Game of Thrones The Lion and the Rose Breaks Torrent Records

Game of Thrones The Lion and the Rose Breaks Torrent Records

More than 193,000 people were tracked sharing the same torrent for the latest Game of Thrones shocker.

Game of Thrones recently stunned fans with yet another a big twist in its most recent episode The Lion and the Rose. The show's many fans, in turn, expressed their appreciation by illegally downloading the episode 1.5 million times in the 24 hours following.

That being the case, the truly impressive numbers came from trackers who revealed that a whopping 193,418 people were, at one point, sharing a single torrent. This rare instance of mass sharing blew previous records (also held by Game of Thrones) out the water by more than 20,000 people.

Not that the show is a stranger to such high numbers. Just a week ago, the season four premiere was downloaded more than a million times in the first 12 hours following its airing. At the peak of that piracy fest more than 300,000 people were sharing one of three popular torrents. The season three finale, likewise, dominated TV show torrents back in 2013 when it was downloaded 5.9 million times.

The real question now, of course, is just how long this record will stand. With the show's popularity ever rising and season four already looking as though it will be especially eventful, it might be safe to assume that the series will be knocking its own records over more than once in the coming months.

Source: TorrentFreak

Permalink

You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

You'd also imagine they'd be in more of a rush to actually get money from people by releasing the blu-ray in a timely manner rather than waiting a year, until just before the next season comes out...

Saulkar:
You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

Suprise! A great show with low availability being pirated. :)

HBO could as well take a hint and start providing VODs worldwide, but apparently they don't want the money.

ricree:

Saulkar:
You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

I haven't really followed the show, just watching it when my friends by a season, but where exactly can you find episodes before it hits DVD?

If you could buy access to single episodes or the series on a streaming service without ads and without having to own cable AND HBO, that'd be fine. As it is, it is a huge pain in the ass to watch GoT on HBO. Since a lot of people don't bother owning cable anymore.
I should also add that it has to be available the same time it airs. GoT fans foam at the mouth and aren't going to wait even an extra few hours.

Clive Howlitzer:
I should also add that it has to be available the same time it airs. GoT fans foam at the mouth and aren't going to wait even an extra few hours.

There's a reason for that, it's because of spoilers.
Because the internet is full of assholes who take great joy in spoiling things for other people, even things that have just recently aired.

It's fascinating how backwards HBO's thinking is. Their CEO once said that he thought online video was just a fad, so they refuse to have a decent VoD service. I'd get HBO GO if I didn't also have to pay for a cable service AND a cable HBO subscription. Aforementioned backwards thinking combined with the nature of the show's plot and intrigue make it a perfect storm for pirates. There's alot of pressure to be up to date on it because that's what everyone is going to be talking about. Especially since a certain website I frequent has picked up on a comedic recap of the latest episode that 'airs' every Wednesday >.>

JaceArveduin:

ricree:

Saulkar:
You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

I haven't really followed the show, just watching it when my friends by a season, but where exactly can you find episodes before it hits DVD?

HBOGO.
EDIT: That is, assuming you're fine with paying for the service and its prerequisites.

OT:
And no one was surprised, yet again! I'm lucky in that a friend of mine has the service, although I'm still grumbly when using it because I also have another friend's Netflix.

...

Damn it...

ricree:

Saulkar:
You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

There are no paying HBO-Customers outside the united states.
They could just block IPs from the states and run with the ad money or charge people from the rest of the world 50 cents for each episode.

As of right now this is a testament to the fact that the people in HBO's boardroom have not yet adjusted to the times and would rather go millions of potential profits go down the drain rather than expanding their stone-age-business model. I would like to pay for watching Game of Thrones to support the series. But since I live in Europe, I can't pay for it, because there is no HBO here.

Cable-TV and Pay-Tv in it's current form are endangered species in the information age and right now companies just don't face that truth. And it is costing them big bucks.

Ferisar:

JaceArveduin:

ricree:

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

I haven't really followed the show, just watching it when my friends by a season, but where exactly can you find episodes before it hits DVD?

HBOGO.
EDIT: That is, assuming you're fine with paying for the service and its prerequisites.

OT:
And no one was surprised, yet again! I'm lucky in that a friend of mine has the service, although I'm still grumbly when using it because I also have another friend's Netflix.

...

Damn it...

Soo.... Basically, you have to have the subscription for the actual channel? If so, I can see why it's pirated so much.

Didn't the shows producer say he wasn't bothered by the mass amounts of piracy in last seasons premiere?

