Code Liberation Foundation Working to Fix Sexism in Games

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Code Liberation Foundation Working to Fix Sexism in Games

Code Liberation Foundation at IndieCade East 2014

Code Liberation Foundation plans to "woman up" and inspire aspiring female programmers and gamemakers.

The four women of Code Liberation Foundation got together with the aim of providing safe spaces for women to learn how to code. At IndieCade East they spoke about their shared experiences growing up with media that discouraged their voices and how they plan to change video games' image problem. Their solution - teach women how to code and that their voices are important.

Code Liberation Foundation's Catt Small, Phoenix Perry, Jane Friedhoff, and Nina Freeman are all women who were interested in programming at a young age but were discouraged from the field before college. They're now all back to making games and hope to fix the damage that prevents women from entering the field.

In her portion of the talk, Perry delivered harsh statistics. A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women. In games programming specifically, women make up four percent.

Perry believes advertising is the cause behind the change decline in the 1990s. At this time, companies were heavily advertising personal computers, targeting men as family breadwinners. She displayed numerous misogynistic ads, one of which read, "Don't feel bad, our servers won't go down on you either." Game companies had similar ads, and one depicted a man handing a crying woman a tissue with his foot because he was too busy playing a game.

Small explained to the audience that as a woman growing up during this time, media fed her messages that women lie, fight over men, and exist to have a family. She pointed to covers of Cosmopolitan and said, "Society pushes us to be this amazing, sexy, tiny goddess who does nothing but have sex and know the perfect moves for her guy and the perfect style." In comparison, Perry showed an issue of Cosmopolitan from 1967 that featured a female programmer.

The problem continues today. Perry pointed to several gaming advertisements, such as a Sony ad that compared the PlayStation Vita to a woman with four breasts. Perry says it's time to fix this image problem, but how? "We undo the damage," Perry answers. "We woman up."

Code Liberation offers free classes for women on GameMaker, Unity, HTML, openFrameworks, and Processing. At IndieCade East, Friedhoff led an all-day Processing workshop. The organization holds most of its classes at NYU's MAGNET Center in Brooklyn, NY, and plans to hold an upcoming C++ course, workshop about making games for the Kinect, and an online series for women outside of New York City. In addition, Code Liberation's slides from workshops are available to view for free.

Code Liberation also works to inspire young girls to code and express their voices. Freeman's passion for teaching high school girls comes from the fact that computer science courses in secondary education have declined since 17 percent since 2005 and that only 18.6 percent of the students who took the AP Computer Science exam last year were women. Freeman teaches classes at a Brooklyn all-girls high school. Students who largely had never programmed before had the opportunity to make prototypes of small games, often drawing from their own experiences.

"I want to show [girls] that their voices are just as important as anyone else's," Freeman said.

By teaching women how to make their own games, Code Liberation Foundation plans to leave no coder behind. Classes are geared toward beginners with no prior experience whether you're in high school or long out of college.

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Nice! ^_^
totally on board with this shit, that's my jam!

Awesome. More women need to get into gaming as a whole but it's never gonna happen if gaming as a whole keeps maintaining an atmosphere of hostility towards the concept of having a vagina.

Well, I am currently studying computer science and the amount of female students is really(!) low. While it is changing, it'll still take quite some time.
I think a big problem with such jobs in general are the stereotypes that are attached to them. They make a lot of people not even consider them, even though they'd might like them.

i am all for this :3

i fiddled a bit with coding and silly things like RPGmaker, and while fun, i don't think full on game design is my thing (it took me like 2 weeks to figure out how to do just an intro cut scene XD) but i'd always love to write for a game one day...

oh well, science for now, bioengeineering later, and if i have time, i don't see why not learn a bit of programming, never know when you can use it :3

Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

Great! So, when are game companies gonna get labor unions?

Objectable:
Great! So, when are game companies gonna get labor unions?

probably the same time that KFC will , when hell freezes over.

I do have some issues with how the article is written. The organization isn't actually claiming they're going to "fix" sexism in games, they just want more female representation in programming roles. The majority programming jobs are not game development positions.

It also doesn't address the obvious divide between gender representation in a real world company and gender representation in a product. A 50% male and 50% female company could still create a game with a sexist representation of women in it, or at least what people perceive as sexist. kinucakes.tumblr.com/‎ was drawing sexy women long before Skullgirls existed.

