FCC to Update Net Neutrality Rules After Court Loss

FCC to Update Net Neutrality Rules After Court Loss

After last month's court loss, the FCC is committed to revamping its net neutrality policies.

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The FCC has decided it will not appeal last month's court ruling, instead pushing forward with a new, updated set of regulations. Last month's court case saw the Washington D.C. Court of Appeals strike down a "reclassification" effort by the FCC, in which certain telecommunication companies would be subject to non-discrimination and no-blocking regulations. The court decision said the proposed regulations extended beyond the FCC's reach, but it left the door open for new regulations if the commission reworked its approach.

In lieu of an appeal, the FCC will attempt to restructure the new rules within the confines of Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. That particular section of the act, in a nutshell, promotes unrestricted Internet access for all at competitive prices.

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler will be taking public input on the revamped regulations, and the reclassification shot down last month could make another appearance, so long as it's modified. Wheeler will also be pushing local governments to build their own broadband networks, which would put pressure on large telcos to keep speeds high and prices low.

Net neutrality has been the biggest political flashpoint in tech over the last several years, as the FCC is committed keeping the Internet as open and fast as possible. A lack of such regulation could allow for potential skirmishes between those that control the infrastructure (Verizon, Comcast, etc.) and content creators (Netflix, Google, Youtube). For example, Comcast could decide to slow all Netflix-related traffic on its network, unless Netflix pays additional access fees.

The biggest issue with implementing net neutrality regulations is that telecommunications companies, at least when it comes to Internet access, aren't treated like other communications utilities, like landline telephone access.

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We'll see how that goes. FCC is notoriously populated by corporate lobbyists who do more for the corporations than they do for the consumers. Meanwhile in Europe: http://gigaom.com/2014/01/23/net-neutrality-just-got-a-boost-in-europe-thanks-to-a-consumer-rights-committee/

That's right. Europe doesn't try to destroy everything just so a few companies can make a few more bucks. God damn the US crony fuckin' capitalism and anti-free market politics. How do Americans still put up with that shit?

I expect this to go nowhere. Or at least, nowhere good.
Besides, if the FCC is content to just let the two largest ISPs in the country effectively merge into a fuck-off virtual monopoly later this year, they probably aren't terribly concerned with protecting the average person.

Run the government like a corporation, and its citizens become customers.

With Tom Wheeler at the helm, I'll believe it when I see it. The current FCC is a joke. Talk about putting the fox in charge of guarding the henhouse...

We'll see - I guess all we can do is hope for the best.

cynicalsaint1:
We'll see - I guess all we can do is hope for the best.

We can, but should the FCC fail to sink its teeth into this problem effectively,we should also be ready to place a phone call to our local congress people and demand they get their butts in gear to write new legislation giving the FCC enough power to effectively enforce net neutrality. Should we hope, and that hope fail, action becomes our next recourse. If we fail to take action, we've no one but ourselves to blame.

Adam Jensen:
We'll see how that goes. FCC is notoriously populated by corporate lobbyists who do more for the corporations than they do for the consumers. Meanwhile in Europe: http://gigaom.com/2014/01/23/net-neutrality-just-got-a-boost-in-europe-thanks-to-a-consumer-rights-committee/

That's right. Europe doesn't try to destroy everything just so a few companies can make a few more bucks. God damn the US crony fuckin' capitalism and anti-free market politics. How do Americans still put up with that shit?

Because all politicians do is talk nothing and name call and smear each other, muddy the waters as much you can so noone pays any attention to you. never talk issues or facts. and keep the voters ignorant.

and boy are they.

what was it the other day 40% of americans did not know the earth went around the sun, and we expect them to be educated voters.

so much for 40 years of NEA and no child left behind and politicians making text books for children, dumber and dumber and not a critical thought in their brainwashed little heads to ask the important questions.

The people with the money don't want net neutrality, so there won't be net neutrality.

Gorrath:

cynicalsaint1:
We'll see - I guess all we can do is hope for the best.

We can, but should the FCC fail to sink its teeth into this problem effectively,we should also be ready to place a phone call to our local congress people and demand they get their butts in gear to write new legislation giving the FCC enough power to effectively enforce net neutrality. Should we hope, and that hope fail, action becomes our next recourse. If we fail to take action, we've no one but ourselves to blame.

I honestly have more faith in the FCC than I do Congress.
The US Congress is an amazing clusterfuck of useless these days.

It's possible that if big cable internet companies take advantage of this situation too restrict the internet, new cable internet companies could rise on the premise of maintaining net neutrality, and thrive based on that, overtaking the old guard who wouldn't be able to compete without essentially backtracking, something companies are loathe too do.

cynicalsaint1:

Gorrath:

cynicalsaint1:
We'll see - I guess all we can do is hope for the best.

