Funded MOD-t Indiegogo Wants to Bring 3D Printing to the Masses

Funded MOD-t Indiegogo Wants to Bring 3D Printing to the Masses

$249 gets you a fully functioning 3D printer, delivered in May 2015.

3D Printers are quickly becoming all the rage, but owning your own is still an expensive endeavor. I backed the Rapide One with some friends earlier this year -- a promising piece of hardware that cost $1,500 post-early backer discount.

$1,500 is a steep entry point for what still amounts to a hobby, not to mention the cost of materials. But New Matter might have the most promising inexpensive entry into 3D printing at the moment, even if it's not shipping until next year.

The Mew Matter MOD-t 3D printer is up on Indiegogo right now, and $249 will get you a fully functioning printer, plus a spool of filament to get you started. $249 isn't chump change, either, but it's absolutely an approachable price level for those who want a 3D printer in their home.

With 30 days left, the $375,000 campaign is already fully funded -- over $485,000 and rising -- and well over 2,000 MOD-t printers have been claimed. Once the MOD-t is out in the open, New Matter's online store will offer up product designs, as well as act as the community hub.

The Verge has a solid in-depth look at New Matter and the Mod-t as well. If you're on the fence about buying a printer, the Mod-t might just tip the scales.

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Ok - at this price? This is nice.

The idea of a cash-shop for designs... well - I'm really not surprised about it. A kind of Steam store for print designs.

If anything I'm curious as to how open it is for designs not from their own proprietary design program. If I make a model in Maya, can I import, convert and print it?

Still, for the price: NICE

Okay, so...remember that guy in Japan who printed his own functional guns? Even if he meant no harm, merely an experiment into the idea, he opened up a can of worms. I remark now as I remarked then: Being able to print your own untraceable gun (and they look like silly toys too) is going to cause a BIG PROBLEM in the future.

Well, here we are.

A mass-produced model 3D printer system, costing you about the same as a last-generation console. Someone out there knows where to find the right designs, the kind the Japanese man was using. Someone will be a real shit and print some toy guns that ya wouldn't bat an eyelash at and won't show up in metal detectors, but can kill.

I would advise caution to those living in the 3D printing age.

FalloutJack:
Okay, so...remember that guy in Japan who printed his own functional guns? Even if he meant no harm, merely an experiment into the idea, he opened up a can of worms. I remark now as I remarked then: Being able to print your own untraceable gun (and they look like silly toys too) is going to cause a BIG PROBLEM in the future.

Well, here we are.

A mass-produced model 3D printer system, costing you about the same as a last-generation console. Someone out there knows where to find the right designs, the kind the Japanese man was using. Someone will be a real shit and print some toy guns that ya wouldn't bat an eyelash at and won't show up in metal detectors, but can kill.

I would advise caution to those living in the 3D printing age.

I don't really see how this is problematic compared to regular firearms, unless we're talking about places where getting one is nearly impossible.

Even if the gun doesn't set off metal detectors, it'll still need ammo which I'm assuming will set them off. And that's really only an advantage in airports and the few other places where they have metal detectors(although the use might be more widespread in other parts of the world).

So really, I don't see much reason to be worried about getting shot by 3D printed guns more than I'd worry about getting shot with a normal gun.

Obviously the access to 3D printed firearms is probably not a good thing, but I don't think it's gonna be catastrophic and any effort towards getting rid of them would be better directed towards normal firearms.

$250 sounds nice for the 6x5x4" object size. I've wanted a 3D printer, but have been holding off on buying one because a year ago I dropped $1700 on a tabletop CNC mill (and have watched Aluminum and HDPE chips fly around since). Being able to combine precision, heavy duty parts with parts the generate little waste and go from 3D models to finished workpieces[1] fast for a little more would be great.

[1] If anyone could recommend some good free CAM software (Windows or Linux), please do. Manual programing keeps my brain in shape but being able to make something I need fast or a fancy design is my next step for my machine after I switch to a better computer(never go with an add on parallel port card).