Ranting about sensational headlines aside, Code Liberation Foundation seems to really understand the problem and they're tackling it head on. More women should get into programming roles if they want to, and their unwillingness to enter technology roles is largely a perception problem, and they want to change that and provide an environment to foster that.

This is very good IMO, and I'll probably donate next paycheck.

This is actually a good solution. I support these ladies all the way.

TheSniperFan:
Well, I am currently studying computer science and the amount of female students is really(!) low. While it is changing, it'll still take quite some time.
I think a big problem with such jobs in general are the stereotypes that are attached to them. They make a lot of people not even consider them, even though they'd might like them.

Which is ironic considering how the first person to make a working algorithm as Ada Lovelace, and many more women were a first into computer programming in general.

https://24.media.tumblr.com/e28c0760e07f72169365dd4878b53c87/tumblr_mzbbjw4NZO1qfsvcyo1_400.jpg

CriticalMiss:
Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

Tenmar:
To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

Only assuming that the only barriers that exist are ones created by laws.

I think the whole sexism in gaming thing is the new fashionable thing to talk about and don't really find it half as much an issue as it is made out. I do however think that programming and development of games is HUGELY dominated by men, so good for them. Maybe they can bring some new ideas to the table that aren't more 1st person military shooters.

Well I'll be. It's a breath of fresh air seeing everyone react so positively to this. And I will too! This is a fantastic way to fix the perceived sexism (I say perceive because I'm avoiding trying to say whether it is actually a problem or not) problems in character design and themes this industry has.

The best way to change an industry is from the inside.

See, this is the way it should be done! Great job, and I'm totally behind this.

Dragonbums:

TheSniperFan:
Well, I am currently studying computer science and the amount of female students is really(!) low. While it is changing, it'll still take quite some time.
I think a big problem with such jobs in general are the stereotypes that are attached to them. They make a lot of people not even consider them, even though they'd might like them.

Which is ironic considering how the first person to make a working algorithm as Ada Lovelace, and many more women were a first into computer programming in general.

https://24.media.tumblr.com/e28c0760e07f72169365dd4878b53c87/tumblr_mzbbjw4NZO1qfsvcyo1_400.jpg

Yeah it is strange how women get shoved out of a burgeoning industry that they helped create by men, exact same thing happened in the early days of cinema.

I agree with many people, this is a great thing to be done. Hopefully, this will turn out well, and other people will follow suit. This is one of those things that will take a long time before any fruits from the labor can be seen. But you got to start somewhere, and that start is usually small.

Well this is..odd, i mean for one they arent really talking about sexism, because lets be honest, there is nothing inherently sexist about any field of work, although i would agree that certain types of jobs are more common to be predominantly one gender or the other, as stereotypical as it may seem, there are more female hairstylists than male ones. So i dont think the industry is keeping the girls out, or making it harder for them on purpose, but rather that there has always been this social stigma of "Nerd", i mean we still havent gotten to a point where the stereotypical perception of a Nerd is a "unwashed, zit-ridden, horn-rim-glassed geek in a basement" is a thing of the past, its moved on since then, but many still think of it in these terms.

Add to that the statistic which im going to bet is rather false, in terms of percentage yes there might be less women in programming fields, but the industry as a whole, both gaming as well as other industries which revolve around computer sciences have exploded in size, just look at the number of development studios for video games alone, there are thrice the amount now than there were in 87, if the number is not even higher. So there are more women in the industry if you simply compare numbers, even if the statistic shows otherwise because there is also a much higher number of males in these fields.

In the end though, its still a good thing, the problem really is the whole stereotype and perception issue that is attached to some job fields, so if they can get more women to be interested in working in these industries its a good thing, but its not going to fix "sexism" when it comes to character portrayals in media because, lets be obvious here, in most cases these characters are idealizations of females or males. Look at Barbie which is essentially a massively idealized, unrealistic portrayal of a woman, and thats a doll marketed towards little girls mostly. The only thing that is sure to happen if more female developers get into the industry is that there will be more eyecandy aimed towards women. The rest is speculation at best.

