Mars One Narrows Applicant Pool to 758 Potential Colonists

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Mars One Narrows Applicant Pool to 758 Potential Colonists

Mars One Habitat

Mars One has narrowed its pool of potential martian colonists from over 200,000 applicants to 758, which include married men and women who may never see their spouses again.

By 2025, humanity will have established a permanent colony on Mars. At least, that's the objective of Mars One, a nonprofit organization that wants to send four people to Mars in 2024 and subsequent groups thereafter.

But who would be willing to undertake such a dangerous mission - one that would likely mean never again returning to Earth? Over 200,000 people, apparently, because that was the number of applications Mars One received. The team initially narrowed down the number of potential applicants to 1,058 individuals and have now further narrowed that number down to 705 candidates, who are said to have dropped out for personal or medical reasons. The remaining candidates will be interviewed by a selection committee.

One such candidate is Dr. Leila Zucker, who has been married for 21 years. Her husband doesn't want her to go, she said, but he supports her following her dreams. "Both of us are space enthusiasts," she said. "Humanity needs to expand off Earth if we expect the human race to succeed in any way beyond just basic survival." Zucker also said that if she is selected to go to Mars, she will likely offer her husband a divorce, but will continue wearing her wedding ring regardarless.

Candidate Dan Carey has a wife and two college-age children. "She's concerned that she's going to have to watch me die on television," he said of his wife, who is not pleased about her husband's decision.

Sachin Desai and his wife Ankita Ritwik applied together. While he is aware that the trip might challenge their marriage, he said that enough marriages are strained on Earth, and he could not go to Mars without his wife.

Source: CNN

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Is this the beginning of starwars? A few thousand years from now earth will be fighting mars for resources, just imagine how cool that would be! somebody might drop an asteroid.

ExtraDebit:
Is this the beginning of starwars? A few thousand years from now earth will be fighting mars for resources, just imagine how cool that would be! somebody might drop an asteroid.

do you mean the red faction games ?

I'll get there by other means. Got to finish med school first.

I wouldn't worry to much about spouse fidelity. Mars One is probably not going to happen in our lifetime.

I'm pretty sure this mission will fail. Even if they get to mars what are they going to there for the rest of their lives except counting rocks. Someone will start a minecraft live action role playing group and will dig up the games to hell.

Ichigo:
I'm pretty sure this mission will fail. Even if they get to mars what are they going to there for the rest of their lives except counting rocks. Someone will start a minecraft live action role playing group and will dig up the games to hell.

Somehow I agree, I mean it's not like we got terraforming technologies yet. They could lock themselves up in a tent in some desert and it would be pretty much the samething. I think this is just an excuse for husbands and wives to leave their spouse.

I think one of the biggest barriers to visiting mars is the long exposure to deadly radiation on the trip. We don't have an answer for it yet, and it seems to pierce every kind of protective material we've made so far. Before we can pretend to set up a mars colony, we have to get there alive.

I fully expect the first few waves of colonists to die, either from technical accidents or injuries on the planet. In a new environment, it's possible to contract any kind of disease or malady, for which we'd have no cure. And that's not even mentioning the high cost of sending enough food, water and other supplies over... from now until forever. Unless they set up a farm or something (which also takes a lot of water...) they'd be completely reliant on shipments. Any delay in those could spell doom for anyone living on the planet.

It'd be "cool" to go to Mars, but only if I was old and had nothing to live for on earth. If someone else wants to be a lab rat to find what kind of shit can kill you on Mars, feel free to join the queue!

It's nice to see Mars One has narrowed down its applicant field, but what are they doing about the monies?
It cost billions to get an unmanned buggy to land safe, and that's solar powered. To put 1 person, and his home and his food and his water and his oxygen (and the systems to make more) is going to cost.... well, a lot.
I can't wait till we colonise, and I really want Mars One to succeed. But I don't think they have the financial support....

I don't think any of these people are ever going to Mars, which is why I wonder what this whole process is about. A PR gag? As I see it, first man on Mars is at least 30 years away, by that time most of these applicants are going to be too old or will have to be re-evaluated.

There is no way in hell that this project will ever raise enough money to build a colony there. Space science is expensive, and this project relies on things that do not even exist yet.

I don't know if I should hope for prothean tech to be discovered or not. On one hand there are reapers, on the other hand I'd like me some asari.

After reading the comments here I've come to realized that there really is no point in colonizing mars, I mean....seriously think about it, what is the point?

If for science and exploration, they don't need to colonize it, they just need to go live a few years and collect samples. If they want some inhospitable place to live they can go "colonize" some desert or under the ocean, it's cheaper and you can come back if you so choose.

There really is no point colonizing mars.

