34 Cities in Talks for Google Fiber Internet Access

34 Cities in Talks for Google Fiber Internet Access

Google is talking with 34 cities about bringing Google Fiber access to their communities.

Google Fiber Logo Square

With Google Fiber under construction or up and running in Kansas City, Provo, and Austin, Google is now looking to the next phase of its broadband Internet access rollout.

A new post on the official Google Fiber blog details the next phase, as Google has commenced talks with "cities in nine metro areas around the U.S.-34 cities altogether-to work with us to explore what it would take to bring them Google Fiber." Google should have more information on which of these areas will get Google Fiber infrastructure by the end of the year. If some of these cities do not end up going the Google Fiber route, Google says every area on the list "will be more prepared for us or any provider who wants to build a fiber network."

The nine major metropolitan areas include Portland, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, San Antonio, Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham. The list, if all nine areas hop on the Google Train, would make a dozen metropolitan areas with access to Google Fiber. Adding these to a (hopefully) growing list of cities and towns that are exploring gigabit Internet, Google-branded or not, and the premise of cheaper and faster Internet access across the country could become a reality sooner than expected. Portland and Nashville, both on the Google Fiber list, have already made gigabit Internet access a priority, while Los Angeles (not on the list) and others are pursuing city-wide Internet access as well.

With all the recent chatter about net neutrality and how telecommunication companies will approach an "open Internet," seeing local governments pursuing Google Fiber and alternatives is a breath of fresh air, for sure.

Are you already a Google Fiber customer? How's the experience been so far? Let us all know in the comments.

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Devin Connors:
The nine major metropolitan areas include Portland, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, San Antonio, Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham.

Score! Bring me all the tasty bandwidth.

bane can tell you how important fiber is:

anyways, i am sure there is still this bad feeling on everyones mind about giving a data hungy monstrocity that is google even more data or easier access to it.

As someone living in Kansas City (which I believe was the first city to get Google Fiber) I'm still waiting for it to get out to my area. The problem is that it literally goes from neighborhood to neighborhood, block to block. You have to get your neighborhood together and get them to all sign a petition saying "We want Google Fiber now, damnit!" before Google will deign to consider hooking your neighborhood up.

Moral of the story: even if your city gets picked as the next one, chances are you're still going to be waiting a good long while before you see it near you. :P

I hope and pray they eventually get their foot into Chicagoland.
And you can bet the ISP oligopoly giants (soon to be virtual monopoly giant Comcast) are going to fight this tooth and nail.

rhizhim:
anyways, i am sure there is still this bad feeling on everyones mind about giving a data hungy monstrocity that is google even more data.

Well, let's put it this way. At this point, better Google than those terrible ISP's who hold an insufferable monopoly on an area.

I will move just give me that sweet fiberoptic isp

I really hope it comes here to Philly one day.

Slycne:

Devin Connors:
The nine major metropolitan areas include Portland, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, San Antonio, Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham.

Score! Bring me all the tasty bandwidth.

Atlanta is on the list too! SQUEE!

DLin' Steam games in two minutes, like a boss.

Would be nice to have this in Rural Vermont.

Or, really, any speed greater than 80kb/s would be swell. Pretty please?

Yay it's coming to Phoenix! :D

So excited for this now that it's coming here, so maybe it will be super awesome and I can drop my current provider.

Well, verizon, comcast and AT&T will soon put a stop to all this.

Slycne:

Devin Connors:
The nine major metropolitan areas include Portland, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, San Antonio, Nashville, Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh-Durham.

Score! Bring me all the tasty bandwidth.

I'm right there with you, bring me that good internet service this area seems to lack!

hurry up with that fiber, as soon as its available in san jose im jumping ship from comcast

I'm happy for all those people getting the good interwebz that are in this thread...if you'll excuse me I'll be in the corner, crying because the highest internet in my area is only 5mbps...and that costs us $170 a month...>.>

Atmos Duality:
I hope and pray they eventually get their foot into Chicagoland.

I do to fellow Chicago-dweller. It's not entirely surprising though. If they tried to do anything in the heavily-developed areas of Chicago (or perhaps just downtown, I'm not 100% sure) there's a nightmare of tunnels at varying depths which make doing anything below ground difficult to say the least. Apparently most of it is tunnels from back when we were a rail hub, or at least that's what I've heard. And we don't even have light rail systems left to show for it. Damn motor corporations for buying all that stuff up and tearing it out.

Welp, at least the bus system is pretty good. Even if it smells kinda... well, you know, in certain areas.

Please come release us from the over-priced iron grip of Comcast. Please?!?

Atmos Duality:
I hope and pray they eventually get their foot into Chicagoland.

I feel ya. It seems like they're targeting all the cities except the big three; NY, Chicago, and LA. I'd think it would be easiest in those areas.

Quazimofo:

I do to fellow Chicago-dweller. It's not entirely surprising though. If they tried to do anything in the heavily-developed areas of Chicago (or perhaps just downtown, I'm not 100% sure) there's a nightmare of tunnels at varying depths which make doing anything below ground difficult to say the least. Apparently most of it is tunnels from back when we were a rail hub, or at least that's what I've heard. And we don't even have light rail systems left to show for it. Damn motor corporations for buying all that stuff up and tearing it out.

I've done freelance computer and network work in the city.
Let me just say, most working infrastructure I've encountered looks outdated by design.
For the most part, they're just being cheap and lazy.