Meanwhile in the female coal miners movement allot of crickets gathered. I always have to laugh when we need a safe place for anyone to learn something. Sure there is nothing that rubs me the wrong way here, it's a nice sentiment but it just makes me laugh reading that one sentence every time.

"A safe place" because real life is always safe. Not to mention the MANY professions women have absolutely 0% interest in alleviating sexism in like miners, oil rig workers, garbage disposal, mechanical repair, lumber jacking, sewage maintenance, farming, the list literally goes on. No the men can keep those jobs.

We want to equalize the jobs that involve no nasty stuff and make lots of money, because it's always sexism that prevents women from joining those professions and never personal interest, free choice or inherent ability (you ain't gonna find many women who happily want to get coal lung compared to men).

Let's face it. There is no inherent sexism in any field and the escapist should feel ashamed that not only are they shamelessly turning into a kotaku click baiter, they also misrepresent the ideas behind this group which are far less about inherent sexism and more about the media's effect on social behaviour and the attitude towards discouraging certain types of professions based on gender... wait it's women only... forget what I said, you basically encapsulate exactly what they were about.

Now if you will excuse me I have to fight the inherent sexism present in midwifes! We need more men staring down the vagina's of women as they deliver babies!

This sounds amazing. I wish I could partake in these classes, but I don't have the right genitalia :(

I hope men are allowed as well, because where I live, we aren't exactly bursting at the seams with game developer courses at the schools, and it would be nice to see more of these courses/programs be made available to ALL aspiring developers and not just the ones who don't identify with having a penis.

EDIT: But to be clear, I do support this. I would rather have more people and potential friends to work with that can feel just as comfortable as I do doing whatever I can do with me.

Oh dear god YES. Fucking this is all I wanted! I don't even care how whiny any of the people involved in this may or may not be, I'm just glad they're focusing on making stuff BETTER, rather than coming up with bullshit reasons for why things are the way they are and making it sound more villainous than it is in reality.

I'm working to become a game designer, and I really, really want to have women to work with, under and above in my career. Hell I wouldn't mind being outnumbered by women; that's what I love about deviantArt.

Hopefully, people, stuff like this will make the you-know-who's of the internet completely obsolete once and for all.

Tenmar:

CriticalMiss:
Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

For Critical Miss's comment, even if it's a case that programming is just attracting WAY more male programmers while female programmers remain at roughly the same level, it should still raise the question why so many dudes are flocking to the job but not women. i.e. even if they aren't being driven out why aren't they coming in?

In response to Tenmar, no there isn't anything stopping women from becoming programmers from a strictly legal perspective. These discussions are, and have been for quite some time, about the how environment tends to treat women, and about the way society establishes expected interests for women and men.

Men are expected to be into programming because being techy is a "guy" thing. Women are expected to have extensive knowledge about makeup instead. Don't believe me? Look at kid's toys, girls get dolls with a bunch of pastel colored outfits, boys get trucks that turn into freaking robots. We're literally pushing the mechanical/technical aspect on boys while teaching girls that beauty is more important for them.

And it's not that being into makeup or cooking is wrong, but when society is being dominated by technology it is important that we aren't setting up people to avoid what can be such an important career on a both a personal and societal level. So when you consider that we are actively disincentivizing girls from pursuing technical hobbies as children, and making them feel uncomfortable in the programming field as an adult, the we have a seriously long way to go before there are actually no "barriers".

CriticalMiss:
Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

Pretty much what I was going to bring up; she lists percentages but not hard numbers and this could be skewing the actual data.

thaluikhain:

Tenmar:
To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

Only assuming that the only barriers that exist are ones created by laws.

While I'm not denying sexism exists, in most business places they don't care about your gender as much as you think. They do what they can to hire the best qualified candidate, because going through the hiring process costs businesses a lot of money. Now if you're talking about getting the education, the only thing stopping a girl (aside from tuition) are any pre-conceived doubts she may have. If she wants it, she should muscle through it.

Even though this fills in with all the sexism in gaming shit, it's a lot more logical than what Sharkeesian is trying to do. These ladies have the right idea on how to change things.

1337mokro:
Meanwhile in the female coal miners movement allot of crickets gathered. I always have to laugh when we need a safe place for anyone to learn something. Sure there is nothing that rubs me the wrong way here, it's a nice sentiment but it just makes me laugh reading that one sentence every time.

