matters. One of the defining moments of human history should not be a game show covered in mountain dew and doritos stickers.

SHould it be covered in the colours of a nation made of arbitrary borders?

While I agree that it shouldn't be a coorporate sponsored thing, I don't see that to be much worse than having a flag associated with it. But then again I'm very anti-nationalistic.

Cowabungaa:
I still can't shake the feeling that this feel extremely unreal. Television rights? Launch in 2025? Man that's soon. And today I read that more than one person affiliated with established space exploration is sceptical about all of this from the right technology becoming available to simple money issues.

It almost feels like the Ouya console. Great idea but the execution...that's a gamble. And we know how that gamble paid off with the Ouya. Only here there's human lives at stake.

To be fair, this isn't really a gamble at all. A gamble implies that there is a chance of success. Either the people die during launch, transit or arrival, or they die on Mars. There isn't really a realistic situation where these guys come out winners. This whole project ISN'T an attempt at interplanetary colonization, it's a stunt.

Let's assume they actually make the trip safely (a trip of about seven months, assuming no one develops a better means of propulsion by 2025). 40 people is not enough to establish a viable colony. There is no growth and permanence here, just 40 people going off to a world that will be wholly inhospitable outside of the small, cramped living accommodations they will be able to setup on-site. Then there's the gravity. Martian surface gravity is about 30% that of Earth. We literally have no idea what sorts of long-term health effects living in that gravity will cause (the micro-gravity aboard the ISS can do some pretty terrible things to your body over time). Assuming some of them hook up with one another, we don't even know if human conception is even possible in such low gravity (not to mention the MASSIVE moral issues of bringing a baby into existence on what is effectively a suicide mission).

I don't think these people truly understand what they're getting themselves into. What a literal LIFETIME of being stuck in a series of cramped metal tubes with the same 40 schmucks is going to be like. Assuming a freak dust storm, or mechanical issue doesn't do them in. The only way this sort of thing works is if we are actually able to support it. Which means more trips to and from Mars to bring them new supplies (and the question of whether the people who were willing to fund landing humans on Mars will also be willing to fund the more mundane missions needed to keep those people alive).

That being said, space exploration and industry are VITAL to the future of the human race. Being able to capture asteroids or (with better propulsion) actually get to the asteroid belt to mine the really big ones directly would inject untold amounts of wealth and raw materials into Earth's industrial base. Which we could then use to fund fun projects, like a Martian outpost (honestly, I think an orbital habitat to serve traffic going to and from the Belt is much more reasonable. I don't think you could have people live on the ground without some sort of artificial gravity), or a Moon base, or trying to make a functional interstellar ship. We need to be thinking in long-term survival and enhancement of the species terms, not sending 40 yahoos to Mars for a glorified reality show.

Nurb:

Avaholic03:

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Does it really matter how it happens? So long as it actually happens sometime in my lifetime I'll be thoroughly impressed.

Yes, of course it matters. One of the defining moments of human history should not be a game show covered in mountain dew and doritos stickers.

How else do you expect to pay for such a project? Not that I think Mountain Dew or Doritos will be interested in sponsoring such a project anyhow. Besides, history very rarely remembers the means...only the ends. I'm sure TV stations showed advertisements before and after the moon landing but you never hear about that part of that historical event. Why would the Mars mission be any different?

Let's see...it cost $820 million US to put a robot on Mars back in 2003. Adjust for inflation and you're looking at about a billion to put the unmanned launch out by 2018.

That isn't the kind of money you just have lying around, I don't care how rich you are. So this business has to acquire a billion bucks, and THEN acquire all the additional funds needed to train its would-be astronauts, the organizing of all the media insanity they have planned, and actually paying for the manned flight to leave the ground. Those rockets could have more logos on them than NASCAR vehicles and they wouldn't begin to touch the kind of cash needed.

Finally, remember that there are people running this dog and pony show. By the time 2018 rolls around, I think there should be a nice tasty scandal regarding a bit of embezzlement or fraud and this will all blow away like so much methane in the wind, giving everyone a good laugh and a head-shake before we flip the channel back to Superbowl LII.

Tomeran:
Its not gonna happen by 2025. I'll litterly eat my socks if it happens by then. Maybe by 2050, once Mars has already been settled a few times over.

Its not just a matter of money, its about technological achievements. NASA barely manages to land rovers on Mars, most nations can barely place satellites beyond the orbit of the moon, and these people think they can just host a reality TV show on Mars if they're well-funded?

Colonization of Mars is possible, but you need -amazing- technological expertise and experience, NASA-grade at the very least, and so much money that it could cover the annual budget of a small nation.

