DC's Heroines Strut Their Stuff In These 1940's Pin-Up Posters

DC's Heroines Strut Their Stuff In These 1940's Pin-Up Posters

The classy prints show Wonder Woman as Rosie the Riveter and more.

Female superheroes don't have quite the same recognition that their male counterparts do. While the likes of Batman and Superman are easily recognized by the public at large, characters like Wonder Woman and Batgirl often seem like gender-swapped copies, not actual heroes in their own right. To rectify that, here's a series of posters depicting DC's powerful heroines in the style of classy pin-ups from the 1940's.

The prints come courtesy of Quantum Mechanix, the same guys behind the beautify art nouveau take on the ladies of Firefly. There are ten posters in all, each one a period advertisement. For example, Wonder Woman's posing in the style of Rosie the Riveter, while Catwoman's in an ad for the Gotham City Savings and Loan. Each one's a gorgeous work of art that include clever throwbacks to the characters.

This is the kind of stuff that belongs framed in a den. If you have room on your wall, each 18" x 24" print can be preordered from QMx for $14.95.

So, DC, how about that Wonder Woman movie, eh? It's about time these ladies got their due.

Source: Quantum Mechanix

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These are really good, but I've a bit of a nit-pick on the second one.

Dawn Wells (as Mary Ann) was forbidden from showing her navel when Gilligan's Island premiered in the 60's. Bare navel certainly wasn't featured in the art of the 40s.

But the rest are spectacular. :)

Pin-up posters are awesome...as they have a classier aesthetic than merely photographs of scantily clad females, they allow people to drool over attractive women without looking like total creeps. We should have more of these in general!

>_>

But, uh, yeah, they look good. I imagine that if I was into the whole comic book thing these would be pretty interesting.

*bookmarks website*

I'll be coming here in the near future (as in, next week, when I move into my new home) to get the Black Canary and Harley Quinn posters.

Yep, there's nothing as respectful to superheroines than depicting them as 1940s pin up glamour girls...

While the likes of Batman and Superman are easily recognized by the public at large, characters like Wonder Woman and Batgirl often seem like gender-swapped copies, not actual heroes in their own right. To rectify that, here's a series of posters depicting DC's powerful heroines in the style of classy pin-ups from the 1940's.

So, the idea is to... what, exactly? I'm not getting this, honestly.

Are Wonder Woman and Batgirl not easily recognizable somehow? When did this happen? How is throwing up pin-up styles of them going to refute or, as the article puts it, "rectify," the idea that they are "gender-swapped copies" of the male super heroes?

Remember when Harley Quinn wore a red and black jumpsuit? Or clothes at all, apparently...?

For me Black Canary, HawkGirl, Poison Ivy, and Wonder Woman are the best of the bunch but doesn't "She can do it!" seem rather patronising?

Also distancing them from being mere gender-swapped counterparts kind of falls flat when you feel the need to tell everyone that Supergirl is: "related to the world's most super man". Is being super in her own right not enough?

I actually really like these. Then again I am a sucker for 1940s era art. Its a shame that Cassandra Cain and Power Girl aren't included.

WHERE IS ZATANNA?! Please please please make one of Zatanna! I love her new bombshell statue that is getting released this year, and a pin-up poster would have went great with it! Plus, other than Black Canary, she is the most "Pin-up suitable" superhero there is!

As eye candy for us males to drool over, I approve!

As something that will make me finally take DC female superheroes as characters on their own seriously, not so much.

Between this and Goyer saying they don't have plans for a cohesive DC cinematic universe, it kinda sucks being a DC fan right now.

well at least is better then having "Disney Princesses as X" for the fiftieth time.

Of course they did because the DC heroines have not been objectified enough already.

Going to call BS since they are all presented as soft-core wank material completely invalidating Wonder Woman's poster in which she actually does look bad ass.

This:

ritchards:
Yep, there's nothing as respectful to superheroines than depicting them as 1940s pin up glamour girls...

Some okay art, but it sends a bit of a mixed message, and seems to completely nerf the source characters individual strengths (either as characters or simply their original designs).

MinionJoe:
These are really good, but I've a bit of a nit-pick on the second one.

Dawn Wells (as Mary Ann) was forbidden from showing her navel when Gilligan's Island premiered in the 60's. Bare navel certainly wasn't featured in the art of the 40s.

But the rest are spectacular. :)

I feel equally nit-picky to pick out that the world of television and the world of print are far removed from one another, and the standards applied to each weren't universal.

Hell, Playboy came into print in 1953, and showed a hell of a lot more than a navel.

Really like the Black Canary and Supergirl ones.

Did pin up poster girls from the 40's really show off that much skin?

It always comes back to "too much skin" doesn't it?

No power girl? much disappointment.

IanDavis:
While the likes of Batman and Superman are easily recognized by the public at large, characters like Wonder Woman and Batgirl often seem like gender-swapped copies, not actual heroes in their own right.

Batgirl and Wonder Woman isn't exactly comparable.. Batgirl is a female knockoff of Batman, while Wonder Woman is probably among the top 5 most iconic and well know superheroes on her own right.

Well, whoever drew it is certainly talented: not sure what the big fuss is, but they're nice at least.

Mcoffey:
Remember when Harley Quinn wore a red and black jumpsuit? Or clothes at all, apparently...?

