Oklahoma Student Translates Bosch's Hellish Butt Chant

Oklahoma Student Translates Bosch's Hellish Butt Chant

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It's not completely accurate, she admits, but if you've ever wondered what it's like to sing choir in Hell, now you know.

Hieronymous Bosch created his infamous triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights, at the beginning of the 16th Century, and hidden away in Musician's Hell on the far right panel is a choral scene. The choristers, egged on by devils, are singing a chant with music seared across a poor sinner's arse. Amelia, a student at Oklahoma Christian University, noticed this and decided to translate the piece. Now you and all the world can find out what a tune sung in Hell might sound like, right over here.

The Garden is one of this master-worker's most famous pieces, and currently is displayed at the Prado, in Spain. Paradise, with Adam and Eve and many other wonders is over on the far left of the triptych. The center panel is devoted to the Earth, while the far right depicts all the savagery of Hell.

It's not the weirdest of Bosch's art by any means, and while his pieces tended to reflect the moral structure of his time, their surreal portrayal is inspirational to this day. The surrealists themselves - Salvador Dali in particular - loved Bosch's work. Nobody knows why Bosch painted this piece, though the accepted theory is that it was created for a patron's amusement - or edification - and not as a church altar piece.

"I decided to transcribe it into modern notation," Amelia explains, "assuming the second line of the staff is C, as is common for chants of this era ... The last few measures are kind of obscured but I tried my best." The music translation isn't perfect, Amelia admits, and she's working with her university musical department to perfect it.

Source: Dangerous Minds

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That actually doesn't sound too bad...
Definitely not if you imagine it with a few other instruments added into the mix.

Butt music. 600 years old and still better than dubstep.

As a conaisseur of late medieval and early renaissance arse-music I'm honestly disapointed by the inaccurate choice of instruments.


I really should fund a butt-trumpet ensemble to perform this wonderful piece of music as its creator intended.

That is another unique feature to Bosch's paintings; one can hear them as much as one can see them. The clamor and chaos of the settings emanates into the viewers' mind, and always in the background of one's contemplation is the eternal cacophony of the surreal. Whether it is the Temptation of St. Anthony or The Garden of Earthly Delights, one cannot help but look on Bosch and hear the dissonant chorus of a thousand screeching, hooting, howling nightmares, a dozen lustful moans and indulgent groans as his innocent sinners slurp and nibble with abandon, and the brazen procession of innumerable trumpets, both profane and divine.

CriticalMiss:
Butt music. 600 years old and still better than dubstep.

Schhh, quiet! Don't provoke the creation of a dubstep remix.

Oh, who am I kidding, someone is probably already on it as we speak.

CorvusFerreum:
As a conaisseur of late medieval and early renaissance arse-music I'm honestly disapointed by the inaccurate choice of instruments.


I really should fund a butt-trumpet ensemble to perform this wonderful piece of music as its creator intended.

You, sir, just made my day

also, Hellish Butt Chant is my Molly Hatchet cover band

So which one's the brown note? I bet nobody's made that joke before...

Also, relevant: image

CriticalMiss:
Butt music. 600 years old and still better than dubstep.

You missed a perfect opportunity to make a joke about butt rock instead.

From Amelia's blog:
I still can't believe this took off like it did this is crazy???

Amazing what kind of response you get when you mix passion with a little elbow grease.

Bah. I've listened to it.

The music is total ass; I was disappointed.

 

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