Man Behind Toyota Prius Battery now Making Cotton-Based Power Packs

Man Behind Toyota Prius Battery now Making Cotton-Based Power Packs

CEO Duo Kani and CTO Dr. Kaname Takeya want to change how we think about batteries.

Power Japan Plus knows the future cannot run on the lithium-ion batteries we all have in our smartphones and cars, and they're banking on cotton to be the next big breakthrough.

According to PJP, the Ryden dual carbon battery is a Carbon Complex piece of tech. PJP takes organic cotton, changes the structure of the carbon fibers in the plant, and uses this modified material for energy storage. The end result? A battery that can hold more energy, hold energy for longer, and can be charged significantly faster than lithium-ion packs -- in minutes instead of hours. The Cotton-based matter form the positive and negative electrodes, and the conductor is an organic electrolyte.

Dr. Kaname Takeya, the CTO of PJP (and one of the key figures behind the battery system in Toyota's Prius hybrid), says that current battery tech has "made great improvement on performance, but [has] done so by compromising on cost, reliability and safety."

The biggest implication for these new batteries (assuming they pan out) is for use in cars. Electric cars like the Tesla Model S, while fantastic pieces of technology, still rely on aging lithium-ion battery hardware. These new Dual Carbon packs could launch electric cars out of the niche category, and into the middle America mainstream.

The initial benchmark production run of over 18,000 Ryden batteries will start at the Power Japan Plus facility in Okinawa later this year.

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While I wouldn't call lithium ion batteries an aging technology, the dual carbon batteries seem to hold quite a bit of promise. Lithium is not exactly common but cotton is grown all over the world. Which means cheaper battery and cheaper electric cars.

Looks pretty neat. Clearly we need stable, long lasting batteries to power future technology.

The video though is pretty funny with all the B reel footage used in the background. :)

So, how prone to fires and what's amount of pollution comes from manufacturing these new batteries? Both answers are probably far better than a batteries based on highly reactive alkali metal ions.

Hairless Mammoth:
So, how prone to fires and what's amount of pollution comes from manufacturing these new batteries? Both answers are probably far better than a batteries based on highly reactive alkali metal ions.

In the video they claimed almost no heat increase. Cotton on the other hand is known as the pesticide industry. They are tough little plants to keep alive.

Their demo video shows they still use Lithium, but I guess it cuts down on the huge amount of Lithium oxide that traditional LiPo batteries use.

I wonder what the temperature performance is? Lithium batteries SUCK in cold weather. It would be nice if someone could develop a battery that works in a cold Canadian winter...

Hairless Mammoth:
So, how prone to fires and what's amount of pollution comes from manufacturing these new batteries? Both answers are probably far better than a batteries based on highly reactive alkali metal ions.

producing cotton based batteries? probably low pollution.

Growing the cotton on the other hand? pesticides, carbon exhaust from tractors plowing, planting, harvesting, compacting, and delivery.

Scores of other pollutants and environmental concerns too since every two or so years you have to rotate crops so you dont burn out the soil, which most people trying to push a bigger profit will do every five or so years.

The main difference that will come from this is the fact that Cotton can be replenished, but organic cotton is extremely hard to keep alive without constant care.

not to mention thanks to the BMO groups, you cant replant seeds from harvests, you have to buy an entirely new batch each year, and prices will skyrocket when/if these batteries hit mass production.

It's all well and good to report all this but there've been a number of stories about various companies/universities who've made "breakthroughs" in this field. However, despite all the reports about batteries that charge faster, last longer, hold more power, have a smaller environmental impact and do all the clever new things current-gen batteries can't, we have yet to see a single one.

Right now, the only technology available is Li-Ion or Li-Poly. Until a new tech battery is actually available for the consumer to buy and use, I'm not going to think twice about these reports. I wish them luck, I really do since current battery technology is horrendously behind the times considering how many advances there've been in every single other technological field. Li-Ion simply can't keep up with new phones, computers or electric cars. I'll welcome it gladly with open arms and be amongst the first in line to buy, but won't believe it until I see it.

 

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