Steam Machine Maker Says Other Companies "Just Don't Get It"

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Steam Machine Maker Says Other Companies "Just Don't Get It"

SBX Steam Machine

The marketing manager of iBuyPower says companies making high-end Steam Machines are missing the point of Valve's living room gambit.

Despite initial expectations that the Steam Machine would be a fairly standardized, console-like system, there are actually an awful lot of designs and price points in the pipe, which is perhaps not terribly surprising given that 14 different companies have signed up to build them. Entry into the club will come as low as $500, but gamers with extra-deep pockets and a burning need to be on the bleeding edge will be able to drop as much as six grand on one.

The question on a lot of minds following the Steam Machines reveal was how exactly they will be different from a conventional gaming PC. Ricky Lee, the marketing manager at iBuyPower, explained that in order to sell a PC with a preinstalled version of Steam or SteamOS, manufacturers must acquire a license from Valve and bundle a Steam controller with it. He said his company could ship the SBX Steam Machine it revealed at CES next month, but when it will actually be able to go out the door "depends on Valve."

He also made the very interesting observation that builders going to the high end of the price range, like Falcon Northwest and Digital Storm, "just don't get it." Like it or not, Steam Machines will have to compete with consoles if Valve wants to make inroads into the living room, and for an awful lot of consumers that means a price point that's at least remotely console-like.

It's a valid point. Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it. But it also reveals that even among the people who are making them, there's no consensus on what the actual intent is - if there even is some specific "goal" at all.

Source: SlashGear

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Andy Chalk:
Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it.

At least someone gets it. Been thinking this every time we hear about another steam machine in the 4 digit price range.

So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

It's the "I'm not decided on next gen, and I've heard nifty things about PC and Steam, but I do not know enough about PC Gaming to know what I should get, and I don't want to be swindled by store clerks trying to sell me a shitty celeron laptop".

It's not that sizeable, but it's still the first generation of steam machines, so they are most likely here just to test the waters.

The second generation is when we will see if Valve's gambit has/can pay off.

Also, iBuyPower looks like the only company who gets it, because they hit that $500 mark, which is within reaching distance of console prices, and it might end up being powerful(if they believe in Steam Machines and sell at a slight loss).

Ah iBuyPower, you make me glad that my desktop has parts made from you. :3
Seriously, the point of the Steambox was basically to give an affordable PC with the Steam OS to help get others into PC gaming. The iBuyPower model of the Steam Box is reasonably priced for what it is, but the others are basically doing what Alienware does and charging ludicrous prices for something that's way cheaper to build yourself.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

As far as I can tell it doesn't run only Steam. It's that it has the SteamOS pre-loaded and undoubtedly has Steam preinstalled too, but is otherwise a Linux PC that you can put anything else on. Unless I've misunderstood.

The Wykydtron:
I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

The obvious market niche is the hardcore gamer that's grown up and taken on adult responsibilities and relationships. They can't reasonably justify an extra big HD monitor for their gaming habit on the PC, but neither can they justify leaving their multi-purpose, quality PC connected to the family's TV because the kids need to do their homework on it, and it gets used for looking up recipes or the like while the family watches TV. Plus, if there's more than one gamer in the family, sharing the game experience is also valuable, and let's be honest, most PC setups are not of the living room aesthetic variety.

Enter the Steambox. Make it cheap enough, single purpose enough, and, just as importantly, TV-console friendly enough, and now you've got a perfect box to hook up to the TV and leave there so that you can play all the cool games that you just aren't able to get on the regular console, not to mention access the massive library you've built up through steam sales and humble bundle deals.

This also ties in great to their new Friends and Family Accounts system. Mom can go upstairs and play Prototype in the family's steam account while knowing the kids downstairs on the Steambox are using the same account, but can't play any of the gory games like that one.

Valve shot itself in the foot by allowing multiple Steam Machines to enter the market.

The appeal of console gaming is that a person can very easily pick up a game, put it in his console of choice and be sure it will work. The games are developed specifically for those consoles. With PC gaming, you don't always have that type of assurance. Games may require drivers or patches to get them to run butter-smooth. The Steam Machine was supposed to offer the advantages of Consoles while maintaining the advantages of PC gaming.

