X-Ray Glasses Allow Doctors and Nurses to Pinpoint A Patient's Veins

X-Ray Glasses Allow Doctors and Nurses to Pinpoint A Patient's Veins

The Eyes-On Glasses, created by Evena, let a caregiver look right through a person's skin to find the best spot for an injection.

Among the new gadgets on display at CES this week was a pair of x-ray glasses designed to help nurses and doctors see right under a person's skin. The Eyes-On Glasses, designed by Evena, allow the medical staff to clearly see a person's veins without the need of extra devices and help from other medical staff. The image seen by the wearer of the glasses can then be shown on a connected tablet, which also displays the patient's vitals. The glasses also have internal memory to document photos and videos and can transmit video images to other devices via 3G, bluetooth or wi-fi networks.

The Eyes-On Glasses are designed to work wirelessly, and make use of a belt-mounted computer to reduce the weight of the device. They can also detect any leakages from IVs hooked up to the patient, which can prevent the chemicals from escaping into other parts of the body and damaging tissue. The Eyes-On Glasses go into mass production this April, selling for a cost of about $10,000.

Source: Evena via Among Tech

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Oh, hey future didn't expect to see you so soon...
This looks like it could have tons of applications across a number of fields.

I suspect Russell Brand will buy a pair.

While these could be very helpful for interns and such, knowing how to do this by instinct is still important for the times when you don't have fancy glasses to help you, especially at 10 grand a pop.

This is never going to be used for injections, unless it's into a person's brain, it's far too costly, the only reason you would need one of these is if you are doing something very delicate and very risky.

Oh look, something for the high class heroin users. Yeah til the price goes down I don't think you'll be seeing many hospitals with that. Wait scratch that. Its $10,000 so yeah of course they'll buy like 30 of those so they can justify charging more for seeing you at the hospital. After all someone's gotta pay for that equipment.

I'm curious as to how this works... because we all know X-Rays aren't involved, right? The video says it uses multi-spectral lighting... but I don't quite know how you use multi-spectral lighting to do that... not that I'm a light scientist, I'm not!

Welp. I just discovered a new thing that I am squeamish about. Ended up sideways in my seat and assumed a fetal position.

They'll find out that underneath my clothes...I am naked! Bwa ha ha ha ha ha haaa!!!

Is there a budget model that merely goes through fabric as well? I could really use one of those for...uh...security checks! That's totally what I'd use them for...

Awesome tech, though the the thing that stood out to me first and foremost:

"Accurate AND precise"? Hrrrmmmm i don't really think you can have precision without accuracy... superfluously redundant because you have to have three things in a list.. not two.

Anyways

amaranth_dru:
Oh look, something for the high class heroin users. Yeah til the price goes down I don't think you'll be seeing many hospitals with that. Wait scratch that. Its $10,000 so yeah of course they'll buy like 30 of those so they can justify charging more for seeing you at the hospital. After all someone's gotta pay for that equipment.

Not all countries require people to pay extortionists rates for medical care.

Sorry, but the US medical system appears barbaric at best to people in other countries that get at least for the most part free medical care. I can see Australian hospitals appropriating this tech quite quickly

Baresark:
I'm curious as to how this works... because we all know X-Rays aren't involved, right? The video says it uses multi-spectral lighting... but I don't quite know how you use multi-spectral lighting to do that... not that I'm a light scientist, I'm not!

My guess here is that it uses UV to IR to create a high contrast black and white image of the veins. The various frequencies show different things and when processed they show the veins.

FalloutJack:
They'll find out that underneath my clothes...I am naked! Bwa ha ha ha ha ha haaa!!!

You too?

Oh, thank god; I thought there was something wrong with me.

Wow... First Oculus rift, then flying delivery drones and now this?
Seems like reality really is starting to get more and more sci-fi like.
This seems really cool.

What's next? Holographic displays?
Personal A.I.s?

Chaosritter:
Is there a budget model that merely goes through fabric as well? I could really use one of those for...uh...security checks! That's totally what I'd use them for...

Damn you! You beat me to it in terms of being creepy and kinda sleazy!

OT: Huh, so they finally made x-ray spec's that work and aren't just cheap cardboard? Awesome! :D

Glad to see science is making stuff that's awesome everyday.

Chaosritter:
Is there a budget model that merely goes through fabric as well? I could really use one of those for...uh...security checks! That's totally what I'd use them for...

Only available for TSA officers.

This is a pretty neat thing. I myself have never had problems hitting any veins (am I a junkie, a doctor, a syringe using hitman or an alien that just really loves probing you choose!) but I have seen people struggle for hours with it. One time a nurse failed to find any veins and had to stick me in the wrist, the most painful and unpleasant sensation I've ever felt, it's like there's a needle in between your joints being ground around with every small muscle twitch.

If that becomes a thing of the past then I am all for subsidizing these things. It also makes the nurses look like sexy future nurses so that's also a big plus point.

$10,000 is far too much money when you can do the same job (finding a vein) with about 15 seconds of feeling around and mark the spot with a sharpie. Still, this is an interesting piece of tech, and I hope to see something like it integrated into surgical machines of the near future.

This would be VERY useful for taking blood from my sister, because you can only find the one tiny ribbon-vein that shifts around in her arm by poking her a couple dozen times as she screams her heart out all the way.

Very cool, yeah this is expensive for now, but over time the costs will drop the product will improve and the uses will be increased. This type of tech could be so useful in disaster situations, if nurses or doctors can get an idea of what is going on in a person's body they will be able to prioritize patients faster and easier. Time will only make this better also it's really cool stuff.

My mind immediately went to bad pickup lines for these things.

"Evening. How's the party going?"

"I can see your bloooood."

One of my doctors when I ripped my hand open could have used that. She had 4 attempts to hit the vain and she managed to miss every single of them. The nurse managed to do it on the first try

A nurse will never have to use that with me. I always get complimented on my veins.

Good. Maybe now those incompetents at the hospital can find the correct vein on the first try, instead of the fourth.

Ah, well. Progress!

Some patients have extremely unusual veins and gaining access to them can be very, very difficult. I saw a patient who had to endure repeated attempts at insertion from multiple health care workers, due to the fact that his veins were somehow unusually difficult to access. These glasses may help in those cases.

WWmelb:
Awesome tech, though the the thing that stood out to me first and foremost:

"Accurate AND precise"? Hrrrmmmm i don't really think you can have precision without accuracy... superfluously redundant because you have to have three things in a list.. not two.

In science those are two different things. Not sure about the semantics of it though...

Accuracy: being able to 'hit' the target as close to as we want. Making the measured error as small as possible.

Precision: even if there is an error. It will always be more or less the same.

Example: you want to measure an electric current. It is in fact 15.239mA.
Scenario A: you measure four times. 15.3,15.4,15.2 and 15.1 your measuring tool is accurate but not precise.

Scenario B: you measure 15.5, 15.5, 15.6 and 15.5 your measuring tool is precise but not accurate.

Scenario C: you measure 15.2, 15.2, 15.2 15.3 your measuring tool is both precise and accurate.

OT: I doubt they use xrays. And eventhough its a neat gimmick. I doubt they are going to give it to nurses for injections... Way to expensive

This Reminds me of a similar piece of technology that used ultrasound to properly place guided needles for IV fluids and such.
http://somaaccesssystems.com/axotrack_overview.php
Both are pretty cool pieces of technology, not sure how the price would compare between the two, but 10k actually sounds like a pretty good deal, assuming they don't break every other month.

 

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