Anyway this piracy just goes to show that the old Cable subscription market is completely outdated. They can have a VOD service that charges a small fee for watching it commercial free and in HD, Then after 24-48 hours release it with commercial's in a slightly lower resolution like Hulu uses and free to watch. And they can have a subscription to watch HBO over the internet just like if the viewers had cable/satellite. They would have all bases covered really. those who just want to watch the one show and are willing to pay a premium price, those that would have pirated it, and those that would like to have HBO but not pay for cable/satellite to get it.

They don't care. They see it as a victory that their show gets pirated so much. Plus their DVD boxes of GoT are flying of the racks as soon as they come out. It is kind of stupid that they don't offer online services but... yeah. They make enough money I suppose.

This article feels almost as if its supporting piracy.

I am sure The Escapist wouldn't support it (due to their stance on AdBlock afterall), but I do get that impression from this.

And just think if they charged say 2 per episode maybe not in HD but still good thats ALOT of money they missed out on.

I don't understand, HBO must not like money because they still haven't created a streaming/vod service outside of the States.

It does seem like they are missing out on so much money by not providing a global service with a small fee to view new episodes. There must be a business reason behind it, either that, or HBO have the Squeenix mentality of doing what their fans don't want because they hate profit.

Maybe it'll change in future if they can acquire the rights to stream in all countries, but until then I'll continue to watch Game of Thrones in my own way. (That I won't go into here due to the Escapist's policy on these things.)

To those interested in watching the series and live outside the U.S.A.: HBO is licensing public production of Game of Thrones to TV stations from around the world. It is the responsibility of the local channel to reach to HBO and ask to be allowed to play the series.

For example where I live,there is a pay-to-watch channel that plays each new episode a day after it airs on the USA,(this day is needed for subtitles to be added) and there is another, free-to-watch channel that plays old episodes over and over again until the exclusive license for national play terms have ended for the pay-to-watch channel.
So we have 2 channels playing it in Greece. :D Those who pay watch it first,and those who can't afford to pay the fees of pay-to-watch channels can watch it too,albeit somewhat later.

Bad thing is that because the new episodes air on the USA a day before they play here,local sites that are covering the news happen to also comment on the episodes after the moment they have played in America,so the internet in Mondays is full of spoilers!

I'm from Melbourne, Australia. I think you can guess how I feel about the piracy of this series.

Exterminas:
There are no paying HBO-Customers outside the united states.
They could just block IPs from the states and run with the ad money or charge people from the rest of the world 50 cents for each episode.

The US getting the short end of a stick? That'll be the day.

Not surprised, in the UK you only two choices to watch it legitimately (as broadcast, there are also BD/DVDs after a delay). You have to either a Sky subscription with Sky Atlantic in the package or you have to have internet and get a Now TV set top box and a pay monthly pack that includes Sky Atlantic via that service, Sky do not even lease the channel to the Virgin Media cable service like they do with just about everything else like the movies and sports.

HBO are stupid, if they uploaded the new episodes onto iTunes or the Play Store the same day they first aired they could turn some of those millions of downloads into hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Its the old fashioned mentality of these old guard media, the "we must has curation of all the contents" attitude they have. The worlds moving on, people like to download and watch these things OD now. If they make it convenient and for a good price people will buy it, there will still be some piracy but they will still make loads of cash.

BanicRhys:
I'm from Melbourne, Australia. I think you can guess how I feel about the piracy of this series.

Exterminas:
There are no paying HBO-Customers outside the united states.
They could just block IPs from the states and run with the ad money or charge people from the rest of the world 50 cents for each episode.

The US getting the short end of a stick? That'll be the day.

How is that the short end of any stick? They are just offering their products on foreign markets, based on the terms of those markets. US-Companies have been doing this for years now. Take the various TV-Features of the Xbone that don't work in many European countries, for example.

Or consider the Warner Brothers online-portal, where you can watch many classic WB-Cartoons for free, if you are from America. And where you don't can watch anything if you are not from America. This kind of country-based different treatment is common practice.

Granted, most of the time that works out to the disadvantage of international customers, but creating one of a few cases where that is not the case should not qualify as "Americans getting the short stick". Cable-TV just works different in America than it does compared to the rest of the world.

Not surprising at all. People will get shows by the easiest method. The internet changed all of that. The old ways are no longer the best, but the cable/distro companies can't see that because they are run by old men who have no idea what they are doing anymore.

If they just got with the times and made these shows available via more channels of distribution, especially On Demand, then they'd make so much money and win over so many "pirates". Right now, they are trying to have their cake, and eat it. It's not going to happen.

