"Candy Jam" Challenges Devs To Make Games About Candy - UPDATED

"Candy Jam" Challenges Devs To Make Games About Candy - UPDATED

Candy Jam

"Candy Jam" is a two-week game jam being held to protest King's recent trademarking of the word "candy."

You have no doubt heard by now that King, the maker of the mega-hit Candy Crush Saga, has somehow managed to successfully trademark the word "candy" and is now dropping the hammer on other mobile gamer makers who have used it in their titles. This, rather predictably, has not gone over especially well with gamers, but it seems that at least a few indie developers aren't too happy with the situation either.

In response, indie game makers Cariboo and uuav have put together "Candy Jam," which gives interested developers until February 3 to "make a game involving candies." That's pretty much it for the rules, although entrants are encouraged to "consider using the word 'candy' several times, also 'scroll,' 'memory,' 'saga' and 'apple' might give bonus points."

As for the point of the whole thing, that too is pretty straightforward. "Because trademarking common names is ridiculous and because it gives us an occasion to make another game jam," the Candy Jam website explains.

"While there seems to be some kind of consensus about the need for a company to protect blatant ripoffs of game names and/or game aspects, I think that the fact that it was done with so little finesse is what gathered people in [opposition]," Candy Jam co-founder Laurent Raymond said. "That plus probably the irony of a company talking about intellectual property while being an nth rehash of Bejeweled."

Laurent said he hasn't heard from King about the Candy Jam, and that he doesn't expect that the studio will care about it one way or the other. And while he thinks that the jam is a worthwhile effort, he doesn't hold out much hope that it will change anything in the long run.

"I like that it shows that game developers are ready to mock them a little and that ethics matters a lot. They could have handled the issue so much differently," he said. "[But] I have little ambition about the whole thing. We're going to enjoy coding silly things, mock them, change a few minds and then everyone will forget the event as soon as it ends. I wish it would mean something but this is not the first time that it's happened, and most of the time it's handled by just letting the rage pass. We'll just add fun to that rage for once."

King recently stated in its defense that it's not looking to steal everyone's candy, just those who take advantage of the vagaries of the App Store. The icon for the ridiculously-named Candy Casino Slots - Jewel Craze Connect: Big Blast Mania Land, for instance, has only the words "Candy Slots" on its App Store icon, while the title itself appears designed solely to boost search rankings, lending some credence to King's claim.

Candy Jam is live now and runs until February 3. To get in on the action, head over to TheCandyJam.com.

UPDATE: In his original email, Candy Jam founder Laurent Raymond said, "I think that the fact that it was done with so little finesse is what gathered people in [opposition]. That plus probably the irony of a company talking about copyrights while being an nth rehash of Bejeweled." He has since contacted us to note that he was in fact referring to intellectual property.

"I obviously believe in being right and the fact I'm representing the Candy Jam makes [the misstatement] even more unfortunate," Raymond said. "Hopefully it doesn't change my message because I'm trying to make a point about ethics and not any particular technical flaw in the law."

We have updated the statement accordingly.

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And no doubt King will try to crush them like a stale rainbow drop for daring to use their word.

If I had any talent I'd mke a match-3, collectable card game with a sugary motif called 'Candy Saga: Memory of the Apple Scroll: Edge'.

How did they actually get the trademark when hundreds of games had the word "Candy" in their titles long before Candy Crush existed?

XMark:
How did they actually get the trademark when hundreds of games had the word "Candy" in their titles long before Candy Crush existed?

Because trademarks are based on brand recognition, not creation.

Apple didn't invent the word "Apple" either, but they used is as their name, and now they have a trademark on it, so you can't sell your own apple computers.

Unlike copyrights, which are intended to reward creativity, trademarks are intended to protect marketing honesty by forcing companies not to sell their product under a misleading name that would give the impression that it is connected to another brand more recognized under that name.

I HAVE A GREAT GAME IDEA! this started as a kind of joke and pursuit of troublemaking, but I honestly think I have a good idea here...

This one is free, whoever claims it first in a PM to me owns the IP. it's called Candy Scroll Memory Saga. it essentially plays like any other game of memory, however there is a grid of scrolls, you click one, it unravels, reveals a piece of candy, which you then match by memory to other scrolls.

for an added layer of gameplay-ness, I also could see it being each map with a limited number of turns, clearing as much as you can in that turn window. the candies you match could be added to an inventory, to be sold at a shop for various powerups, or to create your own memory board to stump other players. the more candies left on the board at the end of another player's attempt to solve, nets you more coins for the shop. the shop would also have rare that you can purchase for your board, or even secret "bomb" candies that when they match up a pair using one of the bomb candies, it puts more random Candy Scrolls back on the board.

