Epic's Tappy Chicken is a Flappy Bird Clone Made in Unreal Engine 4

Epic's Tappy Chicken is a Flappy Bird Clone Made in Unreal Engine 4

Tappy Chicken Epic Games 310x

Tappy Chicken was made by one Epic Games employee with no coding experience.

Epic Games is full steam ahead with Unreal Engine 4, and they want all the newbie games designers to hop on their platform. It's easier than ever now, thanks to the new monthly subscription model, but the engine can still be a little intimidating, yeah?

Tappy Chicken, which is available for free on iOS and Android, shows how easy it is to make a game in UE4. The unapologetic Flappy Bird clone was made by one Epic Games employee -- artist Shane Caudle -- who has absolutely no programming experience to speak of. Thanks to new feature sets like Blueprints visual scripting, Epic thinks game design is easier than ever.

Epic says the game took about a week to make, from the procedurally-generated level, to the menu and UI design.

If you don't want to (or can't) play Tappy Chicken on your phone, an HTML5 version for your browser is in the works, too.

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Aren't all flappy bird games made by people with "absolutely no programming experience to speak of"? Or discernible talent to speak of. Why is this seen as a positive thing? Some games (most notably some of the best indie games of the past few years) are made almost purely with original code, that's how you ensure good systems.

Yes you can take short cuts and make cloned games. Being able to code and understand code is something extremely useful for anyone at any level in the gaming industry. If you have a coding problem how is that person supposed to grasp what that means? Yes UE4 makes game design easy but the worry is always of people are using a system of premade canned scrips you'll just end up with design being led by those systems and end up with a glob of homogenized games made by people who haven't learned anything new about game design.

UE4 seems best coupled with people who DO know how to code but who can then leave the artists to work better. I don't care how great your 'engine' is, if you want to do something really original then the only solution might come through new code. What happens when that person comes across a problem where the best solution is coding based? Like i said it's just a fear but design systems like this by their nature tend to lead people down set paths of design.

I find it a bit excessive to use one of the most powerful engines in the world to create a Flappy Bird clone, like, a complete overkill, like, cutting a steak with a chainsaw.

If this works with more complex things, then that is excellent. If your average Joe could pick up this engine and start making video games, that would allow for many new people to start making games. You wouldn't need a degree in coding anymore, just a vision.

Assuming that it's this easy across the board. Which it might not be. Still, I'm interested.

Scrumpmonkey:
Aren't all flappy bird games made by people with "absolutely no programming experience to speak of"? Or discernible talent to speak of. Why is this seen as a positive thing? Some games (most notably some of the best indie games of the past few years) are made almost purely with original code, that's how you ensure good systems.

Yes you can take short cuts and make cloned games. Being able to code and understand code is something extremely useful for anyone at any level in the gaming industry. If you have a coding problem how is that person supposed to grasp what that means? Yes UE4 makes game design easy but the worry is always of people are using a system of premade canned scrips you'll just end up with design being led by those systems and end up with a glob of homogenized games made by people who haven't learned anything new about game design.

UE4 seems best coupled with people who DO know how to code but who can then leave the artists to work better. I don't care how great your 'engine' is, if you want to do something really original then the only solution might come through new code. What happens when that person comes across a problem where the best solution is coding based? Like i said it's just a fear but design systems like this by their nature tend to lead people down set paths of design.

Have you actually seen the Blueprints system? You don't use pre-built canned scripts, you use the same functions you use in C++, the only difference is worrying about syntax. There are more developed functions, but those, too, are equivalents of C++ functions used in libraries. In fact, if you have no idea of the basic concepts of computer programming, you WILL NOT BE ABLE TO use Blueprints. Also, funny story, Blueprints is the first programming language I started learning, it made learning C++ afterwards much easier, because I already knew the concepts (I've been learning programming for about 2 months.)

Theminimanx:
If this works with more complex things, then that is excellent. If your average Joe could pick up this engine and start making video games, that would allow for many new people to start making games. You wouldn't need a degree in coding anymore, just a vision.

Assuming that it's this easy across the board. Which it might not be. Still, I'm interested.

It's still coding, just coding with visually connecting functions, the same ones used in C++.
P.S. Also, loops are GOTO loops, which would make a Blueprint translated to C++ really hard to navigate. I don't know if Blueprints get translated to C++ before compiled to binary, though.

DonTsetsi:

Theminimanx:
If this works with more complex things, then that is excellent. If your average Joe could pick up this engine and start making video games, that would allow for many new people to start making games. You wouldn't need a degree in coding anymore, just a vision.

Assuming that it's this easy across the board. Which it might not be. Still, I'm interested.

It's still coding, just coding with visually connecting functions, the same ones used in C++.
P.S. Also, loops are GOTO loops, which would make a Blueprint translated to C++ really hard to navigate. I don't know if Blueprints get translated to C++ before compiled to binary, though.

Okay, I did not understand a single word of that. I assume (do correct me if I'm wrong) that you mean code is still being written, but with a different interface. If so, that's irrelevent to my point. I don't care about the technicalities of how UE4 works, but about how intuitive it is to newcomers.

Theminimanx:

DonTsetsi:

Theminimanx:
If this works with more complex things, then that is excellent. If your average Joe could pick up this engine and start making video games, that would allow for many new people to start making games. You wouldn't need a degree in coding anymore, just a vision.

Assuming that it's this easy across the board. Which it might not be. Still, I'm interested.

It's still coding, just coding with visually connecting functions, the same ones used in C++.
P.S. Also, loops are GOTO loops, which would make a Blueprint translated to C++ really hard to navigate. I don't know if Blueprints get translated to C++ before compiled to binary, though.

Okay, I did not understand a single word of that. I assume (do correct me if I'm wrong) that you mean code is still being written, but with a different interface. If so, that's irrelevent to my point. I don't care about the technicalities of how UE4 works, but about how intuitive it is to newcomers.

No, you don't write the code, but the way it works is the same. You just arrange the functions in a block diagram. The one difference is that you don't have to learn any syntax. Just arrange the same functions you would use if you were using code.
P.S. Here are some basic tutorials which would better explain what the system actually is

https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/blueprint-basics

DonTsetsi:

Theminimanx:

DonTsetsi:

It's still coding, just coding with visually connecting functions, the same ones used in C++.
P.S. Also, loops are GOTO loops, which would make a Blueprint translated to C++ really hard to navigate. I don't know if Blueprints get translated to C++ before compiled to binary, though.

Okay, I did not understand a single word of that. I assume (do correct me if I'm wrong) that you mean code is still being written, but with a different interface. If so, that's irrelevent to my point. I don't care about the technicalities of how UE4 works, but about how intuitive it is to newcomers.

No, you don't write the code, but the way it works is the same. You just arrange the functions in a block diagram. The one difference is that you don't have to learn any syntax. Just arrange the same functions you would use if you were using code.
P.S. Here are some basic tutorials which would better explain what the system actually is

https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/blueprint-basics

That's basically what I meant by intuitive. Ah, semantics, the death of true discussion.
Also, thanks a lot for the link! It looks really interesting!

 

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