World's Largest Game Collection Sold for $750,000

World's Largest Game Collection Sold for $750,000

A collector auctioned off over 11,000 games for $750,000 to an anonymous bidder.

Michael Thomasson won the Guinness World Record for owning the biggest collection of video games in 2012. This week, he sold that collection for three-quarters of a million dollars.

We reported earlier this month that Thomasson was looking to sell his collection to assist his family with their needs. He posted the collection on video game auction site GameGavel. The auction started at one dollar and lasted for eight days before ending the evening of Wednesday 11th after 56 bids. The winner was anonymous, but now owns the largest personal video game collection in the world.

The collection included over 11,000 unique titles, most of them in "pristine" condition. Over 8,300 included their original packaging and manual while over 2,600 of those were in their original shrink wrap. Thomasson would have had to buy an average of a game a day to reach that volume in thirty years. Also, his collection included every major video game console as well as rare and obscure gaming platforms.

The winning bid of $750,000 means the games sold for an average of about $68 each. Thomasson probably got a little bit more than he would have at GameStop.

Source: GameGavel

Edit: A link and the length of the auction were incorrect and have been corrected. Thank you to Adam Locking for pointing it out!

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Nearly $70 per game? That's next-gen prices right there! :)

Sigfodr:
The winning bid of $750,000 means the games sold for an average of about $68 each. Thomasson probably got a little bit more than he would have at GameStop.

Shots fired!

OT: That's...not bad, actually, considering. Sure, nearly $70 a game is highway robbery for certain games, but others that (I'm going to guess) are in his collection STILL sell for $100, $200, or more, depending on the game - making it a steal.

Did he actually get paid? This is way to high a price. Feels like the nintendo cart someone was selling awhile back. People just bidding to be part of the story then just never paying.

Sigfodr:
The winning bid of $750,000 means the games sold for an average of about $68 each. Thomasson probably got a little bit more than he would have at GameStop.

He got roughly $740,000 more than he would have at Gamestop.

Sigfodr:
We reported earlier this month that Thomasson was looking to sell his collection to assist his family with their needs. He posted the collection on video game auction site GameGavel. The auction started at one dollar and lasted for four days before ending Sunday morning after 56 bids. The winner was anonymous, but now owns the largest personal video game collection in the world.

The auction ran for well over a week, and you've used the same link twice instead of linking to the previous escapist article.

I've got nothing against Gamestop, but yeah, that's a hell of a lot of money. I don't think I'd be able to play through all those games in a lifetime.

CriticalMiss:

He got roughly $740,000 more than he would have at Gamestop.

That's clearly a lie right there. We'd all know he'd get $50 in cash or $100 in store credit and 5% off Watch_Dogs.

Now watch as the bidder disappears and doesn't pay.

From what I saw, that collection could have easily sold for a million.

Sounds to me like the guy got ripped off, as I would imagine more than a few of those games are collectables (especially with original packaging and in pristine condition) and would likely be worth much more than $60-70 a pop. Of course this is just speculation on my part, just would imagine that such a collection would go for much much more than that.

Adam Locking:
The auction ran for well over a week, and you've used the same link twice instead of linking to the previous escapist article.

Thank you! Corrections have been made.

gamegod25:
Sounds to me like the guy got ripped off, as I would imagine more than a few of those games are collectables (especially with original packaging and in pristine condition) and would likely be worth much more than $60-70 a pop. Of course this is just speculation on my part, just would imagine that such a collection would go for much much more than that.

But presumably for every game worth hundreds of dollars there are twenty that are essentially worthless. Sounds like a pretty fair deal to me - if anything, I think he did well out of the deal, presuming the buyer pays up.

Flatfrog:

gamegod25:
Sounds to me like the guy got ripped off, as I would imagine more than a few of those games are collectables (especially with original packaging and in pristine condition) and would likely be worth much more than $60-70 a pop. Of course this is just speculation on my part, just would imagine that such a collection would go for much much more than that.

But presumably for every game worth hundreds of dollars there are twenty that are essentially worthless. Sounds like a pretty fair deal to me - if anything, I think he did well out of the deal, presuming the buyer pays up.

Agreed. The problem with "largest collection" is that you start adding filler. And working at multiple game stores he would get access to every horrible game ever released to pad out his collection. Stuff that the store sells for $4.

I'm waiting to hear whether this gets paid. I can't believe it would sell this high. Anyone with that kind of money, who was interested in collecting vintage games should already own a very large percentage of anything they might actually care about from this collection. Why overpay for the select items they might still need?

Honestly I thought he would be lucky to get the $50K someone said a game dev bid. You never get anywhere near full value selling in a huge lot like this.

...Thomasson was looking to sell his collection to assist his family with their needs... The winning bid of $750,000 means the games sold for an average of about $68 each. Thomasson probably got a little bit more than he would have at GameStop.

I hope his family either; A, has some serious bills (medical, risk of foreclosure on his or an extended family member's house, etc) B, kids about to go to college or C, credit card bills have piled up so much from increasing his collection that it's time to get rid of them (both the games and the bills) or a combination of all the above. Otherwise, I can imagine him taking the kids and $600,000 to $700,000 of that money on a spending spree (possibly to build a new collection).

That Gamestop jab would sting, but GS's execs are too busy counting the money from buying back Watchdogs from impulsive buyers for 50%-60% of what they payed on launched day and selling it for just under MSRP as a "used" game back to the next guys to walk in the door.

Just lets focus on the fact you can take games into stores like Gamestop(or GAME in the UK) rather than being stuck with an unresellable digital copy of lets say the over hyped Watchdogs :P

Haters going to hate but by god lets focus on hating game makers for making rubbish or sub par games rather than a compony that's getting stuck with millions of copies of a terrible game they might have drouble selling on :P

I wonder if the AVGN was the winning bid or in the running?

Darks63:
I wonder if the AVGN was the winning bid or in the running?

it would be interesting, however i think he already has the majority of the collection, mostly donated. he said he finds a lot of games in garage sales too.

Given the amount of money he has spend on buying and storing all of these games over the years he is not making much profit here

-M

Well, I suppose when times get tight you have to leverage what assets you can to help out those you love. Can't help but wonder if the person who bought it was buying it as a long term investment, hoping to keep it sealed away for another 3-4 decades before selling it for 3x the value.

Could you imagine if he has 2 kids or something but they must sleep in the same room because all the other rooms are storage game rooms? not accusing him of doing that, but that would be funny. Just to note, I noticed alot of those counters rifling through sports games which we all know are completely worthless. 750,000 sounds too much

I guess whoever won could use the copies of NHL 94 for the Super nintendo, sega genesis and sega cd as paperweights?

 

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