With 18 or whatever of these Steam Machines, each one offering vastly different performance at even more vastly different prices, we're back at square one. If the point of having a specialized PC is to introduce people to the advantages of PC gaming while providing the plug-and-play ease of a console, then having 18 different choices is going to undermine that concept a little bit. It also doesn't seem to help developers that much. One of the advantages of console gaming is that the developers are developing for one piece of hardware. They don't need to make sure their games work for every PC ever built. While that is not a possibility for PC gaming anytime soon, games can at least be optimized and guaranteed to work is there was a single common unit to work with. With 18, though, why bother?

What Valve could do to fix this problem they've created is label a specific Steam Machine (most likely the iBuyPower) as the "official" Steam Machine. While it's not as good as only having one Steam Machine, it can be a good psuedo-standard upon which developers optimize the code of their games for, and for retailers to market to consumers.

As I said, the iBuyPower would be a good official Steam Machine. It's comparatively cheap, it gives good bang-for-your-buck performance, and it's developed by people who seem to understand the concept Valve intended.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

the SteamBox is just able to run Linux supported games and stream existing non-Linux games from a Windows PC.

Regarding the article I am in agreement with what is being said, I think the SteamOS is aimed at people that don't have a lot of knowledge about Personal Computers and having fourteen in the market that range from $500 to $6,000 that I have seen is just going to confuse people more. In my opinion the one that can dual boot between Windows and the SteamOS for $1,500 is still excessive, but I understand that one for people that want to play games that aren't available on Linux, I have a harder time understanding the need for dual GeForce Titan cards in one computer.

6 grand.... 6 grand... no... I'm just not seeing it. Unless they crammed live leprechauns and unicorns into that box, I don't see what it's doing costing that much. O.O

at least I know if I ever become a billionaire, there'll be an overpriced piece of hardward to play on my 40,000 dollar 80 inch tv.

balladbird:
6 grand.... 6 grand... no... I'm just not seeing it. Unless they crammed live leprechauns and unicorns into that box, I don't see what it's doing costing that much. O.O

at least I know if I ever become a billionaire, there'll be an overpriced piece of hardward to play on my 40,000 dollar 80 inch tv.

I am going by this link which if you max out the hardware it will cost $6,000 - http://steamdb.info/blog/

My guess is it would use dual GeForce Titans which are around a grand each and using multiple large Solid State Drives with some other really expensive tech that is bleeding edge. Its also made by Falcon Northwest, which I find to be expensive like Alienware was.

Akichi Daikashima:
...Also, iBuyPower looks like the only company who gets it, because they hit that $500 mark, which is within reaching distance of console prices, and it might end up being powerful(if they believe in Steam Machines and sell at a slight loss).

Actually, CyberPowerPC has a $500 Steam Machine as well. And while definitive specs on iBuyPower's machine are currently hard to find, CyberPowerPC's two configs are supposedly:

CYBERPOWERPC Steam Machine A - $499

Case: CYBERPOWERPC Steam Machine Gaming Chassis
Graphics: AMD Radeon R9 270 2GB GDDR5
Processor: AMD A6-6400K 3.90 GHz
Storage: 500GB SATA-III 7200 RPM HDD
RAM: 8GB DDR3 1600MHz Dual Channel Memory
Chipset: mITX motherboard w/ 802.11 WiFi + Bluetooth
Steam Controller
Steam OS

CYBERPOWERPC Steam Machine I - $699

Case: CYBERPOWERPC Steam Machine Gaming Chassis
Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 2GB GDDR5
Processor: Intel Core i3-4330 3.50 GHz
Storage: 500GB SATA-III 7200 RPM HDD
RAM: 8GB DDR3 1600MHz Dual Channel Memory
Chipset: mITX motherboard w/ 802.11 AC WiFi + Bluetooth
Steam Controller
Steam OS

Videogamer via vg247.com

Sanunes:

balladbird:
6 grand.... 6 grand... no... I'm just not seeing it. Unless they crammed live leprechauns and unicorns into that box, I don't see what it's doing costing that much. O.O

at least I know if I ever become a billionaire, there'll be an overpriced piece of hardward to play on my 40,000 dollar 80 inch tv.

I am going by this link which if you max out the hardware it will cost $6,000 - http://steamdb.info/blog/

My guess is it would use dual GeForce Titans which are around a grand each and using multiple large Solid State Drives with some other really expensive tech that is bleeding edge. Its also made by Falcon Northwest, which I find to be expensive like Alienware was.