"A safe place" because real life is always safe. Not to mention the MANY professions women have absolutely 0% interest in alleviating sexism in like miners, oil rig workers, garbage disposal, mechanical repair, lumber jacking, sewage maintenance, farming, the list literally goes on. No the men can keep those jobs.

Which is, of course, why women are still fighting to get greater acceptance in place like the military.

And, as it happens, the coal mining industry. And farming. Big moves about women in the Australian coal industry. Farming always has had women involved, so that's not such an issue.

My problem is that "sexism" is used as the root cause of any of these numbers being less than 50%, and claiming anyone who disagrees it's sexism are themselves sexist. That's how it started about 5 years ago, people started showing up, said "sexism is the problem here" made all gamers the "bad guy", and try to validate their opinions by saying anyone who disagrees is the problem.

At my college the Interior Design courses were dominated by women...
Is it "sexism" that keeps the numbers of men down in that field?
Are they actively driving men out of the field?
Are women making an environment that makes men uncomfortable?
Do there need to be programs to get more men into interior design?

Existance of a majority doesn't automatically mean there's oppression from the majority.

"Woman up"?

Shouldn't they have done that years ago? Shouldn't they have said "fuck those stupid adds" and just gotten into the field anyway? Or does "woman up" mean getting other peoples money so you can spent it on doing your own thing away from the real world?

*sigh* Whatever, if this gets us some interesting games then fine. I hope they can invent some new genres, see what their girly brains can come up with.

My money is on it sucking just like everything else though.

Nurb:
My problem is that "sexism" is used as the root cause of any of these numbers being less than 50%, and claiming anyone who disagrees it's sexism are themselves sexist. That's how it started about 5 years ago, people started showing up, said "sexism is the problem here" made all gamers the "bad guy", and try to validate their opinions by saying anyone who disagrees is the problem.

At my college the Interior Design courses were dominated by women...
Is it "sexism" that keeps the numbers of men down in that field?
Are they actively driving men out of the field?
Are women making an environment that makes men uncomfortable?
Do there need to be programs to get more men into interior design?

Existance of a majority doesn't automatically mean there's oppression from the majority.

Well, to answer one of those questions... yes, it is sexism that's keeping the numbers of men down in the field of Interior Design; it's not perceived as a 'manly' job to undertake, and as such it's common to be looked down upon for entering the field instead of doing something 'manly' like sports or mining or construction. Similar to how there's piss-all men in Child Care, Social Services, Psychology, Fashion (though that's at least American/Australian; Fashion seems pretty gender-equal in Europe), etc... it's just not seen as a 'man's' job, and as such men are discouraged from entering these careers thanks to the wonderful stupidity that is sexism and societal pressure.

So, yes, it is Sexism that keeps the number of men down in the field of Interior Design. Since I'm not an interior designer I can't really tell you if women are actively driving men out of the field or making it an uncomfortable place, but as you yourself say - Existence of a Majority doesn't automatically mean there's oppression from the majority. Societal pressures can influence the internal workings of a field by a titanic amount, with any internal pressures being amplified by those same external forces - both of which DO exist in the gaming community (female gamers/developers are rarely taken seriously and need to 'justify' their gamerness while at the same time programming and development is considered a 'man's' job), which tends to be why there aren't many girls in the gaming industry.

(as a side note: Women have been discussing sexism in gaming for something like the last 25 years, it's only recently that it's become a more popularized issue thanks to the internet allowing a larger audience to be reached)

Stevepinto3:

Tenmar:

CriticalMiss:
Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

For Critical Miss's comment, even if it's a case that programming is just attracting WAY more male programmers while female programmers remain at roughly the same level, it should still raise the question why so many dudes are flocking to the job but not women. i.e. even if they aren't being driven out why aren't they coming in?

In response to Tenmar, no there isn't anything stopping women from becoming programmers from a strictly legal perspective. These discussions are, and have been for quite some time, about the how environment tends to treat women, and about the way society establishes expected interests for women and men.