I still saw routers from the mid 90s in operation back in 2008.
(I've been inside the "wiring closest" of the Sears Willis Tower. HO-LY FUCK. It's like Shelob's lair, if Shelob was made of CAT5)

Living_Brain:

I feel ya. It seems like they're targeting all the cities except the big three; NY, Chicago, and LA. I'd think it would be easiest in those areas.

Dirty old city built on dirty old politics.
I suspect the Chicago city planners are bent over a barrel enough to say no to laying fiber down for us Plebians. (I know for a fact that a fiber network is being built further west out of town. I've done some surveying for it.)

Living_Brain:

I feel ya. It seems like they're targeting all the cities except the big three; NY, Chicago, and LA. I'd think it would be easiest in those areas.

I don't think they can squeeze into LA because AT&T, Verizon, and Cox Digital have a subsidy monopoly over California, and they've blocked Google Fibre from coming to California in the past as well.

Atmos Duality:

Dirty old city built on dirty old politics.
I suspect the Chicago city planners are bent over a barrel enough to say no to laying fiber down for us Plebians. (I know for a fact that a fiber network is being built further west out of town. I've done some surveying for it.)

I guess Rahm won't help the issue either. Oh well, a man can dream of a day. Speaking of which, would you happen to know the amount of money it would take to bring our infrastructure up to date?

Neronium:

I don't think they can squeeze into LA because AT&T, Verizon, and Cox Digital have a subsidy monopoly over California, and they've blocked Google Fibre from coming to California in the past as well.

That's actually quite depressing.

Living_Brain:

That's actually quite depressing.

It's because the major ISPs in the US have an Oligopoly over the industry and pretty much won't let something that can be cheaper and way better than what they provide get through.

Neronium:
It's because the major ISPs in the US have an Oligopoly over the industry and pretty much won't let something that can be cheaper and way better than what they provide get through.

Well, Google has done it before and I'm sure that if they can't, we will pressure our own ISPs to provide such service. It prolly won't work though, since we can't boycott our internet; we'd go mad.

Living_Brain:

I guess Rahm won't help the issue either. Oh well, a man can dream of a day. Speaking of which, would you happen to know the amount of money it would take to bring our infrastructure up to date?

No idea. That scale of budgeting is way out of my league.
I've done SOHO and small campus design.

All I know is that I've seen fucktons of Fiber Cable spools laying around the dregs west of the burbs and north of Aurora.
They were laying it down before our early winter hit and froze the ground. (incidentally: frost depth of over 4 feet this winter. No matter water mains are breaking every week!)

Irridium:
Would be nice to have this in Rural Vermont.

Or, really, any speed greater than 80kb/s would be swell. Pretty please?

I'm in the same boat. In Rural Texas, have to use Wireless Internet. 113 Kbps is my max download speed.

But hey, if I was to move to Austin, I might be able to get Google Fiber sometime in 2017 when the infrastructure is finally completed!

Just in time for every game I want to play online right now to be either shut down or the population so small that it's not worth playing anymore!

No New York?
Why?
I appreciate that the 12 people who live in those 12 places need internet too, but still.

So Google aren't happy with getting everyone to use their servers - now they want to own our infrastructure too?
I like the idea of faster internet as much as the next guy, but Google already have the world at their fingertips - and to quote Harvey Dent aka Two-Face, "You either die a hero, or live long enough to see yourself become the villain."

So some places may not be run by monopoly only ISPs? people will start getting decent internet (even if still overpaying for it, google fiber is expensive). I can see good things from this.

Atmos Duality:
I hope and pray they eventually get their foot into Chicagoland.
And you can bet the ISP oligopoly giants (soon to be virtual monopoly giant Comcast) are going to fight this tooth and nail.

The sad thing is, when google wanted to roll in fiber in some town where there were 3man olygopoly around they actually sued google for being too good at competition and won bannign google fiber from the town. because offering better services is illegal.

We had dial-up until just 5 years ago so maybe in another 5 years maybe I could hope for fiber. It really sucks living in a rural isolated area. We have neither fast internet in any shape or form nor cell phone service.

I'm split in two on this topic. On one hand, I'm all for competition and there needs to be innovation in the stagnant field that is internet service providers. But, on the other hand, I will never see google fiber for at least a decade considering I live in the rural midwest.

Arnoxthe1:

rhizhim:
anyways, i am sure there is still this bad feeling on everyones mind about giving a data hungy monstrocity that is google even more data.

Well, let's put it this way. At this point, better Google than those terrible ISP's who hold an insufferable monopoly on an area.

Yeah, Google is already gathering all the data, far more than any ISP could. What's really important here is that they haven't done something insane with that data (yet) and that this action is making the world a better place.

I actually don't even think this gives them access to any more data than they already have and while conspiracy theories are fun, it is in Google's best interest as a company not to alienate customers. So why would they do something bad? The thing that they offer with all that data is targetted advertisement. One day, we will live in a time where men no longer get ads for things like tampons or products resolving menstrual cramps. The data is far more useful for advertising than criminal endeavors and I personally don't mind getting more tech and gaming ads than shit I couldn't care less about. I get that other people dislike their data being out there, but such is the nature of the internet. Most people can find out your name, phone number, house address and a few other things just from an email address if they wanted to.

 

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