Huh, wish I'd seen the info earlier... I admit, that's a pretty sexy amount of power, but I don't think enough people will be that hardcore into the process to merit them selling it as a pre-assembled console. Hell, a PC with almost comparative specs could be assembled for less than a third of that.

You can't use a dedicated Steam Machine as a PC, therefore it has to be reasonably priced.

You also need to do research to see if it supports the games you want it to, get familiar with Linux releases, DICE announced a little while back that they would support Linux at some point, it's a little disappointing the Steam Machines arn't standardised because it means developers have to test for a large array of hardware like they already do with PC.

It's going to be hard for a special console like this to appeal, so it's going to have to do it with its price.

Andy Chalk:

It's a valid point. Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it.

Clearly, they should make Steam a Steam Machine exclusive platform.

Morti:

Andy Chalk:
Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it.

At least someone gets it. Been thinking this every time we hear about another steam machine in the 4 digit price range.

Word. As far as I can tell, the iBuyPower Steam Box is the only one worth considering.

The Wykydtron:
I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill.

<raises hand> Well, there's me. I'm the market niche they need to fill. I'm a lifelong console guy who'd like to play more PC games, but I can't justify replacing my perfectly-good current PC because it does everything else I need it to. Besides, I don't have the slightest clue how to build computers, and I don't have the time, money or interest required to learn how. I just want to buy a thing and play games on it. So I would totally get this.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

Nope, not at all. Its a pc with a sticker on it. They will very widely as to what hardware is in them and so will still have the same issues as current pc games. With odd problems cropping up because they have a different graphics card or something and bleeding edge new games not playable on lower end machines.

Also steam OS only runs linux. Out of all the games on steam only like 260 run on linux. So for the VAST majority of steam games need to be sure your steambox also has a windows install. So yeah, just stick with your pc and just download steam os if you want to try it out, and you have the graphics card supported by steam oc.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

You don't see the clear market niche because pretty much everything you said about the Steam Machines in your post is wrong.

They're not console's, they're PC's. They're meant to be a potential replacement for consoles in the living room, but they absolutely can still function as PC's. They'll run on the Steam OS which is a Valve developed Linux variant, and use of Steam won't even be required. If you want to install games outside of Steam, you can still do that. These are a cheap (in most cases) ready built, upgradeable living room PC. They're meant to make the process of getting into PC games easier for those who've never bothered, and more attractive by focusing on the living room.

There is also going to be the option to stream games from your main desktop PC instead of on the steambox, opening the door to some really cheap alternatives for those with a good PC who'd like to still play some games on the big screen.

And multiplatform releases probably won't be a problem since Valve is pushing heavily for Linux support, and they may be the only company out there that could actually grow that segment in gaming once they release these boxes and the Steam OS.

Dire Trout:

The Wykydtron:
I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill.

<raises hand> Well, there's me. I'm the market niche they need to fill. I'm a lifelong console guy who'd like to play more PC games, but I can't justify replacing my perfectly-good current PC because it does everything else I need it to. Besides, I don't have the slightest clue how to build computers, and I don't have the time, money or interest required to learn how. I just want to buy a thing and play games on it. So I would totally get this...

...if it was competitively priced.

Those are the only 5 words I'd add to your post. This product needs to be priced to compete with consoles. Otherwise it's pointless for PC folk and unattractive to console players. Unless they have some uber secret they are waiting to tell us, which seems highly unlikely.

Mr C:

Dire Trout:

The Wykydtron:
I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill.

<raises hand> Well, there's me. I'm the market niche they need to fill. I'm a lifelong console guy who'd like to play more PC games, but I can't justify replacing my perfectly-good current PC because it does everything else I need it to. Besides, I don't have the slightest clue how to build computers, and I don't have the time, money or interest required to learn how. I just want to buy a thing and play games on it. So I would totally get this...

...if it was competitively priced.

Those are the only 5 words I'd add to your post. This product needs to be priced to compete with consoles. Otherwise it's pointless for PC folk and unattractive to console players. Unless they have some uber secret they are waiting to tell us, which seems highly unlikely.

Well, the iBuyPower one is $500. So, the same price as an Xbone, but more powerful (according to my one friend who knows stuff about computers, anyway), with more games I'm actually interested in, no needless TV TV TV SPORTS SPORTS TV nonsense and no Kinect? I can work with that. Really, at this point, the biggest question mark for me is still the controller.