JaceArveduin:

ricree:

Saulkar:
You know, one would think HBO would take the hint and release the episode for free on their website and collect the ad revenue.

I imagine their paying customers might have something to say about that.

I haven't really followed the show, just watching it when my friends by a season, but where exactly can you find episodes before it hits DVD?

Chyeh, instead of making the most of it, they outsource their rights exclusively to asshole cable monopolies. I love HBO and the shows they produce but in terms of business acumen, they're shithouse.

Sometimes I make posts that aren't sensible. At those times, I delete said posts. And then go to sleep.

And then make them seem relevant.

JaceArveduin:

Soo.... Basically, you have to have the subscription for the actual channel? If so, I can see why it's pirated so much.

Yep. Get rekt, filthy casul and get gud at TV.

Or something. I don't know. It's all stupid.

Griffolion:
Not surprising at all. People will get shows by the easiest method. The internet changed all of that. The old ways are no longer the best, but the cable/distro companies can't see that because they are run by old men who have no idea what they are doing anymore.

If they just got with the times and made these shows available via more channels of distribution, especially On Demand, then they'd make so much money and win over so many "pirates". Right now, they are trying to have their cake, and eat it. It's not going to happen.

This is an incorrect assumption. Cable companies and telecom companies in general are not run by old men that have no idea what they are doing.

What is holding back the industry in general, in this area, is the billions of dollars in invested infrastructure these systems have. And the millions of dollars in contracts and agreements made between networks, content providers and distribution networks and hardware providers world wide.

You can't just expect people to trash a billion dollars worth of infrastructure utilizing satellites, uplink and downlink facilities, continental sized fiber networks and of course more ironclad contracts than they can shake a stick at to just up and say "Oh well yanno this'll make more money if we just put it on Youtube for the masses" cause even if they would make more money they'd get sued into literal fire sale bankruptcy and then probably indicted by the FCC and other communications standards bureau's around the world.

I really get annoyed with the whole "Its all them old men that don't know how to make money any more" argument. And its always Gen X/Millennial types, from my own generation, making this blind accusation.

When you have 10 billion dollars tied up in contracts and hardware, I don't think you'd be very quick to make sudden, sweeping and potentially ruinous changes to your operation either.

Everyone, right up to the "old men" in the cable industry, know exactly how much the media consumption landscape has changed....its all in how to shift to the new landscape when your investments and legal agreements have you married to the old one.

1.5 million downloads? Jesus, did everyone want to see Joffrey die THAT BADLY?!

Most pirated show in history is also one of the most popular, successful, and creative, but piracy is somehow destroying the industry. Derp.

Pr0:

Everyone, right up to the "old men" in the cable industry, know exactly how much the media consumption landscape has changed....its all in how to shift to the new landscape when your investments and legal agreements have you married to the old one.

They don't have to touch any of their old distribution methods to get with the times. Setting up a streaming service via a website is incredibly simple and takes any college compsci student maybe an afternoon to write code for. The problem isn't their slow progress adopting a new distribution medium in an era where the playing field has changed, it's that they haven't done _anything_ on that front. A non-region-locked website where consumers could pay for a full season up front, get each episode streamed the day (or day after) it airs on cable TV (who has those anymore?), and download links for each episode once the season completes. It's that simple. They don't have to update shit for it, they don't have to violate any old contracts or abandon old infrastructure.

HBO has a literal army of millions of pirates, most of whom are only pirating because there's no other way to get the product in any kind of a sane, timely fashion. 10-month delayed DVD releases, sometimes not even available in your country? A streaming service only available in ONE country? What a joke! Compared to the relative ease of setting up a simple streaming service, the millions of dollars in lost revenue is mindboggling.

This is why the old fogey label is thrown around; they're bafflingly daft to not take advantage of any of the methods that are _commonly used_ today to distribute media. Yes, they have millions/billions of dollars in old contracts and old hardware, but if those are dying out in favor of new tech, you don't stick to them like a captain on a sinking ship. You honor deals you had, try to salvage any of that infrastructure you can, and catch up to an age where paying for shit online isn't a huge mystery. You don't trudge blindly forward insisting your hilariously outdated methods of content distribution still hold water.

In HBO's case, they make some incredibly high quality shows. The Wire, Boardwalk Empire, and now Game of Thrones... their skill is unmatched, really. But they're still stuck in the old world mindset where your cable network is "the only way" to distribute media.

