Rumor: Intel Moves Haswell CPU Refresh From May to April

Rumor: Intel Moves Haswell CPU Refresh From May to April

A Haswell refresh might come earlier than expected.

Reports coming out of Taiwan re pointing to a sooner-than-expected Haswell CPU refresh by Intel. The 22nm Haswell family, which debuted in June 2013, will reportedly get 20 new desktop and mobile models added next month.

Intel Haswell 4770K

Digitimes, as is usually the case, is the source of the rumor, and they were tipped off by DIY motherboard makers in Taiwan. The Haswell refresh would be timed with the release of new Intel 9-series chipset-based motherboards, also due out this Spring.

An earlier refresh would help Intel on two fronts. First, it would give more selling time to the existing flagship family of CPUs, while exposing consumers to newer, potentially more power-friendly chips of the same name -- like a more energy-efficient 4775 to replace the 4770 CPU. It would also give Intel the buffer it needs due to the Broadwell family delay. Broadwell chips, which are built on a newer, smaller 14nm process, are due out later this year. This past October, Intel said Broadwell would be delayed due to a "defect density issue." Broadwell chips were originally due out Q4 2013, and the delay pushed them initially to Q1 2014, but a front-and-center Haswell refresh could push the release to Q4.

If you're already running an Intel CPU from the Haswell or Ivy Bridge families, most of this news shouldn't concern you terribly, as an upgrade wouldn't be worth the money (the most powerful power users excluded). But if your last PC build dates back to 2009 or 2010? You might be waiting just a little bit longer for a truly new Intel CPU.

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If Broadwell can come onto the market with lower aggregate heat production under load then I'd consider upgrading anyway, even with a decent IB i7.

Bah! Bah I say! I've been waitin to upgrade from my Sandy Bridge because I've been waitin for a nice price drop on the Haswells. Now my hopes have been dashed spectacularly.

PuckFuppet:
If Broadwell can come onto the market with lower aggregate heat production under load then I'd consider upgrading anyway, even with a decent IB i7.

I hope they solder the die onto the IHS like they used to. Or use decent thermal paste.

Hell, either of those would probably make the new Haswell refresh preferable. From what I can gather the chip shouldn't run all that hotter than previous generations, just the terrible thermal conduction from the die to the IHS is raising temps.

shintakie10:
Bah! Bah I say! I've been waitin to upgrade from my Sandy Bridge because I've been waitin for a nice price drop on the Haswells. Now my hopes have been dashed spectacularly.

Sandy Bridge was such a good series! I still have my 2500K running strong on my home computer. Got a 4750K for work, was unimpressed.

Even with its lukewarm reception, I've been eying Haswell ever since it released. If only I had had any money...

No matter; my Nehalem i7 is a hell of a trooper and is continuing to serve me admirably. The good thing is that I may as well wait for Broadwell now, and get a nice multi-generational leap forward.

dharmaBum0:

shintakie10:
Bah! Bah I say! I've been waitin to upgrade from my Sandy Bridge because I've been waitin for a nice price drop on the Haswells. Now my hopes have been dashed spectacularly.

Sandy Bridge was such a good series! I still have my 2500K running strong on my home computer. Got a 4750K for work, was unimpressed.

I am still on a 1155 pin sandy bridge i7 2600 , worth every cent it cost me back in the day.

(i run it 24/7 with just the standard intel heat sink and she dosent get above 80 degrees Celsius and that was even during the heat wave we just had here)

dharmaBum0:

PuckFuppet:
If Broadwell can come onto the market with lower aggregate heat production under load then I'd consider upgrading anyway, even with a decent IB i7.

I hope they solder the die onto the IHS like they used to. Or use decent thermal paste.

Hell, either of those would probably make the new Haswell refresh preferable. From what I can gather the chip shouldn't run all that hotter than previous generations, just the terrible thermal conduction from the die to the IHS is raising temps.

I've heard similarly but my concern is that they won't properly take advantage of the better IHS designs/materials, I seriously doubt they'll actually invest much in a better TIM but we can hope. That said even using the same tech the BW chip should run cooler anyway.

Why does this matter to me? I make a good few custom builds for companies and private individuals, often to be used in situations outside of the norm, for instance I built one a few years back that went into a bunker alongside servers, they then sealed the entire thing in concrete, so no chance for ventilation there ^^.

I dropped down recently from a first run Sandy Bridge i7 to a Haswell i5 and I have to say... it's a bloody solid CPU so far. I don't do compiling or video editing or CAS so the hyperthreading doesn't really do much for me. So, to save $100 to go from the i7 to i5 and get one that runs pretty cool (so far I haven't exceeded 53C under load with aftermarket CM sink/fan, though I haven't run the Intel Burn yet... but pretty much all the others), is pretty nice.

I'm really pleased with the current run of Intel chips.

... and I sound like a bloody advert. @#)*.

Hope this includes Haswell-E. Been waiting for an upgrade for ages!

dharmaBum0:

PuckFuppet:
If Broadwell can come onto the market with lower aggregate heat production under load then I'd consider upgrading anyway, even with a decent IB i7.

I hope they solder the die onto the IHS like they used to. Or use decent thermal paste.

Hell, either of those would probably make the new Haswell refresh preferable. From what I can gather the chip shouldn't run all that hotter than previous generations, just the terrible thermal conduction from the die to the IHS is raising temps.

It is unlikely they will be going back to solder. There were problems with the smaller die sizes causing the solder based TIM to degrade from thermal cycling faster. Source. PDF warning. Technical research paper.

I am still quite happy with my 2600k its a little beast just sitting there day after day at 4.6ghtz still up there with the big boys of today( admittedly the memory controller of the sandy bridge series boards is kind of crap and this holds its performance back).

I will update my system when we get the refresh of Broadwell and replace my 680s with whatever the latest nvida is dont know if i can be arsed with SLI again or not.

I'm slightly worried at the price rise for Intel mid-to-high end CPUs as AMD seems to be falling behind even more and focusing entirely on APUs. Which is cool, and I love those little buggers (Kaveri seems to be bringing about 30% more juice to the graphics department, so cheap 1080p gaming = yay!), but I do hate the idea of monopoly that Intel will have soon (if not already).

shintakie10:
Bah! Bah I say! I've been waitin to upgrade from my Sandy Bridge because I've been waitin for a nice price drop on the Haswells. Now my hopes have been dashed spectacularly.

Honestly I wouldn't be in a hurry to replace your Sandy bridge, I have a 2600K and it still handles anything I throw at it. CPU's have basically hit a ceiling, the newer ones are more focused on power saving (especially for laptops/tablets) than improvements in performance/speed.

Well it doesn't matter to me until the Broadwell chips are out. I'll let the early adopters find bugs in their $200+ silicon think plates, but I'm waiting for the newer model to lower the prices on Haswell CPUs. Plus, it gives me time to machine custom parts for my TJ-07 watercooled build. I even still need to think of a theme for it. I'd do a Metroid or Venture Bros. theme, but the though of a garish orange and yellow box kinda puts me off on either one. And I can't find someone who can airbrush Dr. Mrs. The Monarch in her cheerleader outfit for cheap.

I'm still running a first gen I7. It's starting to show its age but is still doing well. Well enough that I feel and some new memory and a GPU will keep my system viable for another few years.

I would hope that Intel would stop trying to minimize costs as much as possible and move back to using solder instead of the thermal paste that they use now. I don't want to have to replace my CPU in only three to four years.

 

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