Akichi Daikashima:

It's the "I'm not decided on next gen, and I've heard nifty things about PC and Steam, but I do not know enough about PC Gaming to know what I should get, and I don't want to be swindled by store clerks trying to sell me a shitty celeron laptop".

It's not that sizeable, but it's still the first generation of steam machines, so they are most likely here just to test the waters.

The second generation is when we will see if Valve's gambit has/can pay off.

Also, iBuyPower looks like the only company who gets it, because they hit that $500 mark, which is within reaching distance of console prices, and it might end up being powerful(if they believe in Steam Machines and sell at a slight loss).

It could also be powerful simply by the (proposed) nature of SteamOS.

A slimmed down Debian Linux distro with it's core infrastructure retooled for multimedia functionality. As in optimized, and more easily modified, video and audio drivers, libraries, etc.

Given the performance boost seen in the Linux builds of games like Left 4 Dead 2 and Team Fortress 2, and some of the early reports of users experiences with the SteamOS beta, I'm confident in saying even the $500 iBuyPower machine will be drastically more powerful than any of the new-gen consoles.

Dire Trout:

Mr C:

Dire Trout:

<raises hand> Well, there's me. I'm the market niche they need to fill. I'm a lifelong console guy who'd like to play more PC games, but I can't justify replacing my perfectly-good current PC because it does everything else I need it to. Besides, I don't have the slightest clue how to build computers, and I don't have the time, money or interest required to learn how. I just want to buy a thing and play games on it. So I would totally get this...

...if it was competitively priced.

Those are the only 5 words I'd add to your post. This product needs to be priced to compete with consoles. Otherwise it's pointless for PC folk and unattractive to console players. Unless they have some uber secret they are waiting to tell us, which seems highly unlikely.

Well, the iBuyPower one is $500. So, the same price as an Xbone, but more powerful (according to my one friend who knows stuff about computers, anyway), with more games I'm actually interested in, no needless TV TV TV SPORTS SPORTS TV nonsense and no Kinect? I can work with that. Really, at this point, the biggest question mark for me is still the controller.

That's a good point. I was thinking more of a PS4 price point (the console I'll be buying soon). As a gamer in Asia the XBone is a long way off. A steambox would be a suitable replacement when I think about it, without kinect crap I'm not interested in and TV features I can't access here.

Mr C:

Dire Trout:

Mr C:

...if it was competitively priced.

Those are the only 5 words I'd add to your post. This product needs to be priced to compete with consoles. Otherwise it's pointless for PC folk and unattractive to console players. Unless they have some uber secret they are waiting to tell us, which seems highly unlikely.

Well, the iBuyPower one is $500. So, the same price as an Xbone, but more powerful (according to my one friend who knows stuff about computers, anyway), with more games I'm actually interested in, no needless TV TV TV SPORTS SPORTS TV nonsense and no Kinect? I can work with that. Really, at this point, the biggest question mark for me is still the controller.

That's a good point. I was thinking more of a PS4 price point (the console I'll be buying soon). As a gamer in Asia the XBone is a long way off. A steambox would be a suitable replacement when I think about it, without kinect crap I'm not interested in and TV features I can't access here.

I'm not in Asia, but yeah, that's what I was thinking--I could totally go for a PS4 and the iBuyPower box this generation. Even if the controller isn't as great as Valve thinks it is, I'm pretty sure the Steam Box has regular USB ports. So I could hypothetically plug in one of my regular controllers, or maybe even a keyboard and mouse if need be.

It's a valid point. Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it.

I'd agree, except people already slap down serious coin on Alienware and other boutique PCs.

But it also reveals that even among the people who are making them, there's no consensus on what the actual intent is - if there even is some specific "goal" at all.

And that's the problem. There wasn't a specific goal spelled out. People have been kind of retconning the process.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right?

It's a PC that comes with SteamOS on it and can only run non-Linux supported games if you have another PC to stream from.

Akichi Daikashima:

It's the "I'm not decided on next gen, and I've heard nifty things about PC and Steam, but I do not know enough about PC Gaming to know what I should get, and I don't want to be swindled by store clerks trying to sell me a shitty celeron laptop".

