OnLive Cuts CloudLift Subscription Price In Half

OnLive Cuts CloudLift Subscription Price In Half

CloudLift logo

OnLive has apparently decided that paying $15 a month to play games you already own is maybe a bit much.

When OnLive came back to life last month, one of the big new features it boasted was CloudLift, a streaming service that allows subscribers to play PC games on virtually any device you care to name, including phones and tablets. That's not too terribly different from the original idea for OnLive, but the twist is that it works with digital distribution services like Steam and takes advantage of cloud saving so subscribers can pick up and play from just about anywhere. Got a game on Steam? You can play it on your tablet at no extra charge - well, except for the $14.99 monthly subscription fee.

But 15 bucks a month just to play games you already own when you're away from home? Somebody somewhere seems to have decided that's a bit on the steepish side, as the price has very quietly been reduced to roughly half that amount: $7.95 per month, plus the cost of the games. That's a far more reasonable amount; $14.99 isn't likely to break anyone (and if it is, a streaming game service should probably occupy a lower spot on your list of priorities) but does strike me as quite a bit to pay just to play your PC games when you're not on your PC.

Whether or not it's "worth" the cost is a question I can't even begin to try to answer, since I don't have the bandwidth for that sort of streaming service and thus have never tried it. But assuming you do, is this lower price enough to make you think about signing up?

Source: OnLive

Webby Voting Banner

Permalink

I would consider it. I could definitely see myself thoroughly enjoying some Sonic Generations on my netbook.

P.S. Thanks

It'd be cool to be able to stream stuff, but I'm not sure cool enough even for eight bucks. Eight bucks is a couple more games a month, TBH.

So it's enough to make me consider it, but maybe not to make me shell out.

I'd really like to hear more about how this actually works. It sounds good on paper but how is it in real life?

Andy Chalk:
I'd really like to hear more about how this actually works. It sounds good on paper but how is it in real life?

I can't speak to this particular service, but I did try some Gaikai EA demos a few years back (it was my entire PC gaming regimen for a few weeks when my GPU broke). Honestly, it really depends on the game. The input lag is enough to ruin racing games, twitch shooters, or anything else that relies on really low input latency, but some less reflex-based games work nicely enough. Probably enough for most third-person shooters, stealth games, and way more than enough for Civ V.

P.S. Thanks

Onlive is a very good idea on paper. In practice its biggest flaw is that publishers are being dicks and do not agree with their games being on the service (sigh, another Netflix not having acess to movies all over again) and the services suffer for it, because basically i find nothing i want to play on there. In practice its good for people that want to play those games but rather not want to buy the hardware needed. If good games were on it it may even end up cheaper in the long run provided you pay for games at non-steam prices.

Andy Chalk:
I'd really like to hear more about how this actually works. It sounds good on paper but how is it in real life?

In practice it works like MMOs controlling the game engine on server side, except for everything. your connection quality (not speed) is the most important factor to determine how much lag your going to get. and you are going to get some. and while in some games its not a big problem (a half second reaction delay on games like civilization would hardly be a problem) in something that requires reaction its frustrating. and its so for same reason that cloud computing are not going to work either. internet cannot defy physics. light only moves so fast in the fiber optics.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here