ExtraDebit:
After reading the comments here I've come to realized that there really is no point in colonizing mars, I mean....seriously think about it, what is the point?

If for science and exploration, they don't need to colonize it, they just need to go live a few years and collect samples. If they want some inhospitable place to live they can go "colonize" some desert or under the ocean, it's cheaper and you can come back if you so choose.

There really is no point colonizing mars.

Colonization of the Oceans is actually rather brilliant, if done right. Hell, the ocean as a whole should be something we aim to explore more of in the coming years/decade or two rather than space travel. We've got issues here on earth that need fixing before we start looking at even LESS hospitable places to go live on. Our ocean hides many secrets that could enable us to have the mineral resources we need to actually DO some of these technologically advanced dreams we have thanks to Science Fiction (which is more and more dropping the "Fiction" in it's genre.)

RedBackDragon:

ExtraDebit:
Is this the beginning of starwars? A few thousand years from now earth will be fighting mars for resources, just imagine how cool that would be! somebody might drop an asteroid.

do you mean the red faction games ?

Actually, I was going to say both Total Recall and Babylon 5...

I'm guessing this means it's too late to sign up?

Humans can't even take care of earth. Let alone a dead planet. This is a wildly dangerous, crazy and bad idea. We don't have the technology, or even the know-how to pull this off safely yet. Those people are almost certainly going to die, wether from lack of oxygen, to lack of water, or lack of food. All it takes is one thing going wrong... and poof, over 700 people dead.

I highly doubt this will ever even happen. Someone will put a stop to it. We have a hard enough time sending a small group of people to the moon and back, as it is.

I realize a lot of people want 'progress' and that they think the future lies in space. Well, I don't agree. I think that until we fix our problems here, we can't just choose to jump ship and think they'll be fixed if we move from one giant rock to another.

In reality, things will never be fixed... we'll never go to the stars, and we'll kill ourselves off. This short period of relative peace and 'prosperity' has been short lived, in the grand scheme of history, and that's exactly how it will be. History repeats itself after all, humans never change and they never learn. Thanks to the power of technology, we have far too much power and far too little brains. It doesn't take much for all out war to break out. Only a handful of people can begin a chain reaction that kills millions.

No thank you. Maybe when travel is much faster and all the bumps have been worked out and there's an actual, comfortable colony life available on Mars, then I'd consider it--so in other words, probably not while I'm alive. As it stands, I would be terrified to be one of the first people there. No help, no backup, no starting point except what you bring with you. No way.

ExtraDebit:
After reading the comments here I've come to realized that there really is no point in colonizing mars, I mean....seriously think about it, what is the point?

Learning to colonize other planets, particularly ones which may not be ideal for supporting human life, is the only way our species will ever be able to avoid total extinction for as long as possible.

Not only is that one hell of a point, it's literally the most important endeavor human beings might ever undertake.

michael87cn:
I highly doubt this will ever even happen. Someone will put a stop to it. We have a hard enough time sending a small group of people to the moon and back, as it is.

Who's going to stop it? And what right do they have to do so?

Moreover, what makes you think sending people to the moon and back is hard? If we're being totally honest here, going to the moon and back is stupidly easy compared to things like building a space station in orbit.

While we're on the subject, you overestimate just how easy it is for total war to break out, particularly in the modern day. Modern technology makes it dramatically less likely that we will ever see wars as large as either World War again, or that we'll completely annihilate ourselves through armed combat. Saying things like history repeats itself is oversimplifying pretty much every aspect of modern civilization, and a bit of a trite and half assed explanation for why we should expect total war someday.

Ninmecu:
Colonization of the Oceans is actually rather brilliant, if done right. Hell, the ocean as a whole should be something we aim to explore more of in the coming years/decade or two rather than space travel. We've got issues here on earth that need fixing before we start looking at even LESS hospitable places to go live on.

Nothing like a false dichotomy to take a conversation in a silly direction. The idea that ocean and space exploration are mutually exclusive is silly at face value. And the idea that exploring the oceans is more important to human survival than the eventual colonization of other planets and expansion to other star systems is equally as silly. If we stay on Earth, we will go extinct. If we spread out, our species and our civilization will long outlive our planet. Not to say that learning how to build ocean habitats isn't a noble goal. It might even lead to methods allowing us to better colonize other planets. But ignoring space travel and colonization all together might as well be the definition of foolish.

I agree that getting to and living on Mars would be a total bone fest but Vivi22 nailed it, we have to figure out how to live on other planets before our lease on Earth expires and Mars is our first step.

Vivi22:

Ninmecu:
Colonization of the Oceans is actually rather brilliant, if done right. Hell, the ocean as a whole should be something we aim to explore more of in the coming years/decade or two rather than space travel. We've got issues here on earth that need fixing before we start looking at even LESS hospitable places to go live on.