So now you can get swindled by store clerks trying to sell you a shitty Steam Machine?

It's not like there's unified hardware or anything.

Dire Trout:
I'm a lifelong console guy who'd like to play more PC games, but I can't justify replacing my perfectly-good current PC because it does everything else I need it to.

So your solution is to buy a prefab PC that won't run most PC games without another PC to stream from? That seems...Problematic. Especially considering you're going to need a PC capable of streaming in the first place.

I mean, okay, I get that you want to play PC games and don't have the know-how. But this seems like a poor alternative unless you're only into Linux games.

The Wykydtron:
So this is like a console that only runs Steam and all games on Steam right? That doesn't seem the most viable business strat i've heard considering all the multiplatform releases and y'know, Steam has been a PC only thing for ages now. Anyone who already uses Steam has a decent enough PC to run most of its games?

I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

Try SOME of the games on Steam. Steam Machines run Linux which means have fun with Team Fortress 2.

soandnb:
Valve shot itself in the foot by allowing multiple Steam Machines to enter the market.

I'm going to go the other way on this and say it's a great strategy. Companies keep announcing new Steambox builds, which is free advertising. There's also the fact that companies sign up to build Steamboxes, so Valve is likely collecting money from them in exchange for permission to do so. In fact, all Valve has to do is make the controllers, which the companies have to buy in order to sell the Steambox to begin with, so regardless of what happens to the companies building them, it looks like Valve comes out on top (as long as the deals negotiated are as in their favor as they appear to be).

This conversation, and many others like it, emphasize a widely-held viewpoint: It's unwise to bet against Valve, but really, wtf are they doing? I can see this working as some kind of Valve-controlled cross-platform PC standard similar to the old MPC standard from way back when, but I fail to see how that helps it make a meaningful dent in the living room scene. And without that, how does Valve make money on it? Licensing income from a handful of specialty PC builders will be negligible; Valve needs Steam to become a mass-market gaming platform in order for that to happen, but I don't grasp how this strategy pushes that forward.

So many unanswered questions. And Valve being Valve, they'll stay unanswered for a long time yet.

Kwil:

The Wykydtron:
I just don't see the clear market niche where Steam Machine is going to fill. I hate to say it, but just buy a PC if you want Steam.

The obvious market niche is the hardcore gamer that's grown up and taken on adult responsibilities and relationships. They can't reasonably justify an extra big HD monitor for their gaming habit on the PC, but neither can they justify leaving their multi-purpose, quality PC connected to the family's TV because the kids need to do their homework on it, and it gets used for looking up recipes or the like while the family watches TV. Plus, if there's more than one gamer in the family, sharing the game experience is also valuable, and let's be honest, most PC setups are not of the living room aesthetic variety.

Enter the Steambox. Make it cheap enough, single purpose enough, and, just as importantly, TV-console friendly enough, and now you've got a perfect box to hook up to the TV and leave there so that you can play all the cool games that you just aren't able to get on the regular console, not to mention access the massive library you've built up through steam sales and humble bundle deals.

This also ties in great to their new Friends and Family Accounts system. Mom can go upstairs and play Prototype in the family's steam account while knowing the kids downstairs on the Steambox are using the same account, but can't play any of the gory games like that one.

you know you can connect more than one monitor to a pc since 1988, do you?

steam machine and os is redundant for people who build at least one pc in their lifetime.
i am pretty sure that "hardcore" pc gamers already connected their pcs once in their lifetime to a television and i cant think of any reason to buy another pc in console form with an unknown operating system.

the steam controller looks promising, though.

Andy Chalk:
This conversation, and many others like it, emphasize a widely-held viewpoint: It's unwise to bet against Valve, but really, wtf are they doing? I can see this working as some kind of Valve-controlled cross-platform PC standard similar to the old MPC standard from way back when, but I fail to see how that helps it make a meaningful dent in the living room scene. And without that, how does Valve make money on it? Licensing income from a handful of specialty PC builders will be negligible; Valve needs Steam to become a mass-market gaming platform in order for that to happen, but I don't grasp how this strategy pushes that forward.

So many unanswered questions. And Valve being Valve, they'll stay unanswered for a long time yet.

the dent valve will make in the gaming industry will be with their focus on linux.

the steam machine will be something that happened some time ago and no one knows if its still alive and who is using it.
like dell or alienware.

the os will be a thing you installed some time ago to see how it was but then uninstalled it since it could only function with games and didnt offer much else.

this, i think will be the fate of the steam machine. possible exception: the steam controller.