We can, but should the FCC fail to sink its teeth into this problem effectively,we should also be ready to place a phone call to our local congress people and demand they get their butts in gear to write new legislation giving the FCC enough power to effectively enforce net neutrality. Should we hope, and that hope fail, action becomes our next recourse. If we fail to take action, we've no one but ourselves to blame.

I honestly have more faith in the FCC than I do Congress.
The US Congress is an amazing clusterfuck of useless these days.

Oh no doubt about that, Congress is a damned mess, but it's a mess we've let fester through our unwillingness to cross party lines. Congress seems ineffectual because we've insisted that our Congress people be totally intractable. Of course my bias here is that I'm a centrist, and so that shows through, but I do think the Congress is not just useless because we let them be, but because we demand they be. The best way to re-election these days is towing the party line, keeping your head down and not making any waves. Talk a good talk, do nothing of any note and no one will be able to criticize you.

Tradjus:
It's possible that if big cable internet companies take advantage of this situation too restrict the internet, new cable internet companies could rise on the premise of maintaining net neutrality, and thrive based on that, overtaking the old guard who wouldn't be able to compete without essentially backtracking, something companies are loathe too do.

Sadly, it's not that simple.
In the US, a very small number of large powerful ISPs own the backbone, so they have sovereignty.

Any new ISP development would have to plug into that backbone, and to get new backbones developed an ISP needs the rights to develop (municipality rights if laying cable, broadcasting rights if wireless/satellite).

That's where most new/small ISPs are hitting the barrier: Monopolies and governmental influence. Hell, even the really big fish like google are running into it:

Example:

http://consumerist.com/2014/01/30/kansas-legislature-wants-to-stop-any-other-kansas-cities-from-getting-google-fiber/

The crooks own the police. The inmates run the asylum, etc..

Tradjus:
It's possible that if big cable internet companies take advantage of this situation too restrict the internet, new cable internet companies could rise on the premise of maintaining net neutrality, and thrive based on that, overtaking the old guard who wouldn't be able to compete without essentially backtracking, something companies are loathe too do.

The hard part is the cost of infrastructure, where the government has backed companies to build transmission lines that would otherwise be on the bad end of a cost-benefit analysis. The problem is that in order for a new company to really compete, they'd need similar backing for infrastructure costs that the government simply will not (and can not) subsidize. Now that the big telecoms have gotten the government to help with the costs, they don't want to have to deal with the resulting necessary regulation that comes with it. Even as a self described Libertarian, I think the middle infrastructure should be public-owned with the last-mile owned privately. Unfortunately, this boat has already sailed.

cynicalsaint1:

I honestly have more faith in the FCC than I do Congress.

Not that big a feat, with Congress' approval ratings hovering around those of serial rapists.

That said, expecting congress to legislate and enforce policies aimed at curbing corporate money-grabbing is especially laughable.

cerebus23:

Adam Jensen:
We'll see how that goes. FCC is notoriously populated by corporate lobbyists who do more for the corporations than they do for the consumers. Meanwhile in Europe: http://gigaom.com/2014/01/23/net-neutrality-just-got-a-boost-in-europe-thanks-to-a-consumer-rights-committee/

That's right. Europe doesn't try to destroy everything just so a few companies can make a few more bucks. God damn the US crony fuckin' capitalism and anti-free market politics. How do Americans still put up with that shit?

Because all politicians do is talk nothing and name call and smear each other, muddy the waters as much you can so noone pays any attention to you. never talk issues or facts. and keep the voters ignorant.

and boy are they.

what was it the other day 40% of americans did not know the earth went around the sun, and we expect them to be educated voters.

so much for 40 years of NEA and no child left behind and politicians making text books for children, dumber and dumber and not a critical thought in their brainwashed little heads to ask the important questions.

25%, But what they didn't show here on the escapist, is that Europeans who took the same poll, it shows that 29% Of Europeans don't know the Earth goes Around the sun, So. Yea. You lot aren't any better it seems.

Not that anyone in that thread will acknowledge it, because yaknow Stupid 'Murica.

Atmos Duality:
I expect this to go nowhere. Or at least, nowhere good.
Besides, if the FCC is content to just let the two largest ISPs in the country effectively merge into a fuck-off virtual monopoly later this year, they probably aren't terribly concerned with protecting the average person.

Run the government like a corporation, and its citizens become customers.

Two companies who already have government sanction monopolies just on coaxial cable systems, which are not monopolies on Media, Internet, nor phones. They do not compete against each other. They have at least 2 other major competitors in each market. How merging going to create "a fuck-off virtual monopoly later this year"?? Time Warner Cable doesn't even own any major media companies since it broke off from Time Warner Inc years ago, just a couple local news stations and NY1.