FalloutJack:
Okay, so...remember that guy in Japan who printed his own functional guns? Even if he meant no harm, merely an experiment into the idea, he opened up a can of worms. I remark now as I remarked then: Being able to print your own untraceable gun (and they look like silly toys too) is going to cause a BIG PROBLEM in the future.

Well, here we are.

A mass-produced model 3D printer system, costing you about the same as a last-generation console. Someone out there knows where to find the right designs, the kind the Japanese man was using. Someone will be a real shit and print some toy guns that ya wouldn't bat an eyelash at and won't show up in metal detectors, but can kill.

I would advise caution to those living in the 3D printing age.

I won't say you're wrong, but that "someone" will be in for a rude surprise if they think using the usual plastic resin in their printer is going to net them a serviceable firearm. "Plastic" guns still need to be manufactured from special ballistic-grade polymers - not the kind of stuff you'd be picking up with your typical hobby kit. The kind of plastic makes a very significant difference, and anyone thinking they're going to just print up a pistol and shoot me is in more danger from the weapon in their hand than I am.

Now I'm not ruling out the possibility of some nut-job getting their hands on the "proper" ingredients and posing an actual threat, just that we've really nothing to fear from most of the individuals who'd buy one.

Hmmm, and my companies own 3D printer did not even get a whisper when we were successfully funded on kickstarter last year. Escapist, I am disappoint!

Nah, I kid. I am curious how open source this things hardware and software will be, and how easy it would be to import custom models from external software like Blender, Modo, and Max.

FalloutJack:
Okay, so...remember that guy in Japan who printed his own functional guns?

The only 3d printed guns I remember are one that was fully 3d printed but only good for a single shot (if that, at least safely), and a longer use one that was 3d printed... except for the most important parts, ie the barrel, which were the standard commercially produced kind.

As far as Im aware there havent been any 3d printed guns that have been any more remarkable than the "prison DIY" type made from things like sections of plastic plumbing pipe.

OT: Depending on the resolution, size, etc, and with the caveat that they actually deliver whats promised... thats a very good price point. We sell a "cheap" $1500 3d printer at my work, and I can see a $250 version being extremely popular with the general non-techy public.

FalloutJack:
Okay, so...remember that guy in Japan who printed his own functional guns? Even if he meant no harm, merely an experiment into the idea, he opened up a can of worms. I remark now as I remarked then: Being able to print your own untraceable gun (and they look like silly toys too) is going to cause a BIG PROBLEM in the future.

Well, here we are.

A mass-produced model 3D printer system, costing you about the same as a last-generation console. Someone out there knows where to find the right designs, the kind the Japanese man was using. Someone will be a real shit and print some toy guns that ya wouldn't bat an eyelash at and won't show up in metal detectors, but can kill.

I would advise caution to those living in the 3D printing age.

I was just thinking this. 3D printed guns right now might be expensive and unusable, but within the next few years they could become a serious problem. Gun control might become completely futile, even in countries which currently have effective gun control, like the UK.

As a tangent to the whole 3d guns thing, would anyone well versed in guns/physics comment on the possibility of maybe 3d printed bullets? I mean, a bullet is just a projectile right, so isn't it possible?

vun:
Ammo count

Somehow, I see the person capable of this finding the means to get around that, now that hiding an actual gun in plain sight is easier. I'm thinking of a composite bullet. Print that? Dunno.

Kieve:
Manufacturing

The amount of people who are getting these printers is enough possible Wild Mass Guessing that a number of them could get it right and make trouble. Still, in regards to Plunk, there is still the future. That could be trouble.

Caffiene:
Reliability

Can't say. Don't know, personally. Didn't read so deeply into it as to know how long said guns lasted. DO know that advancements are always moving up. Even if it's not efficient NOW, it will later.

Looks like the reason this is so cheap is because it can only work in plastic.

Sure, other 3D printers cost a lot more, but with them, the right materials, and the specs, you could make fully functional M1911's with the magazine if you wanted.

Such designs aren't exactly that hard to get ahold of either.

 

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