I'd say he is missing the point, most companies have no intention of following the console idea they just want to be included in Valves free marketing so they slap their name tag on existing shit, job done.

rhizhim:
you know you can connect more than one monitor to a pc since 1988, do you?

steam machine and os is redundant for people who build at least one pc in their lifetime.
i am pretty sure that "hardcore" pc gamers already connected their pcs once in their lifetime to a television and i cant think of any reason to buy another pc in console form with an unknown operating system.

Well, I expect that's because you're not among the people within the group I specified. At a certain point in your life, you grow beyond wanting to live like you're in a college dorm, which means you have a living room that looks like an adult person's living room, and you don't want to have to be mucking around behind the TV all the time when you bring the PC in and out of it.

I'm kinda out of the loop and don't know a single thing about PC gaming, but what can the $500 Steam Machine not play?

I have a Mac, and have gotten a few games from Steam. Very low requirement games / old games and I absolutely love it. I would definitely pick a Steam Machine over Xbox One or PS4.

My only issue is that I feel like $500 would go a long way to a gaming PC once I learn about that trail some more.

So PC rig>Steam machine> consoles.

My only question is that a $500 Steam Machine should be able to run all next gen games....right?

What would I need with the $2,500 monster if I'm just trying to play games regularly like everyone else on PS4s and Xbox Ones. Investment for the even further future I suppose?

Edit: The market are those who want to get into PC gaming, but lack the-know-how. Like me.

CrossLOPER:

Andy Chalk:

It's a valid point. Gamers willing and able to drop the coin on a multi-thousand-dollar Steam Machine are probably going to be more likely to just build their own custom rig and slap Steam on it.

Clearly, they should make Steam a Steam Machine exclusive platform.

Not sure if you're being sarcastic or not here, but the reason (except for making money of course) is to push an open platform to compete against Windows (possibly) moving towards a more closed environment and the extremely closed consoles.

Making them exclusive would make them what they're trying to fight.

OT: While he does have a point here I disagree. Looking at the big picture those powerful beasts containing titan cards are as important in Valve's vision as those who can actually compete with consoles. Windows is the superior gaming platform because most PC games are developed with Windows in mind, but that's not all. Windows is also superior because it got a wider range of driver support for various kinds of hardware than its competitors. Linux lacks the driver support of Windows because there hasn't been a driving force behind making them. However by building computers meant to run Linux might lead the way towards a change. While I would rather build a PC and install SteamOS on it or maybe simply use dual boot on a PC I already have I would still need drivers to support my hardware. Because we all have different preferences in card manufacturers and which series of cards we want to use it's terribly inefficient to find out what each individual is using. These Steam machines change that since they make units that we can reproduce and we won't have the hassle of doing the research to what hardware the OS supports.

So they are missing the point when it comes to competing with consoles, but they are on the mark when it comes to pushing Linux ahead as a viable gaming platform.

There seems to be one thing some people seem to be missing on this thread.

A Steam Machine is still a PC. You can take your 500$ Steam Machine and install Windows on it.

Yes it comes pre-loaded with SteamOS with all its limitations and optimized nifty features. But nothing stops you from slapping on Windows (or even some regular Linux build) and turning it into a cheap regular PC in a nifty small factor case ,that fits nicely in the living room.

Kwil:

rhizhim:
you know you can connect more than one monitor to a pc since 1988, do you?

steam machine and os is redundant for people who build at least one pc in their lifetime.
i am pretty sure that "hardcore" pc gamers already connected their pcs once in their lifetime to a television and i cant think of any reason to buy another pc in console form with an unknown operating system.

Well, I expect that's because you're not among the people within the group I specified.

At a certain point in your life, you grow beyond wanting to live like you're in a college dorm, which means you have a living room that looks like an adult person's living room, and you don't want to have to be mucking around behind the TV all the time when you bring the PC in and out of it.

well, you could just put your pc working place close to your tv and connect them via a long cable.

you know, newer graphics cards tend to have a hdmi port and we also have hdmi cables that are longer than one meter (ten meters, about 30 feet hdmi cable costs 15 euros)

and there is always case modding...
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