Sucide Squad I think it was the first trade not sure thou, but Harley Quinn had some real clothes on, and damn did she look good. The poster is close to what she was wearing, but instead of the brown shorts and that jacket it was jean daisy dukes (look it up) and a flannel vest.

Some of these designs are quite old aren't they? I'm sure I've seen the Wonder Woman and Harley Quinn before, and I'm almost certain there's a statue of Poison Ivy just like the picture.

That being said, these are still pretty neat. I've got a real soft spot for 40's pinup styles.

ritchards:
Yep, there's nothing as respectful to superheroines than depicting them as 1940s pin up glamour girls...

4th post in... I wondered how many posts it'd be before someone made a comment like that. My guess was 3 posts, I was only one off.

I do see the wider point about respecting women and not simply seeing them as objects to be drooled over, however as a humble consumer of all manners of perversions, pornography and slightly lewd art, I take offence at the idea that you think I (and men like me) can't separate the enjoyable aesthetic of 1940s pinup Black Canary (or indeed, any depiction of black canary), and treating women like human beings. We can.

TL;DR: This is some fantastic artwork and you should leave your moral outrage out of it, stop trying to be offended by things, and just enjoy beauty where it exists in the world.

"She can do it. But she has to show some skin to do it"

Risingblade:
Did pin up poster girls from the 40's really show off that much skin?

Exposed navels aside, most of these wouldn't be out of line for 40's era ad posters:

Compared to a lot of nose art seen on WWII aircraft, these are actually fairly tame.

Catwoman is my favorite. :)

NotThePANTSU:

Also distancing them from being mere gender-swapped counterparts kind of falls flat when you feel the need to tell everyone that Supergirl is: "related to the world's most super man". Is being super in her own right not enough?

Fair point. That seemed like the creator poking gentle fun at Supergirl's character concept ("It's Superman, only for girls!"), and mocking the condescending attitudes prevalent during that time period.

It's sort of like in Bioshock Infinite, where they had the newsreel showing Dr. Lutece making a point about quantum mechanics, and the title card says, "We say it's more like 'women's intuition'"! The modern viewer is supposed to go, "Really?"

ritchards:
Yep, there's nothing as respectful to superheroines than depicting them as 1940s pin up glamour girls...

They aren't bad looking. And I've seen official and fan art that is way more explicit. But this was released not too long ago.
http://geekvault.co.uk/682-thickbox_default/wonder-woman-premium-format-statue-by-sideshow.jpg

And it would be nice to see more series of the ladies with "I'm not here to take shit" poses/faces. The dolled up ones are a lot more common. And since some of the featured pictures have been made into statuettes...http://www.mostwantedcollectibles.com/images/dc/DCC_BombshellsWonderWomanStatue.jpg

I'm trying to think of the last time someone gave this treatment to the male characters. Just something light the focused on how attractive they are supposed to be (not that you can tell with some characters. Batman always has a grump face) I'm more than sure that their is fan art that fits the bill. I'm not sure if they would get the stamp of approval and be made into statues.

Black Canary's outfit is ALREADY from the era or timeless enough to fit and the Gingham is excessive in that instance.

Oddly enough I found Batgirl's too modern. Midrift baring? Just ... not accepting. The rest are more racy or exposing or not but that struck me as incongruous. That and Canary.

NotThePANTSU:
For me Black Canary, HawkGirl, Poison Ivy, and Wonder Woman are the best of the bunch but doesn't "She can do it!" seem rather patronising?

the heart of wonder woman's issues as a character. She's here to prove the power of women or be an example of a woman being a superhero not JUST a heroine doing super things.

ritchards:
Yep, there's nothing as respectful to superheroines than depicting them as 1940s pin up glamour girls...

Totally agree. The only one I found any way appealing was Black Canary. Really feels like wack off material. Showing way too much skin and they have the anatomy of any terrible cheesecake picture.

It's a shame because it really could have been interesting seeing Selina Kyle as Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep. Nope she's a porn secretary in cosplay. If they did a straight up Rosie the Riveter for Wonder Woman I would have dug it. (The Bracelets would have made it perfect.)

Oh yeah when I think of Poison Ivy I think lingerie. Would have been so much better if it was a perfume with a "drive men wild" caption. Harley Quinn as a cabaret dancer. Super Girl playing baseball and hitting a home run. Bat Girl As a ww2 era cab lady hunting for crime. It was a time where many woman took on jobs that men traditionally did. SO many wasted opportunities.

They do this so well for the male characters. such a shame, could have made some great character portraits.

Black Canary looked like the closest one to doing their research. For the others...while the poses are of the time the outfits are eh. Especially Batwoman. The corset is just not doing it for the symmetry at all.

I like the pin-up aesthetic and all, but... why Rosie the Riveter? Why?

She wasn't a pin-up, she was a wartime symbol encouraging women to take on traditionally male work in munitions factories and such. She's a freakin' feminist symbol, for crying out loud.

THIS is how you pay homage to that poster using a superhero:

So yeah, decent art and quite a fun idea, but the Rosie image doesn't sit well with me.

Nothing short of beautiful.

I'm a real sucker for pin-up/Americana stuff like this. The Rosie image doesn't quite fit with me, either.

This is so bizzarre, and kinda of cool, but....

Eamar:
I like the pin-up aesthetic and all, but... why Rosie the Riveter? Why?

Because the one thing that would improve Rosie is T&A. Because fapbait.

 

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