What do you really need to settle on a planet like Mars? Ability to process and recycle oxygen and water from the soil...that's existing technology. Ability to grow plants there...not actually that difficult. Ability to generate power...simple. Protection from the environment (namely wind storms and radiation)...I think they've got that figured out. Honestly, I can't think of a single technology that would be needed that doesn't already exist. The most limiting factor would be the people involved...whether they could handle the trip and getting the colony up and running. And then you'll need a plan to re-supply the colony down the road, because even well-engineered things break down eventually.

I think a lot of people over-estimate "NASA-grade" technology. NASA, along with United Launch Alliance who provides pretty much all launch services for the US now, don't exactly corner the market on cutting-edge technology. Most rocket technology is adapted from ICBMs and hasn't really advanced in 50 years (case in point, the RL10 second stage engine used by all ULA launch vehicles originally flew in 1961). They've held onto old technology and processes so long, it's no wonder a company like SpaceX can do what ULA does for a fraction of the cost. Time for the old dinosaurs to step aside and let leaner private industry take over.

Nurb:

Avaholic03:

Nurb:
This has to fail... the NEEDS to fail. We can't have the first human presence on another planet be a reality show and corporate sponsors!

It's an absolutely disgusting thought.

Does it really matter how it happens? So long as it actually happens sometime in my lifetime I'll be thoroughly impressed.

Yes, of course it matters. One of the defining moments of human history should not be a game show covered in mountain dew and doritos stickers.

I'd prefer a mars landing with Doritos and Jersey Shore, then no mars landing at all. Governments have given up on space, time for the private industry to give it a chance.

However, I don't know where they're going to get the budget to put enough shielding into orbit so that the crew doesn't get cooked in the long journey, it would take I'm guessing at very least 3 Saturn 5 rockets (or whatever they're calling the modern equivalent that carries basically "Spruced up Saturn 5 engines") to put enough shielding into orbit. Those things do not come cheap. It's a large part of why NASA keep talking of reaching a near-earth asteroid or build a moonbase first, because it's much easier to build a shield from material there.

I was gonna apply a while back, but I was too tall. :(
Still, as a few others here, I don't have much trust in this project. Was unaware of the TV bullshit.

Let's hope this is such a fiasco that it turns humanity away from, the waste of precious resources that is, space exploration for a good, long while.

FalloutJack:

Diddy_Mao:
Dear Mars One project.

I respect that you want to complete this mission under optimal conditions. Interplanetary colonization is a major step forward for our species and it deserves to be done right.

However I put it to you that to well and truly prove your dream a viable reality you need to accept that every society is going to have unprepared shiftless layabouts who have no business doing what they have been assigned to do.

For the good of all humanity I humbly offer my services to be this social x factor.

Love
D_M

They've probably got that covered.

OT: Seriously, though, I am looking forward to seeing what this leads to. It's either going to be the latest greatest exploration of humanity or a calamity in the making.

>_>

<_<

Place your bets?

The fun part is that it will be great television and a lot of money in any case!

No, if this is just some cover for reality TV, I don't want anything to do with it. I'd rather it be a documentary, not some cheap excuse for some corporations to make money for people risking their asses on the red planet.

BanicRhys:
Let's hope this is such a fiasco that it turns humanity away from, the waste of precious resources that is, space exploration for a good, long while.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WofqmWpXJZ8
for you :)

Anyway, i wanted to participate in such process, but my first shrink presented me with this scenario: there is 5 people tied into a rail and a train is gonna kill them, and youre above the rails in a bridge and theres a fat guy near you, if you throw the fat guy in the rails the train will derail and you will save those 5 persons, what would you do??
It turns out that "yes, i would push the fat guy, but only if the train is not loaded with more people" is the wrong answer :( so im psychologically incapable of space traveling... and many other activities.

Also the idea of televising this seems stupid to me, and theres no details on how would a colony work in Mars, the only possible way that a colonist mission is held in 2025 is if the third world war starts in the next 2 years, and the mission is held during a second space-age boom in an hypothetical 2025 post-war scenario... Because you know the only reason to make such breakthroughs in human history is for a country to show how his dick is bigger than the competence ;)

BanicRhys:
Let's hope this is such a fiasco that it turns humanity away from, the waste of precious resources that is, space exploration for a good, long while.

You might be trolling, but hell I have to say it. SPace exploration is not a waste of resources. It is a valuable and very important industry, which has not only produced very interesting side technologies but has helped us understand better our own planet (the ozone layer depeltion was a result of planetary exploration). So please stop talking about things you clearly haven't studied enough,

Cowabungaa:
I still can't shake the feeling that this feel extremely unreal. Television rights? Launch in 2025? Man that's soon. And today I read that more than one person affiliated with established space exploration is sceptical about all of this from the right technology becoming available to simple money issues.