Nothing like a false dichotomy to take a conversation in a silly direction. The idea that ocean and space exploration are mutually exclusive is silly at face value. And the idea that exploring the oceans is more important to human survival than the eventual colonization of other planets and expansion to other star systems is equally as silly. If we stay on Earth, we will go extinct. If we spread out, our species and our civilization will long outlive our planet. Not to say that learning how to build ocean habitats isn't a noble goal. It might even lead to methods allowing us to better colonize other planets. But ignoring space travel and colonization all together might as well be the definition of foolish.

The way things work in this world, we generally only look at one and precisely ONE plan of action. We very rarely work with the idea that there are multiple means of dealing with any given situation. You seem to be implying that I believe space travel is not something worthy of working on, I never said such a thing. I'm stating that currently we should look more to earth, we've done more with regards to interplanetary exploration than we have in preparation of our own planet for the long haul, the way things are going we won't even survive here long enough for long distance interplanetary travel to be an option-never mind a reality.

TL;DR space travel would be cool, we ain't there yet, figuring out some more shit on home bast would be a wiser course of action imo.

While I agree that eventually colonizing other planets is a good idea, there's no harm in researching technology that would help with the colonisation. Can we create a capsule that is essecially it's own circle of life? Can we get lightweight radiation shielding, or a way to use the local materials to build such a shield?

While we're figuring out these questions, there's a chance that a space elevator will become a reality. Once you have a cheap way of transporting goods into orbit, It will be much cheaper to send something extremely heavy like a space colony to mars. So, my advice to Mars One: Do some more research into the essential technology when going there, while waiting for cheaper transportation methods.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_elevator

I read the wiki on space elevators. Fascinating stuff.

Vivi22:

michael87cn:
I highly doubt this will ever even happen. Someone will put a stop to it.

Who's going to stop it?

At this point, nobody needs to stop it, since it has approximately 0% of the resources it needs to succeed.

AuronFtw:
I think one of the biggest barriers to visiting mars is the long exposure to deadly radiation on the trip. We don't have an answer for it yet, and it seems to pierce every kind of protective material we've made so far. Before we can pretend to set up a mars colony, we have to get there alive.

Space radiation isn't that deadly. The dosage they'd get would be in the "significantly more likely to eventually die of cancer" range, not the "keel over from radiation poisoning" range.

AuronFtw:
Unless they set up a farm or something (which also takes a lot of water...) they'd be completely reliant on shipments.

They plan to do that. They don't have to bring all the water with them; there's water ice on mars.

fat tony:
It's nice to see Mars One has narrowed down its applicant field, but what are they doing about the monies?

The plan is that once they get into the training stages, they're going to film it. Then they'll sell broadcast rights to that film. It is yet to been seen whether broadcasters will be willing to spend as much as Mars One hopes.

ExtraDebit:
If for science and exploration, they don't need to colonize it, they just need to go live a few years and collect samples.

Coming back makes that way, way more expensive. Consider just the fuel costs; to get them there and back takes the fuel to get them there, plus the fuel to get them back, plus the fuel to get the fuel to get them back there. It gets prohibitive pretty quickly.

Rex Dark:
I'm guessing this means it's too late to sign up?

For this batch, yes. They plan to send a group every two years starting in 2024, so there should be an opportunity to sign up to be on a future trip.

michael87cn:
All it takes is one thing going wrong... and poof, over 700 people dead.

You realize they're not loading these 758 people into a rocket and firing it towards Mars tomorrow, right? They're gonna pick a few, train them for a decade, then send a batch of four every two years. 700 dead is extremely unlikely, even in the most bizarre of catastrophes.

Ninmecu:
The way things work in this world, we generally only look at one and precisely ONE plan of action. We very rarely work with the idea that there are multiple means of dealing with any given situation.

Who's we? Humanity tends to break down into groups of various sizes, who each do their own thing. Mars One working on colonizing Mars isn't going to interfere with Earthwatch's activities in any way.

I wish I had any skill that would let me in on the action. I just want to get off of this planet.

I hope they succeed. Pulling something like this off, making humanity an interplanetary species, could unite the rest of us left on Earth seeing what we could accomplish together if we put aside our petty differences.

Good luck to Mars One i say.

To the commenters here i say read the literature on the program, educate yourself (a few have, but not many) and then come back and comment with an informed opinion.

I've spent too long correcting misconceptions of this program in other threads to do the same here though, but i'll put some points:

ALL tech needed for this mission exists already, any refinements to the tech over the next 10 years is just a bonus.

The solar radiation is already accounted for, while in transit and once landed on mars.

