Veronica Mars Fan Fiction Will Be Published By Amazon

Veronica Mars Fan Fiction Will Be Published By Amazon

Veronica Mars

Veronica Mars cases written by loyal fans will soon earn 35% in royalties for their creators.

There is absolutely no doubt that when Veronica Mars ended in 2007, fan fiction writers picked up the torch and continued the story themselves. What these writers may not have expected was the possibility of earning real-world money for doing so. With the Veronica Mars movie release underway, the film's creators are expanding the franchise's scope with Amazon's Kindle Worlds. This allows Veronica Mars fan fiction to be published and sold across the internet, with a 35% cut in royalties going to the writers themselves.

"Veronica Mars fans are amazingly loyal and anything we can do to give them more access to her world and that of her character is great," Thomas said. "I'm looking forward to seeing what new worlds and characters are created by fans and Kindle Worlds writers."

Kindle Worlds has been publishing fan fiction for some time now, with Veronica Mars being the latest available franchise. That being said, Amazon won't accept just any Veronica Mars story; fan fiction must meet guidelines appropriate to its "World" before publication, which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes, or depicting characters after Veronica has left college.

In other words, if you've written an erotic tale where Veronica Mars and Tony Stark fight The War of the Worlds' Martians, Amazon needs you to give it an extensive edit. But if you're limiting the scope to an untold adventure at Neptune's Hearst College? Now you've got a very good chance of being paid for your efforts.

Source: Bleeding Cool

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which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

EDIT: Before you quote me and mention the Star Wars EU, please read my post below Re:Licensed Novels. Then quote me THERE and argue with that. I really don't need a fourth + person mentioning something I've already responded to.

Falterfire:

which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

I suspect there may be more demand than you think. The average person prefers to buy something they already know they'll like, rather than take a risk on something new. It's why both Hollywood and the video games industry churn out so many sequels and reboots.

Once fans of a series have already consumed everything produced by the original creator, fanfiction provides a way from them to keep getting new material based on the world and characters they already know and love.

For the record, I personally neither read nor write fanfiction and I have no particular interest in doing so.

35% is a decent margin, considering they've been writing this stuff for free all these years. Hopefully Amazon has decent quality standards so they can keep the quality of their fanfic above the usual dreck on the internet.

Falterfire:

which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

Pretty much every other medium than literature is already heavily "fanfiction" based, from Telltale's Walking Dead fanfiction to Sony's Spiderman fanfiction, Joss Whedon's Avengers fanfiction, to Moffat's Sherlock Homes fanfiction, etc.

They call it "an IP", and the law grants them control over it, that's somehow supposed to make it inherently different from actual fanfictions found "in the wild", but now that literature can also fall under the same control, it will just step in line, and we will get used to our literary universes being portioned by IP holders and commissioned to the actual artists who can't own their own work, like every other medium.

Alterego-X:

Falterfire:

which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

Pretty much every other medium than literature is already heavily "fanfiction" based, from Telltale's Walking Dead fanfiction to Sony's Spiderman fanfiction, Joss Whedon's Avengers fanfiction, to Moffat's Sherlock Homes fanfiction, etc.

They call it "an IP", and the law grants them control over it, that somehow makes it totally different from unregulated ones, but now that literature can also fall under the same control, it will just step in line, and we will get used to our literary universes being portioned by IP holders like every other medium.

Books have had publishers longer than anyone else. They're just, comparatively, hands off.

Alterego-X:
Pretty much every other medium than literature is already heavily "fanfiction" based, from Telltale's Walking Dead fanfiction to Sony's Spiderman fanfiction, Joss Whedon's Avengers fanfiction, to Moffat's Sherlock Homes fanfiction, etc.

They call it "an IP", and the law grants them control over it, that's somehow supposed to make it inherently different from actual fanfictions found "in the wild", but now that literature can also fall under the same control, it will just step in line, and we will get used to our literary universes being portioned by IP holders and commissioned to the actual artists who can't own their own work, like every other medium.

The biggest difference between regular licensed work and fanfiction is the level of oversight and quality control. Generally speaking fanfiction is trash not because derivative works are bad but because the effectively nonexistent barrier to publication means that anybody with a computer and even a tenuous grasp on their language of choice can hammer out a fanfiction story and post it with the same credibility as somebody who is a master writer who carefully edits their work with the help of others.

So if this is managed fanfiction with entries read before being approved by somebody connected to the brand the end result may actually be worthwhile. If it's just a 'submit what you want and we'll take down anything that violates our rules when we find out about it' situation you'll end up with a cesspit like most mobile app stores where going in after anything that wasn't specifically recommended to you is a fruitless endeavor.

Falterfire:

which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

There has been market for fanfiction for awhile. Take Star Wars for example... All those books and comic books not written by George Lucas are essentially fan fiction, they just happened to be published and allowed to make money off of.

kurupt87:

Books have had publishers longer than anyone else. They're just, comparatively, hands off.

Books usually had whatever publisher the writer *hired* to market their work, while keeping them in their personal copyright control.

So unlike movies or comic books or video games, books were largely NOT ordered by the publisher/owner to be written for a paycheck by the writer who is employed by them.

Falterfire:

The biggest difference between regular licensed work and fanfiction is the level of oversight and quality control.

Yeah, that's one theory. Though there are actually plenty of well-curated fanfiction repositories, and it's also relatively easy to self-publish nowadays anyways, maybe that stereotype is at the source of it.

I'd never pay money for fanfiction, or even read it for free for that matter (I could never read a non-canon story. Not only is it fiction, but it's fiction that didn't even happen in the context of its universe! I'd get depressed just trying to read it), but I guess if there's a market and if they receive permission from whoever holds the IP, then they can do whatever they want.

In terms of quality, not all of it can be shit, right? Still, get your grubby hands off Veronica Mars, you dirty fanfic writers... >_>

I dislike fan fiction. I approve of it as a tool for people becoming experienced with writing as trying to create your own setting, universe and characters can be daunting and it helps to wet your toes with something you're familiar with but I disapprove of selling it.

Falterfire:

which in this case prohibits pornographic content, crossovers with other fictional universes

Wait, after you remove those two what fanfiction is left?

Also, I completely understand the drive to write and publish fan-fiction, but I'm curious how much of a market there is to actually buy the stuff. Fanfiction always struck me as the only market with far far more producers than consumers.

You know those 8 million Star Wars Expanded Universe books you see in your bookstores sci-fi area? They're just doing the same thing as Lucas did with that ages and ages ago.

 

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