Strategic Card Game Draco Magi Is Developer's Seventh Successful Kickstarter

Strategic Card Game Draco Magi Is Developer's Seventh Successful Kickstarter

Strategic card game Draco Magi is in its final Kickstarter days and coming close to hitting its ninth stretch goal. Having received almost $60,000 in funding, it is the seventh successfully funded Kickstarter project by developer Robert Burke Games.

UPDATE: The article originally stated that Draco Magi is the developer's eighth successfully funded project on Kickstarter. It is, in fact, his seventh.

Robert Burke Games may not be a household name yet, but with six successfully funded Kickstarter projects under its belt and a seventh that is already almost 400% funded, this small tabletop and card game developer is working on what promises to be its most popular game yet.

Named Draco Magi, the two-player strategic card game takes about 30 minutes to play and tasks players with collecting gems by winning dragon versus dragon battles across battlefields that grant bonuses to different dragon types. Featuring stunning artwork that gives it the appearance of having a major publisher behind it, the game will retail for $25 upon launch, but backers can buy the full game for $15 - plus the minimum pledge of $1.

Robert Burke Games has raised over $125,000 in funding on Kickstarter since 2012. With four days left to go before its funding period has ended, Draco Magi has already received almost $60,000 in pledges, attaining eight stretch goals and only $2000 away from a ninth. "My games would not exist without Kickstarter," Robert Burke told The Escapist. "It helps me fund my ideas and transform them into real products."

Source: Kickstarter

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Somebody needs to double check their count.

He has 8 projects, not eight successful projects. 6 successful, 1 failed, and 1 about to be successful. It isn't much of an accomplishment either, I'd say, when most projects required jack shit for their goal. The only one really impressing would be Battle of Souls which required 25k.

Not that very low-priced goals is a mark against quality of course, but I'd also wouldn't be impressed by someone who gets 10 $1000 projects to succeed either.

They named a game after me?!

(My Main's name on WoW was Dracomagi)

this is abusing the system, creators are supposed to take risks too!

Hummm i'm not at all in card game, but the art of thouse card is pretty. Just saying

So if I do not win everyone will call me noob in latin behind my back? That is a quite pleasent change to other games where people shout "NOOB!" directly into my face plus other obscene words and they do not even bother using latin.

Symbio Joe:
So if I do not win everyone will call me noob in latin behind my back? That is a quite pleasent change to other games where people shout "NOOB!" directly into my face plus other obscene words and they do not even bother using latin.

Hahahah... It's a classier breed of trolling. Troglodytarum Maximus!

cursedseishi:
It isn't much of an accomplishment either, I'd say, when most projects required jack shit for their goal. The only one really impressing would be Battle of Souls which required 25k.

Not that very low-priced goals is a mark against quality of course, but I'd also wouldn't be impressed by someone who gets 10 $1000 projects to succeed either.

We see a general progression in the projects -- they started off smaller scale, but Battle of Souls ramped things up, as does this latest work. If he is frugal with the money, why should he be criticized for managing a budget well? Draco Magi looks about as professional as they come, and he's able to do that on a solid budget. He's not "charging" for all the time he spent developing the game, just the money required for licensing, production, and distribution. 20 grand is likely more than I'd ever be able to raise for a project, and this guy raised 125k over seven projects. Sure, some required only a couple grand, but he has two now that are quite high up there. He used his early projects as proof of concept to build his reputation -- I think that makes him smart.

Rhykker:

Symbio Joe:
So if I do not win everyone will call me noob in latin behind my back? That is a quite pleasent change to other games where people shout "NOOB!" directly into my face plus other obscene words and they do not even bother using latin.

Hahahah... It's a classier breed of trolling. Troglodytarum Maximus!

cursedseishi:
It isn't much of an accomplishment either, I'd say, when most projects required jack shit for their goal. The only one really impressing would be Battle of Souls which required 25k.

Not that very low-priced goals is a mark against quality of course, but I'd also wouldn't be impressed by someone who gets 10 $1000 projects to succeed either.

We see a general progression in the projects -- they started off smaller scale, but Battle of Souls ramped things up, as does this latest work. If he is frugal with the money, why should he be criticized for managing a budget well? Draco Magi looks about as professional as they come, and he's able to do that on a solid budget. He's not "charging" for all the time he spent developing the game, just the money required for licensing, production, and distribution. 20 grand is likely more than I'd ever be able to raise for a project, and this guy raised 125k over seven projects. Sure, some required only a couple grand, but he has two now that are quite high up there. He used his early projects as proof of concept to build his reputation -- I think that makes him smart.

Did I criticize him or make any statement about his financial management? No. All I had said was that getting various ~$200-$1,000 projects to succeed isn't exactly what I'd call impressive. Projects with such a low goal require little investment, and if 100 people say "Eh, screw it here's $10" then it instantly succeeds. And as long as you tend to give what the project is funding out at the $10 level, then people tend to impulse-back it.

As for the two bigger ones? Re-read what I had said, as I said those would be the ones I'd be impressed by. I'm not so ignorant as to not look at the breakdowns for the costs that make up the sum of his required goal, or to assume and base anything upon his intelligence either.

It would be the same when I look at the dozens of RPG Maker-based games being published under the video game section. Yet the biggest difference here is the availability of RPG Maker as a program, and unless the project wows that $200-$1000 goal will never see the light of day. Even if they did succeed, it doesn't exactly impress me. Now you show me games like the original Corpse Party released way back in the mid-late 90s, or recently You Are Not The Hero, both of which developed using RPG Maker (at their respective times), they bring something strong and unique with them.

The game is what will impress me, not how much the cost or amount used was.

 

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