There is no real way to defend them in this situation. They should have much better distribution methods and don't, hurting both HBO (costing them millions of dollars in lost revenue) and their fans (no legitimate way for most of them to watch, forcing them to either miss the show or resort to piracy). They don't have to completely trash their old distribution networks to adopt new ones, but their total lack of progress on that front is why the old men comments get bandied about. The "stuck in the old days" mindset is detrimental, and whether it's actually old men being old men or younger men who are just incompetent, it's not an excuse. They need to get their shit together. It's 2014; consumers shouldn't have to pirate a show to even be able to see it without waiting 10+ months for an arbitrarily-delayed DVD release, almost a full year of spoilers after the episodes actually aired.

Game of Thrones is such a high quality show, I'd wager the majority of those currently pirating wouldn't balk at coughing up enough money for a season pass to a high quality streaming service. That's really all it would take. A small portion of the pirates do so because of monetary concerns, and those will pretty much always pirate, but the huge chunk that simply love great TV and want to experience it in a remotely timely fashion would definitely be on board with a stream/vod service. All HBO has to do is "get with the times." No amount of old contracts or infrastructure is worth losing custom from millions of potential consumers, especially not when the fix for it is so blisteringly easy.

AuronFtw:

Pr0:

Everyone, right up to the "old men" in the cable industry, know exactly how much the media consumption landscape has changed....its all in how to shift to the new landscape when your investments and legal agreements have you married to the old one.

They don't have to touch any of their old distribution methods to get with the times. Setting up a streaming service via a website is incredibly simple and takes any college compsci student maybe an afternoon to write code for. The problem isn't their slow progress adopting a new distribution medium in an era where the playing field has changed, it's that they haven't done _anything_ on that front. A non-region-locked website where consumers could pay for a full season up front, get each episode streamed the day (or day after) it airs on cable TV (who has those anymore?), and download links for each episode once the season completes. It's that simple. They don't have to update shit for it, they don't have to violate any old contracts or abandon old infrastructure....

Example of a situation that is similar to what you're describing.

The WWE Network.

Example of why it doesn't work.

The WWE Network is contractually bound by agreements with various national and world wide networks which precludes them from being able to live broadcast their primary live weekly TV shows for 30 days after their original airing.

This is due to contractual and syndication agreements made with their various network carriers. The WWE has already made that step into content on demand and its been rather successful and all the content they can actually provide for the Network is right there...but the large draw content, which is their weekly shows, are still tied up in contractual agreements with the network carriers that distribute them in their original live formats.

This same problem would apply to HBO in regards to premium content being provided to them or through them, to any national network carrier. HBO Go is about as far as they can go in this realm due to contractual agreements. They might eventually be able to set up things like GoT and their other popular shows via on demand streaming, but its cannot evolve into day of broadcast on demand delivery simply due to the exclusivity rights in regards to agreements and contracts signed with network carriers.

Now in five to ten years all of this may change, but that is largely due to the way contractual agreements will evolve around new media trends in that time and how new media contracts will evolve after the old ones expire or renegotiate. You can't change contracts on a whim...that's why people sign them, or insist on them in the first place.

Well.... He certainly settled down...

...huehue

Doesn't surprise me though, It's been a scene everyone's been dying to see since season 1, and being the most torrented TV series...

It always amazes me that a company that is so in touch with what we want to watch, is so out of touch with how to get it to us. Probably the most progressive/conservative content provider ever.

At the end of the day it all comes down to the dollars. I'll use the current situation in Australia as an example:

In Australia last season there were two ways to get the episodes legally; via iTunes or foxtel. iTunes was available approximately 1 day after US broadcast for (what I consider) a reasonable price of approximately $3 for SD (480p) or $5 for HD. the other option was by subscribing the foxtel (our cable monopoly) for both the basic package and an extra package including the channel GoT airs on (~$50/month).

This season it is not available on iTunes. Foxtel paid a sufficient amount of money in the contract renegotiations that it is not available from any source other than them until DVD release time months down the track. Clearly the cable company is making enough on its bundled content surcharge to make up for the viewers who would previously have only bought GoT through iTunes.

I've seen a number of discussions around why torrenting is so prevalent in Australia (in general not just with reference to GoT) and I keep coming back to two points; inertia and ease of access. The media companies haven't gotten a reasonably priced alternate option quick enough, they have allowed us time to get used to torrenting. The second is ease of access, if an alternate system is to gain a foothold is Australia it doesn't just have to be easier than the current legal options it has be easier to use than torrenting.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here