Steam Family Sharing is Now Avaliable

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Steam Family Sharing is Now Avaliable

Steam Family Sharing

You are now able to authorize 10 computers, and 5 user accounts to share your game library with.

Steam has announced that its Family Sharing system, which allows friends and family members to share games temporarily with each other, is now out of beta and in its first full release. "Lenders" are able to authorize up to ten computers, and five Steam accounts, who can then request to "borrow" a game for a period of time. The lender can lend a game to the "borrower," who has free reign of it until the lender wants it back, and which point the borrower must return it or purchase his own copy. If the borrower does purchase their own copy, their progress is carried over.

Before you go out and try to lend all your games to your buddies, there is a considerable downside to the service. There is absolutely no way for users to authorize an account remotely, meaning your buddy has to come over to your house and physically log into his Steam account from your machine in order to become a borrower.

For family members though, it should work perfectly, as you'll easily be able to lend out specific games without having to log out of your own Steam account.

When the beta for Family Sharing opened last year, Valve said the service "is designed for close friends and family members to play one another's Steam games while each earning their own Steam achievements and storing their own saves and application data to the Steam cloud."

Games with an additional third-party key cannot be shared between accounts, and regional restrictions will remain the same.

Source: Steam Community

Permalink

I don't think you quite understand how it works. You can't lend out specific games. Once you authorize a computer +account (which is easily done via teamviewer) that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in youe library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

I will be the first to say that this is rather reasonable approach to the sharing of games. The person logging into your account to become a borrower makes sense. Sure it limits your circle of shares. So I can't share with my buddy in IL or CA, but I could share with the guy that's 4 blocks down. My question is if MS had come out with this would people have accepted the Xbox One? No, I'm not trying to start a flames or anything else, I'm honestly asking if Xbox One was had such system would people still protest? Course Steam has the offline mode, but let's put that to the side for now. A sharing program with limited access and accessibility. Friend comes over and inputs there Xbox Live info and poof they can utilize your game library. No clue the duration of said borrowing nor the number of times available per game or user. The devs don't people constantly borrowing a game until they beat. No money in that. And can equally guess the friend won't like people just leeching games.

EDIT: Clicked the link to read the FAQ. Seems Steam must be online for you to share your library, so "always online". You cannot play games while someone is sharing your library, and only one person at a time can access said library.

That's some interesting news, I'll have to check it out.

In my household my father, stepmother, and I all have separate computers, and separate STEAM accounts, and have actually wound up buying the same game multiple times for ease of use. If this works like it sounds, it could be useful.

That said, one of the things that makes me wonder about the "number of computers" limit with STEAM in particular is whether these apply to an account pool in general, or just for that. As someone who has had several computers since he started using STEAM I've actually wondered what would happen if you hit a limit like that, if they are good about adding more, or if I could be left needing to play on an old computer for my STEAM account or lose everything, or what. Not sure if that applies here or not though. I've probably had like 5 personal computers at different times using my STEAM account over the years, maybe more.

Fireprufe15:
I don't think you quite understand how it works. You can't lend out specific games. Once you authorize a computer +account (which is easily done via teamviewer) that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in youe library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

Ahh I should have read this first. That sounds substantially less useful for my particular situation.

Team Viewer can be used to enable it remotely rather easily, (having done it myself).

Therumancer:
That's some interesting news, I'll have to check it out.

In my household my father, stepmother, and I all have separate computers, and separate STEAM accounts, and have actually wound up buying the same game multiple times for ease of use. If this works like it sounds, it could be useful.

That said, one of the things that makes me wonder about the "number of computers" limit with STEAM in particular is whether these apply to an account pool in general, or just for that. As someone who has had several computers since he started using STEAM I've actually wondered what would happen if you hit a limit like that, if they are good about adding more, or if I could be left needing to play on an old computer for my STEAM account or lose everything, or what. Not sure if that applies here or not though. I've probably had like 5 personal computers at different times using my STEAM account over the years, maybe more.

There's no limit to how many computers you can login to with your own account. I've gone through 20.

Well for now it's only use is to monitor your kids gaming, i.e. you have the credit card account for buying games and then share select games with your kids when you see fit and kick them off when you want.

But other then that it is the most awkward and clunky system imaginable.

I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

BartyMae:
Team Viewer can be used to enable it remotely rather easily, (having done it myself).

I think it's worth noting that using this workaround is still dangerous when sharing with people you don't trust, since it's entirely possible for someone to stop the remote program, change your email address and nick your account. Still, that's not something you need to worry about with friends and family.

OT: God fucking damnit, Steven. Six months after the initial accouncement and journalists like you are STILL giving people the impression that they can share games on an individual basis.

major_chaos:
I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

Seconded. I've known for months about the limitations of the service, so it's pretty annoying to see Steven spreading false information. Sorry Steven, I like most of your other articles, but the information you're giving is misleading.

Fireprufe15:
that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in [your] library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

Is this a Problem?