It reminds me of Space Cadets:

Man, that show was awesome.

I think everyone is forgetting something about the whole audience voting aspect. The audience members aren't just voting for anyone who applies, they're voting from a select pool of candidates, specifically chosen by the Mars One Team for their qualifications. So no, we aren't gonna get some McDonalds fry cook on the mission, it will most likely be a competition between the most highly qualified individuals who signed up.

kurokotetsu:

BanicRhys:
Let's hope this is such a fiasco that it turns humanity away from, the waste of precious resources that is, space exploration for a good, long while.

You might be trolling, but hell I have to say it. SPace exploration is not a waste of resources. It is a valuable and very important industry, which has not only produced very interesting side technologies but has helped us understand better our own planet (the ozone layer depeltion was a result of planetary exploration). So please stop talking about things you clearly haven't studied enough,

I used to think that research into space exploration was a necessity, the reason I now believe the contrary is because of the research I've done on the subject.

This being the Internet, I'm not going to bother typing up some massive essay to reinforce my opinion because, odds are, my effort will be entirely wasted. But if you think you haven't given both sides of the discussion ample attention and you would like to, information regarding the wastefulness of space exploration is readily available to you.

Just please, just don't assume I'm ignorant on the matter because my opinion differs to yours.

What do you really need to settle on a planet like Mars? Ability to process and recycle oxygen and water from the soil...that's existing technology. Ability to grow plants there...not actually that difficult. Ability to generate power...simple. Protection from the environment (namely wind storms and radiation)...I think they've got that figured out. Honestly, I can't think of a single technology that would be needed that doesn't already exist. The most limiting factor would be the people involved...whether they could handle the trip and getting the colony up and running. And then you'll need a plan to re-supply the colony down the road, because even well-engineered things break down eventually.

You left out that tiny little crucial bit: The ability to get there and land with a big spacecraft capable of transporting a relativly large crew. This is a mission that would be ten times as complicated as landing on the moon, and probably twenty times as expensive. This alone is a MASSIVE technological and financial hurdle. If it was cheap and easy, it would've been done already. NASA recently pulled it off with a rover about the size of a car, a rover that was -incredibly- expensive, and that alone was celebrated as one of the greatest scientific achievements of the last decade.

Setting down and building a colony there is fully possible, I never denied that. But it is by no means as easy as you make it sound. The technology is existing, but that doesnt mean its easy or cheap to put it into place. The radiation protection in particular is quite the challenge, not to mention the colossal dust storms that take place on Mars.

I think a lot of people over-estimate "NASA-grade" technology. NASA, along with United Launch Alliance who provides pretty much all launch services for the US now, don't exactly corner the market on cutting-edge technology. Most rocket technology is adapted from ICBMs and hasn't really advanced in 50 years (case in point, the RL10 second stage engine used by all ULA launch vehicles originally flew in 1961). They've held onto old technology and processes so long, it's no wonder a company like SpaceX can do what ULA does for a fraction of the cost. Time for the old dinosaurs to step aside and let leaner private industry take over.

A fair few things may be overrated about NASA, but their experience in the field is not one of them. They have more of it then any other lasting space agency, with the possible exception of the FKA(or RKA. The russians, that is), and they definetly have more expertise then any other when it comes to MARS.

NASA technology is reliant on private contractors, some of which are now big actors by themselves, but they're custom-tailored in cooperation with NASA as a result of their experience and expertise. It isnt about "cornering the market" or market shares or just technology, its about the knowledge.

SpaceX is a grand example of private contractors doing what NASA could do, but there's a COLOSSAL difference between managing to launch a rocket into space and sending a supply capsule to the ISS, compared to launching a MANNED MISSION TO MARS. The difference in terms of what you need both in tech, skills, experience, money and planning is...well, I'd have to ironicly have to compare it to astronomical measurement units, but you get the point.

NASA may be "old dinosaurs", but just because the private space industry is on "the march" forward, which perhaps is quite the good thing seeing the unfortunate decrease in interest from goverments to spend money on space exploitation(a huge mistake), doesnt mean that its ready to SURPASS them, especielly in terms of knowledge and experience. It is important to remember that NASA still has a fair degree of cooperation with most of these succesful "private" space ventures, but that they'd never even dream of supporting something as stupid as a reality TV show on Mars.

NASA is here to stay, they wont be going anywhere, not for a reaaally long time, and they're still the unquestionable champions when it comes to space exploration. Reducing their budget may have limited what they can do, but it doesnt mean they have ceased to exist.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Registered for a free account here