Alterego-X:
Because trademarks are based on brand recognition, not creation.

Apple didn't invent the word "Apple" either, but they used is as their name, and now they have a trademark on it, so you can't sell your own apple computers.

Unlike copyrights, which are intended to reward creativity, trademarks are intended to protect marketing honesty by forcing companies not to sell their product under a misleading name that would give the impression that it is connected to another brand more recognized under that name.

That would be the fairy land explanation of proceedings.

Here in the real world however it is kill or be killed, first guy who gets the name past the copyright/trademark committee stomp the competition and takes their money. And while generic words and names were suppose to be absolutely prohibited from trademarking (Coca-Cola is not allowed to hold neither coca or cola for example) the fact is that committee is getting a measly salary while companies have millions riding on these approvals so under the table endorsements are no strangers to these folk.

CriticalMiss:
And no doubt King will try to crush them like a stale rainbow drop for daring to use their word.

If I had any talent I'd mke a match-3, collectable card game with a sugary motif called 'Candy Saga: Memory of the Apple Scroll: Edge'.

If the candy jam is in the US, the trademark is only valid in the states which is why king wants to go for the EU next but will hopefully fail due to the broard nature of the trademark.
OT: good on them, the US seriously needs it's laws fixed, the whole apple patenting shapes etc only happens in the US, the rest of the world just laugh at them whenever they try (eg: when they tried to get the galaxy tab for copying the iPad they lost in every country except the Us)

martyrdrebel27:
I HAVE A GREAT GAME IDEA!...it's called Candy Scroll Memory Saga

That has some of the same words in the title as my fictional game. I'll sue you!

CriticalMiss:

martyrdrebel27:
I HAVE A GREAT GAME IDEA!...it's called Candy Scroll Memory Saga

That has some of the same words in the title as my fictional game. I'll sue you!

Needs more "Edge" in it.

Captcha: "fair play". Heh.

Mr.K.:
And while generic words and names were suppose to be absolutely prohibited from trademarking (Coca-Cola is not allowed to hold neither coca or cola for example)

Generic descriptions are prohibited, because they don't imply branding. This is not the same as common words being prohibited.

You can't trademark "Cola" as a cola brand, because it is a generalized term for drinks that doesn't imply one particular seller's brand. Same reason as why the early "Escalator" and "Aspirin" trademarks were overturned as they became general terms. You can trademark Apple computers, if you are the most famous one selling them under that name, and your usage of the word implies a specific Apple brand, but you can't trademark "Apple" apples, if it is a generic term for them.

This Candy Saga ruling is excessive, but not because it trademarked a common word, but because Candy wasn't all that commonly associated with that particular game, let alone Saga.

CriticalMiss:

martyrdrebel27:
I HAVE A GREAT GAME IDEA!...it's called Candy Scroll Memory Saga

That has some of the same words in the title as my fictional game. I'll sue you!

fine, I'll make another game just called Scroll Scroll Candy Scroll Candy Candy Scroll Scroll: The Saga Saga

I'm surprised they missed out on "Edge", I mean really! That was one of the big ones should memory serve, and it could be in honor of that moronic little sack of worthless rotting meat getting the everloving crap smacked out of him by the legal system for trying to sue people using "edge" in their names.

I iwll give them some benefit of the doubt on this one. While they are a match 3 genre, which isn't original, there are four tons of clones of their specific implementation of it. It is ridiculous and as an industry we should be doing more, or really anything, to protect actual game creators from these knockoff trade ins. Not even talking 'same genre' stuff here, most of them are literal copies of the games, sometimes using all the original assets. And there is precious little companies can do about it, so if this helps, and they DON'T use it willy nilly...

mistwolf:
I iwll give them some benefit of the doubt on this one. While they are a match 3 genre, which isn't original, there are four tons of clones of their specific implementation of it. It is ridiculous and as an industry we should be doing more, or really anything, to protect actual game creators from these knockoff trade ins. Not even talking 'same genre' stuff here, most of them are literal copies of the games, sometimes using all the original assets. And there is precious little companies can do about it, so if this helps, and they DON'T use it willy nilly...

And it's okay to go after clones of your game, but the problem here is, King keeps going after games that aren't clones, they aren't even in the same genre, just happen to have "Candy" or "Saga" in the title.

Candy Slots is a casino slot machine game

The Banner Saga is a strategy rpg that looks literally nothing like Candy Crush in any way, shape or form.

No, you are totally right and that is complete BS. Going after The Banner Saga is a step way over the line. I offered some benefit of the doubt, but clearly, they'd burned that before I even offered it, so nuts to them.

 

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