Moon Impact Proves Earth 60 Million Years Older Than We Thought

Moon Impact Proves Earth 60 Million Years Older Than We Thought

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Theia's time capsules showed two geochemists how it happened.

"It is not possible to give an exact date for the formation of the Earth," says geochemist Guillaume Avice, who - along with Bernard Marty - has been closely examining the Theia impact remnants. "What this work does is to show that the Earth is older than we thought, by around 60 million years."

He and Marty have been examining xenon left behind in Theia's 'time capsules' - small pockets of gases trapped inside ancient quartz found in South Africa and Australia - comparing them to current isotopic ratios. The result is fascinating; while we don't know precisely when the Earth formed, thanks to this new data it would seem it formed only 40 million years after the solar system itself, not 100 million as was previously thought.

"This might seem a small difference, but it is important," says Marty. "These differences set time boundaries on how the planets evolved, especially through the major collisions in deep time which shaped the solar system." The two geochemists presented their results at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry Conference earlier this week.

The xenon time capsules allowed the geochemists to calculate when the atmosphere was being formed, at which point it was hit by a planet-sized body; the Theia incident that we now know formed the moon. That impact would have completely destroyed whatever primordial atmosphere had been developing, forcing the process to begin anew.

There's no such thing as 'classical geography' indicators as old as this - no rock layers, no pristine material - so these xenon time capsules found in billion-year-old quartz are all that's left of what came before, at the moment Theia impacted.

Source: Discovery

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So has the moon-impact model gotten a YEC response yet?
They're always an entertaining mix of laughably stupid and worryingly sad.

MCerberus:
So has the moon-impact model gotten a YEC response yet?
They're always an entertaining mix of laughably stupid and worryingly sad.

A wizard did it, of course. You know that.

Huh. So... If the moon-generating impact destroyed the early atmosphere, could it be that one reason Earth is temperate and Venus is hellish, is because of that freak occurrence? An interesting spin on the ol' "are we alone" question.

Jeez, Earth, a mere 40 million years old and already banging other planets and making babies. I tell you, this universe is going to hell.

60 million? Don't you mean 6000?

MCerberus:
So has the moon-impact model gotten a YEC response yet?

The collision hypothesis itself being old, it's been responded to a lot. Either "science is wrong" or "God is testing us" or "Satan is deceiving us."

I doubt the new evidence changes any of those responses.

Pyrian:
Huh. So... If the moon-generating impact destroyed the early atmosphere, could it be that one reason Earth is temperate and Venus is hellish, is because of that freak occurrence? An interesting spin on the ol' "are we alone" question.

IT really is curious.

Chimpzy:
Jeez, Earth, a mere 40 million years old and already banging other planets and making babies. I tell you, this universe is going to hell.

And they didn't even put a ring on it.

I question what is this for? Any sane person knows this, or at least can understand this. And Yec and their ilk will just deny this and be trapped by their insane toll logic.

That said, the Earth is older than we thought? so its 15,060,000,000 years old? or something like that? Though one has to question like earlier in this thread. Did that impact save us from the fate of Venus?

Orks da best:
I question what is this for? Any sane person knows this, or at least can understand this. And Yec and their ilk will just deny this and be trapped by their insane toll logic.

That said, the Earth is older than we thought? so its 15,060,000,000 years old? or something like that? Though one has to question like earlier in this thread. Did that impact save us from the fate of Venus?

Actually they've estimated it to be about 4.54 billion years old, though with this bit of data it would make it 4.6 billion. Though, in all honesty, aside from the people getting paid to tell us this stuff and other science people, who the hell really cares if the Earth is a few million years older than we thought?

 

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