Navy NeRD eReader Lacks Ports and WiFi, but Comes Chock Full of Books

Navy NeRD eReader Lacks Ports and WiFi, but Comes Chock Full of Books

Findaway NeRD eReader 310x

The NeRD eReader is secure, but it's got plenty of reading material baked in.

There are plenty of eReaders out there, but none of them are secure enough to be used on US Navy vessels. That's not a marketing tagline, either, as the Navy doesn't allow consumer devices with cellular radios or WiFi connections on submarines (so no iPad or Kindles allowed).

No Kindles means reading is a bit of a pain, not because seamen have to read physical books, but due to the limited supply of reading material on your average submarine.

So the Navy has partnered with Findaway World to create the NeRD, or Navy eReader Device. The NeRD has no connectivity ports or wireless connections, so there's no chance of the device being used to betray a submarine's location.

Each NeRD comes pre-loaded with 300 titles, ranging from Navy-specific material, to science fiction, to classics and modern titles. These titles will never change, until the existing NeRD is replaced with a new model.

Each Navy sub will be receiving five NeRD devices for use by the crew, with more to follow as production ramps up.

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How could a USB port be used to betray the location of a submarine? Not putting a wi-fi adapter makes perfect sense, but I don't see why they didn't just let it be loaded with whatever books they wanted via USB port.

Retsam19:
How could a USB port be used to betray the location of a submarine? Not putting a wi-fi adapter makes perfect sense, but I don't see why they didn't just let it be loaded with whatever books they wanted via USB port.

Or an SDCard.

Or can SDCards be used to betray....anything?

Retsam19:
How could a USB port be used to betray the location of a submarine?

Well, I suppose you could use it to store information on from the ship's computers on position, depth, engine settings and such, over time yo could use that data to build a picture of where the sub is routed on it's patrols and where it is likely to be routed in future.

Alternatively it could be secretly housing a copy of Arnim Zola in every sub and a viable connection could allow him to escape into the wider internet.

Retsam19:
How could a USB port be used to betray the location of a submarine? Not putting a wi-fi adapter makes perfect sense, but I don't see why they didn't just let it be loaded with whatever books they wanted via USB port.

It's the Wi-Fi capabilities of the Kindle that the Navy doesn't like, not the USB.

You gotta love that name! Hopefully this helps people in the Navy out with their reading.

How can something called the "NAVY NeRD" not include any ports?

Devin Connors:
There are plenty of eReaders out there, but none of them are secure enough to be used on US Navy vessels. That's not a marketing tagline, either, as the Navy doesn't allow consumer devices with cellular radios or WiFi connections on submarines (so no iPad or Kindles allowed).

I'm not sure that's entirely accurate. I'm assigned to a carrier myself and work in the propulsion space. They are anal about what you can take into the plant or assigned classified spaces, but outside of that you can pretty much have anything. I would read my 3G Kindle in the hour long galley line on deployment. I would watch videos or play games on my laptop in my rack. Or maybe I'd head to the lounge and play some 360 with someone. My phone was my alarm clock, as was the case for the majority of the people in my berthing.

But that is the surface fleet. While in the training pipeline I had instructors who were submariners and in their off time they talked about playing video games on consoles and laptops. In the plant this reader wouldn't be allowed anyways since it's not propulsion plant material. I think the real reason behind the lack of wifi and a USB port is to save cost and keep sailors from fucking them up. Underway you really don't have any use for wifi other than maybe an adhoc connection. You sure as hell aren't getting internet. A USB port could end up with someone dicking around with something they aren't supposed to. Kind of a stretch, but that all I got. Honestly I'd have left a USB port even if it only had a charging functionality so it would compatible with chargers sailors already own.

When I read the headline I thought "great, we can cut our paper usage down," then I finished reading the article... seriously, we waist a lot of paper in the navy; and I haven't even been to boot yet.

All I can say is the navy loves their acronyms, almost everything gets one.

i dont see why they cant even give it an SD card port and then just ban SD card slots on the classified parts of the ships hardware SD cards for entertainment and the rest can be for classified stuff that way you can stack up a whole bunch of SD cards and then just slot them into the book reader as needed easy silly Navy would never have to put up with that in the Air Force

 

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