They are planning on setting up self sustaining farms within their living capsules, so the majority of food needed will be grown on site.

New colonists every two years which will also take necessary supplies with them.

Only 4 people go initially, not 700 odd.

michael87cn:

I realize a lot of people want 'progress' and that they think the future lies in space. Well, I don't agree. I think that until we fix our problems here, we can't just choose to jump ship and think they'll be fixed if we move from one giant rock to another.

In reality, things will never be fixed... we'll never go to the stars, and we'll kill ourselves off.

This is a terrible view to take. The whole reason we need space is to fix many things wrong on Earth. Humanity needs a dream. Space exploration should be that dream.

theNater:

AuronFtw:
I think one of the biggest barriers to visiting mars is the long exposure to deadly radiation on the trip. We don't have an answer for it yet, and it seems to pierce every kind of protective material we've made so far. Before we can pretend to set up a mars colony, we have to get there alive.

Space radiation isn't that deadly. The dosage they'd get would be in the "significantly more likely to eventually die of cancer" range, not the "keel over from radiation poisoning" range.

You know it's the reason we haven't sent any astronauts over yet, right? It's pretty much guaranteed to get cancer, and a high chance to be outright lethal.

"We're talking about a lot of ionizing radiation, almost a guarantee for cancer, and you are really close to the edge of the range for lethal exposure," said Kristin Shrader-Frechette, a University of Notre Dame professor and a specialist in ethical issues that arise in scientific research and technology development. "If we can't get shorter transit times in space, and we can't get better shielding, then we really can't do (a Mars) spaceflight." (source)

The only amusing part of that article is the end, where NASA Chief Astronaut Robert Behnken says he can't imagine a line of people signing up for a one-way trip to Mars. In essence, that's what this Mars One thing is all about. If NASA was willing to use cannon fodder test subjects, we'd start making some progress.

AuronFtw:
You know it's the reason we haven't sent any astronauts over yet, right? It's pretty much guaranteed to get cancer, and a high chance to be outright lethal.

That's the round trip. They wouldn't be brushing up against lethal upon reaching Mars, but after they'd been to Mars and were arriving back at Earth.

RedBackDragon:

ExtraDebit:
Is this the beginning of starwars? A few thousand years from now earth will be fighting mars for resources, just imagine how cool that would be! somebody might drop an asteroid.

do you mean the red faction games ?

No, no. You mean The Waters of Mars!

I'd have loved to be a part of this. They need someone who knows more than just science and doctoring skills. They need down to >.> 'Earth' good old skills. Just think of how the plants would THRIVE there! They'd need someone who knows how to grow, and can actually put those skills to use.

I was so annoyed by the initial comments in this thread I made an account just so I could argue against them. I'm not sure how the formatting on this place works yet; this will be unacceptably devoid of formatting and bolded words. Soon I will learn how to quote multiple posts, but today is not that day...

1. "This is probably going to fail, so we shouldn't bother."
Since when is the prospect of failure supposed to deter projects like this? The entire space industry is full of risks and failure, but so is every other worthwhile endeavour. If parts of this project failed, we would do what we do with all other failures - learn from them and do better next time. A comparison can be made to the settling of the Americas by the Europeans - and this is highly unlikely to turn into Darien, Panama. (Woo obscure history reference)

2. "What are we going to DO? There's no oil/aliens/sexy ladies/giant welcoming mat on Mars, so we should just not go."
This is silly for several reasons. We don't have to send giant refineries on rocketships to do worthwhile things on Mars. This kind of argument, if turned into policy, would have seen every single space venture denied. I mean... What do we really do on the ISS? I don't see them sending down Morgan Freeman clones.

Successful colonization of Mars would - beyond making us live in a real life science fiction novel - test new technologies and help us refine and adapt them to further space venturing. The logic behind this one is that we're expected to just build the USG Ishumura on our first space venture and just skip all the preceding tech levels. This isn't a pointless venture, it's following the natural progression of things.

3. "Why don't they just colonize the ocean"
We totally should! Write to your local congressmen/minister/supreme leader and tell them to get on that. Did you know that our species isn't a hivemind, and that we can multitask whenever we want? Me either! The things you learn...

4. "Space science is expensive, and this project relies on things that do not even exist yet."
We've been throwing things at Mars for awhile now. We've even thrown a homerun a few times with objects that have left the solar system. The ONLY thing holding back sending the entire population of Scotland up to Mars is the lack of people wanting to fund it... And the prospect of space highlanders vaporizing London.

5. "This is just an excuse for people to leave their spouses"
Uhhh

I'm not sure a willingness to leave your spouse back on Earth is the sort of thing I would look favorably on in potential applicants.

"So, how do you feel about permanent, life-long commitments?"

"...Uh..."

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