Men are expected to be into programming because being techy is a "guy" thing. Women are expected to have extensive knowledge about makeup instead. Don't believe me? Look at kid's toys, girls get dolls with a bunch of pastel colored outfits, boys get trucks that turn into freaking robots. We're literally pushing the mechanical/technical aspect on boys while teaching girls that beauty is more important for them.

And it's not that being into makeup or cooking is wrong, but when society is being dominated by technology it is important that we aren't setting up people to avoid what can be such an important career on a both a personal and societal level. So when you consider that we are actively disincentivizing girls from pursuing technical hobbies as children, and making them feel uncomfortable in the programming field as an adult, the we have a seriously long way to go before there are actually no "barriers".

Umm... what? As someone who's getting into program himself, that's definitely not the case. No one is "pushing" programming on anybody. In fact, as my teacher herself has said, programmers are usually viewed as "nerds" and "social outcasts" in popular culture. That's starting to change a bit with the swell of the job market, but there's certainly no sexism in the market whatsoever. As an example, the only reason my teacher went into the field was because she really liked programming, there was nothing whatsoever that inhibited her interest in that field. Hell, our teacher even asked us why we decided to get into programming and the few female students in our class had pretty much the same reasons as the guys wanted to. They were pretty average too, especially when compared to some of the neckbeards that were in the class. So just because a kid plays with transformers that isn't going to make them any more likely to get into programming, I'm not sure how someone can come to that conclusion.

Shanicus:

Nurb:
My problem is that "sexism" is used as the root cause of any of these numbers being less than 50%, and claiming anyone who disagrees it's sexism are themselves sexist. That's how it started about 5 years ago, people started showing up, said "sexism is the problem here" made all gamers the "bad guy", and try to validate their opinions by saying anyone who disagrees is the problem.

At my college the Interior Design courses were dominated by women...
Is it "sexism" that keeps the numbers of men down in that field?
Are they actively driving men out of the field?
Are women making an environment that makes men uncomfortable?
Do there need to be programs to get more men into interior design?

Existance of a majority doesn't automatically mean there's oppression from the majority.

Well, to answer one of those questions... yes, it is sexism that's keeping the numbers of men down in the field of Interior Design; it's not perceived as a 'manly' job to undertake, and as such it's common to be looked down upon for entering the field instead of doing something 'manly' like sports or mining or construction. Similar to how there's piss-all men in Child Care, Social Services, Psychology, Fashion (though that's at least American/Australian; Fashion seems pretty gender-equal in Europe), etc... it's just not seen as a 'man's' job, and as such men are discouraged from entering these careers thanks to the wonderful stupidity that is sexism and societal pressure.

So, yes, it is Sexism that keeps the number of men down in the field of Interior Design. Since I'm not an interior designer I can't really tell you if women are actively driving men out of the field or making it an uncomfortable place, but as you yourself say - Existence of a Majority doesn't automatically mean there's oppression from the majority. Societal pressures can influence the internal workings of a field by a titanic amount, with any internal pressures being amplified by those same external forces - both of which DO exist in the gaming community (female gamers/developers are rarely taken seriously and need to 'justify' their gamerness while at the same time programming and development is considered a 'man's' job), which tends to be why there aren't many girls in the gaming industry.

(as a side note: Women have been discussing sexism in gaming for something like the last 25 years, it's only recently that it's become a more popularized issue thanks to the internet allowing a larger audience to be reached)

I think that's mainly because a somewhat large majority of female gamers are predominately into mobile games, the "casual" crowd one would say. A lot of "hardcore" gamers don't consider "casual" gamers actual gamers.

Stevepinto3:

For Critical Miss's comment, even if it's a case that programming is just attracting WAY more male programmers while female programmers remain at roughly the same level, it should still raise the question why so many dudes are flocking to the job but not women. i.e. even if they aren't being driven out why aren't they coming in?

I would guess for the same reason that there aren't as many female mathmaticians or physicists. Or in general just not so many women pursuing carreers in the natural sciences.
There just aren't as many women interested in this stuff.
Just as there aren't that many men interested in social sciences, for example.
Don't get me wrong, i fully support this thing and think that it's great to offer an easier way for women who are interested in this stuff. I just don't expect the number of female programmers to rival those of male programmers anytime soon.
I am studying computer science myself and the number of female students here is really low. Not only that but the ones that do study it, study an mixture course between computer science and psychology.
But i would certainly love it if there were more women in this field. But you can trust me, i have never seen any hostility from the male students towards the female students whatsoever here. Quite the opposite in fact.