I think this will drive sales for multiplayer games

and if I wanted someone to take a look at say, Mass Effect I could give them the experience for free
given how many games I buy and never play like an idiot i think its a cool feature and I plan on using it
then again i'm not planning on enabling it with anyone outside my family

heroicbob:

Fireprufe15:
that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in [your] library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

Is this a Problem?

I think this will drive sales for multiplayer games

and if I wanted someone to take a look at say, Mass Effect I could give them the experience for free
given how many games I buy and never play like an idiot i think its a cool feature and I plan on using it
then again i'm not planning on enabling it with anyone outside my family

It's not a problem, I have been using family sharing myself for months now, I was just correcting the false info in the news post.

I would have prefered if I could choose wich games each person gets to play while I am free to play all the other games that I currently own. Kind of like how real life lending works.

josemlopes:
I would have prefered if I could choose wich games each person gets to play while I am free to play all the other games that I currently own. Kind of like how real life lending works.

You can play your games any time you want, it just kicks you friend out when you do.

josemlopes:
I would have prefered if I could choose wich games each person gets to play while I am free to play all the other games that I currently own. Kind of like how real life lending works.

You can play your games any time you want, it just kicks you friend out when you do.

Me and a friend experimented with this a bit last night. It's true that only one person can use a specific game library at a time, however if you both lend each other your libraries you can both play at the same time. I just have to play a game that's unique to his library, and he has to play one from mine. Then it works.

While I can understand Steam would want to limit this feature somewhat, this implementation is significantly less awesome than I originally thought.

Fireprufe15:

josemlopes:
I would have prefered if I could choose wich games each person gets to play while I am free to play all the other games that I currently own. Kind of like how real life lending works.

You can play your games any time you want, it just kicks you friend out when you do.

What I meant is that he would also be free to play the games I chose him to play, like if I picked Star Wars Battlefront 2 I couldnt play it untill I got it back but he could play all he wanted while I could still play the other games from my list.

Steven Bogos:
Steam Family Sharing is Now Avaliable

Steam Family Sharing

You are now able to authorize 10 computers, and 5 user accounts to share your game library with.

Steam has announced that its Family Sharing system, which allows friends and family members to share games temporarily with each other, is now out of beta and in its first full release. "Lenders" are able to authorize up to ten computers, and five Steam accounts, who can then request to "borrow" a game for a period of time. The lender can lend a game to the "borrower," who has free reign of it until the lender wants it back, and which point the borrower must return it or purchase his own copy. If the borrower does purchase their own copy, their progress is carried over.

Before you go out and try to lend all your games to your buddies, there is a considerable downside to the service. There is absolutely no way for users to authorize an account remotely, meaning your buddy has to come over to your house and physically log into his Steam account from your machine in order to become a borrower.

For family members though, it should work perfectly, as you'll easily be able to lend out specific games without having to log out of your own Steam account.

When the beta for Family Sharing opened last year, Valve said the service "is designed for close friends and family members to play one another's Steam games while each earning their own Steam achievements and storing their own saves and application data to the Steam cloud."

Games with an additional third-party key cannot be shared between accounts, and regional restrictions will remain the same.

Source: Steam Community

Permalink

I've been in the beta for this service for a little while, and you've got it kinda wrong. What Family Sharing allows is someone to use any game from your library as long as you're not using any games from you account at that time. Once you start up any game in your library, they get a notification telling them they have a minute or so to save and quit, or purchase the game.

Infernal Lawyer:

BartyMae:
Team Viewer can be used to enable it remotely rather easily, (having done it myself).

I think it's worth noting that using this workaround is still dangerous when sharing with people you don't trust, since it's entirely possible for someone to stop the remote program, change your email address and nick your account. Still, that's not something you need to worry about with friends and family.

Absolutely...but you shouldn't be trying to give access to people you don't trust to begin with, anyways.

Haha at people still getting GAME Sharing confused with LIBRARY Sharing. The (pretty much open?) beta for this has been going on for months - can't believe people still don't quite fully understand it...it takes literally about 2-3 minutes to figure out via Google. :(

Fireprufe15:
I don't think you quite understand how it works. You can't lend out specific games. Once you authorize a computer +account (which is easily done via teamviewer) that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in youe library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

Dammit, I was hoping that it had changed.

I actually came to the comments section to clarify.

I love steam family share. I use it mainly at is was intended at home for my mom and younger brothers to access my steam library whenever they want. I also traded info with two very close friends and share with them as well. This one is the most beneficial because we can take turns buying single player games that we are all interested in. Saves a lot of money.

Yeesh, lots of negativity here. I mean, sure, this isn't perfect, but so far (having used it in beta) I have found it to be incredibly useful. Not everyone will get something out of it, but for me, it's great.

BartyMae:

Infernal Lawyer:

BartyMae:
Team Viewer can be used to enable it remotely rather easily, (having done it myself).

I think it's worth noting that using this workaround is still dangerous when sharing with people you don't trust, since it's entirely possible for someone to stop the remote program, change your email address and nick your account. Still, that's not something you need to worry about with friends and family.