Baldr:
Two companies who already have government sanction monopolies just on coaxial cable systems, which are not monopolies on Media, Internet, nor phones. They do not compete against each other. They have at least 2 other major competitors in each market. How merging going to create "a fuck-off virtual monopoly later this year"?? Time Warner Cable doesn't even own any major media companies since it broke off from Time Warner Inc years ago, just a couple local news stations and NY1.

Just those "coaxial cable systems" comprise well over half the internet and TV service in the country.
You seriously don't see the problem here?

And they don't compete with each other because they SPECIFICALLY SET IT UP THAT WAY. As in, it's literally a cartel.

Court: FCC, you do not have jurisdiction over the internet so your new rules do not apply.
FCC: Okay, we'll just rephrase the rules then.
Court: Fine, so it seems we'll be seeing you again.

I wonder why the US doesn't classify the net in the same category as telephones etc, over here in Australia their grouped together and if you've got an issue with your ISP you go to the telecommunications ombudsman. What else would you classify it as?

Atmos Duality:

Baldr:
Two companies who already have government sanction monopolies just on coaxial cable systems, which are not monopolies on Media, Internet, nor phones. They do not compete against each other. They have at least 2 other major competitors in each market. How merging going to create "a fuck-off virtual monopoly later this year"?? Time Warner Cable doesn't even own any major media companies since it broke off from Time Warner Inc years ago, just a couple local news stations and NY1.

Just those "coaxial cable systems" comprise well over half the internet and TV service in the country.
You seriously don't see the problem here?

And they don't compete with each other because they SPECIFICALLY SET IT UP THAT WAY. As in, it's literally a cartel.

They compete against DSL, Satellite, Cellular, and a ton of different Fiber companies out there. EVERY MARKET both companies have AT LEAST two different competitors, that is not a monopoly.

Baldr:

They compete against DSL, Satellite, Cellular, and a ton of different Fiber companies out there. EVERY MARKET both companies have AT LEAST two different competitors, that is not a monopoly.

"A ton of different fiber companies."

"A ton"?
Well I sure don't see any around here, and I live in one of the largest cities on the fucking continent!

The US lags behind most of the developed world in throughput because of this crap, and the best thing you have to dismiss this is "It's technically not monopoly"? Well it certainly behaves like one!

Saying that DSL, Cellular and Satellite "compete" in the broadband market is like saying the Presidential election isn't really a two party race because TECHNICALLY there are some Independents in the mix. They're hilariously outclassed for performance and market share by cable.

I'm on DSL just because it costs a quarter of the absurd rate Comcast is asking for, with speeds that would have been laughed out of the European Union in 2007.

Tradjus:
It's possible that if big cable internet companies take advantage of this situation too restrict the internet, new cable internet companies could rise on the premise of maintaining net neutrality, and thrive based on that, overtaking the old guard who wouldn't be able to compete without essentially backtracking, something companies are loathe too do.

doesnt really matter in the end you will have major search engines doctoring results so you get what advertisers want you to receive rather than the best source of info

Adam Jensen:
We'll see how that goes. FCC is notoriously populated by corporate lobbyists who do more for the corporations than they do for the consumers. Meanwhile in Europe: http://gigaom.com/2014/01/23/net-neutrality-just-got-a-boost-in-europe-thanks-to-a-consumer-rights-committee/

That's right. Europe doesn't try to destroy everything just so a few companies can make a few more bucks. God damn the US crony fuckin' capitalism and anti-free market politics. How do Americans still put up with that shit?

the politicians can effectively shut down the government if they dont like the laws being passed because how dare people like different things than what they got bribed for. American politicians are too busy acting like kids in kindergarden to take care of this mess.

Atmos Duality:
I'm on DSL just because it costs a quarter of the absurd rate Comcast is asking for, with speeds that would have been laughed out of the European Union in 2007.

US internet in a nutshell

Why on Earth wouldn't they appeal it?! Whatever... Since when has any part of the government made rational decisions? I do like this bit though:

Wheeler will also be pushing local governments to build their own broadband networks, which would put pressure on large telcos to keep speeds high and prices low.

I'm still infuriated that it wasn't done sooner. The internet has become a vital utility in most peoples' lives. To allow its sole proprietorship to private corporations was a terrible idea, as we've seen with the development of the current cartel. Though to be fair, it existed before all of this in the form of the old telephone company behemoths...

They better hurry up, providers are already throttling Netflix and Hulu. God knows what will happen if Comcast and Time Warner manage to complete their unholy summoning ritual.

I wonder if Netflix is going to get into this fight, they are the most likely to be hurt by throttling.

 

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