CriticalMiss:
Sounds kind of cool, but I wonder about this bit. they say:

A Bureau of Labor Statistics chart showed a decline in women programmers since 1991. In 1987, 42 percent of American programmers were women. Now only 25 percent of programmers are women

Now is that an actual decline in numbers or just a decline in proportion? It seems to me more likely that there are more female programmers today than in 87, whilst many more men got in to the market since then. So not really a decline in female programmers just that more men showed up over the years than women and skweing the proportions.

And I wonder how long it will be until there is a major studio with a mostly female programming team.

Oh, and the article really should have included a link to the CLF website.

http://codeliberation.org/

I'm not exactly sure why the hard numbers matter. I didn't get the impression that this article was trying to say that female programmers were being forced out of the industry. This significant decline in the proportion of female programmers is still pretty telling of some kind of discrepancy.

Tenmar:

To sorta add on to this. Another factor that is always either omitted or forgotten from the conversation is the freedom of choice and outcome of opportunity.

The ability to choose one's own career path is always open to people regardless of gender. There are no actual barriers the educational system has up that prevents a person choosing what classes they want to take based on gender. If women decide that they don't want to pursue a career in computer science or programming(to which as noted by Weaver that most programming jobs are not related to game development) it is usually because they either choose not to. You can't really complain about who your peers are in a career field when the imputes is on each individual.

As for the article yeah one again sensationalist click bait wins again. Good on the group for offering the tools but it will still be the individuals choice on what they want to do in the end. Especially when there aren't any barriers by the law or by gender that stops a women from pursuing a career in programming.

The very fact that the gender distribution in computer science has changed so drastically since 1987 strongly suggests otherwise. I'm pretty sure that the percentage of women didn't drop by half because the whole gender just stopped liking computer science on a whim. Sure women who want to study computer science have every opportunity to that men do, but they're given a lot more reasons and influences to discourage them from wanting to. Which is kind of what this article was talking about.

OT: I am actually surprised that the there used to be so many woman in computer science. It's both refreshing and disappointing. In my computer science classes I think I'd be generous saying that 10% of the population consists of women. I think initiatives like this are a good idea, giving people reasons and opportunities to get into computer science. Sadly mentioning any negatives in gaming relating to gender always summons up such seething vitriol from the community that it only serves to give women less reason to want to be a part of it.

Dragonbums:

TheSniperFan:
Well, I am currently studying computer science and the amount of female students is really(!) low. While it is changing, it'll still take quite some time.
I think a big problem with such jobs in general are the stereotypes that are attached to them. They make a lot of people not even consider them, even though they'd might like them.

Which is ironic considering how the first person to make a working algorithm as Ada Lovelace, and many more women were a first into computer programming in general.

https://24.media.tumblr.com/e28c0760e07f72169365dd4878b53c87/tumblr_mzbbjw4NZO1qfsvcyo1_400.jpg

That image a has at least one big fault.
Ada Lovelace did not invent the computer. I had to look it up, because I leaned something different during my studies.
Turns out I was right.
She was the first programmer, which frankly is quite a different thing.
The computer as we know it was essentially invented by Alan Turing.

This is all great but I disagree with the article when it says video games have an "image problem". Video games are more accepted than ever before in the mainstream and women are more represented than ever before. There is still not gender equality, but video games do not have an image problem.

I'm kind of surprised from this article.
Was "a special place that is safe and women can learn programming" even necessary ?
I mean... Don't universities just accept women ? And aren't they considered 'safe' places for people to be ?
It's weird... I personally know more women who have some knowledge of programming than men.
But most of them I know don't end up working on that,one is a saleswoman and another is working at a restaurant.
Once I asked the saleswoman why don't she try to make a small program or indie game and try her luck on that,and well she initially clammed up.In the end she seemed to be satisfied with her current job and thought that it didn't worth to spend her free time trying to do something related with building a software.
I'm all for women too learning how to make games,and start making them,it's just that I had the assumption that programming classes were already available for any woman that wants to participate and learn to code.

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