Absolutely...but you shouldn't be trying to give access to people you don't trust to begin with, anyways.

Obviously, but since when did that stop stupid greedy people looking for their free lunch?

Fireprufe15:
I don't think you quite understand how it works. You can't lend out specific games. Once you authorize a computer +account (which is easily done via teamviewer) that person has full access to your steam game library. When you play any game, they can't play any game in youe library. If they are busy playing and you start playing, even if not the same game, they get booted out.

So it's a TOS-friendly alternative to just giving your account details to someone you trust. Meh. I'd understand not being able to play the SAME game, but the entire library being off-limits is entirely ridiculous.

Steven Bogos:
There is absolutely no way for users to authorize an account remotely, meaning your buddy has to come over to your house and physically log into his Steam account from your machine in order to become a borrower.

Yeah, no way to do it remotely... a person's Steam account details are bound to their fingers...

I think this is a good start but I wish it were a little more robust. Why couldn't the some sharing be able to play their game for 10 days and allow you to keep using your Steam library and play any game but the one that other person is playing.

major_chaos:
I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

oh boy, the first digital distribution service to provide some sort of framework for lending games, how dare they!

And to think, Microsoft was going to implement a system like this except 10 times better. But then, ON NOES DRM!!11

DISCLAIMER: I, like everyone else, actually did want Microsoft to remove the DRM in the end. It just doesn't change the fact though that Microsoft was also catching on to something really big.

NuclearKangaroo:

major_chaos:
I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

oh boy, the first digital distribution service to provide some sort of framework for lending games, how dare they!

The implementation sounds pretty crap though. Say I shared with a friend who wanted to play Alan Wake and he was playing for a few hours he gets to the crow fight only to be booted in the middle of it because i wanted to play KOTOR or The Wolf Among us. That pretty lame system don't you think? I mean What if you do this to be cause you hoped to play MP matches using the system you'd be screwed.

Darks63:

NuclearKangaroo:

major_chaos:
I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

oh boy, the first digital distribution service to provide some sort of framework for lending games, how dare they!

The implementation sounds pretty crap though. Say I shared with a friend who wanted to play Alan Wake and he was playing for a few hours he gets to the crow fight only to be booted in the middle of it because i wanted to play KOTOR or The Wolf Among us. That pretty lame system don't you think? I mean What if you do this to be cause you hoped to play MP matches using the system you'd be screwed.

im not saying it couldnt be done better, but its a step in the right direction, i have confidence we will see the feature evolve in the future, just like every other steam feature

i just think major chaos attitude is pretty dumb, valve is taking an important step when it comes to digital distribution, its the first service to directly support lending digital games, steam being the biggest DD platform is also worth nothing, this move will hopefully force other digital distribution platforms to support lending digital games, i think we should remain critical yet optimistic, or at the very least shouldnt complain about free stuff

This is undoubtedly something done to make Big Picture, Steam OS and Steambox more useful, the sharing of accounts on a single screen in a single house. Not to properly "lend" games like you would if they were cartridges or discs. On the one hand, a shame. On the other... makes sense, I guess. Back to the other, though, a shame.

NuclearKangaroo:

major_chaos:
I was really excited and slightly baffled that Valve had finally given PC gamers the convenience of lending games. Then I actually read how this abortion works. That will teach me to be optimistic about Steam features.

oh boy, the first digital distribution service to provide some sort of framework for lending games, how dare they!

That's how I feel. This is the first time anything like this has ever been done and yet people are still bitching that it isn't perfect? You do know that when steam first released it wasn't even close to an optimal program and a ton of people hated it because it wouldn't work correctly most of the time.

I mean, this is pretty much the same thing as letting someone go on your account and play games, but instead they can't go into offline mode which would allow both people to play on the same library. However, this is still a huge step in the right direction. Who cares if it isn't optimal, it is still something. Hopefully valve will implement individual game sharing sometime, but until then I'm glad they're trying new things like this.

It baffles me how a company can do something that isn't anything except a good thing for the consumer yet the consumers still bitch and whine about it because its not exactly what they wanted.

It actually makes sense they way they did it, it's exactly like sharing your "insert console name" with ppl, you can't play it if they are and vice versa. They took the "you should be able share digital like physical copies" request literally, but like there was only 1 console in use.

I am disappointed in kicking out a person because you are going to play a game, its not an issue if its someone that uses your same computer, but with the amount of time that I am using Steam myself none of my friends will be able to share any of the games I own.

I was expecting something more of a lockout on the game so I couldn't play it until I reclaimed it from my friend, like how I would share a physical game.

CJ Schappert:
It actually makes sense they way they did it, it's exactly like sharing your "insert console name" with ppl, you can't play it if they are and vice versa. They took the "you should be able share digital like physical copies" request literally, but like there was only 1 console in use.

But that's not the way it works. If you have a console you can lend a game to a friend and still play the rest of your games, with Steam, if someone is playing one of your games you boot them if you play any of your games not just the one your friend is playing.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here