Enthusiast Recreates Cyvasse Board Game from Game of Thrones

Enthusiast Recreates Cyvasse Board Game from Game of Thrones

Michael Le Page developed a playable game based on hints and clues in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire.

When the ambitious schemers in George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series take a break from playing the game of thrones, many sit down to play a game of cyvasse. The fictional two player strategy game features prominently in the fourth and fifth books of the series, A Feast for Crows and A Dance with Dragons. Cyvasse is popular in Dorne, and with HBO's Game of Thrones gearing up for its fifth season by casting several Dornish characters, the strategy board game will likely make an appearance soon. You don't have to wait to meet the Prince of Dorne to play the game yourself, however. Game of Thrones fan Michael Le Page has developed a playable set of rules for cyvasse, and a 3D printed board and playing pieces for the game. A complete set will cost you $305 plus shipping from Shapeways. Le Page is also working on a browser game based on the same set of rules.

"George R. R. Martin has said that the game is inspired by Blitzkrieg, Stratego, and especially chess, but he has purposely left the actual rules undefined," says Le Page in his interpretation video about the rules of Cyvasse. Le Page used the limited details available in the books about how the game is played and filled in the gaps to make a functioning strategy game. "There's not a lot in the book to go off," says Le Page. "We have a list of quotes that suggest the pieces are made of onyx and ivory, Dragons can be taken by Trebuchets and that Heavy Horses were 'circling around his rear.'"

Le Page's version of the game is played on a 91-square hexagonal grid (like in Blitzkrieg) with three different colors of hexes, and each player begins with twenty six pieces of ten different types. Like in chess, each type of piece has different rules for movement, but unlike chess the pieces must follow a tiered system for capturing other pieces. A player's Dragon (a tier 4 piece) can capture any other piece, while Rabble (tier 1) can only capture other tier 1 pieces. Terrain tiles add to the tier level of some pieces, and lower tier pieces can combine in flanking maneuvers to take down higher tier enemy pieces. Like Stratego, players set up their pieces at the beginning of the game in secret, behind a screen. The goal of the game is to capture the opposing player's King. Le Page's full rules are available on the A Song of Ice and Fire forums.

Le Page developed his rules with input from others on the A Song of Ice and Fire forums. The designs for the cyvasse board and pieces are his own, and aren't affliated with or endorsed by George R.R. Martin's work in any way. If the $305 price tag for the 3D printed set puts you off, you can always make your own copy of the game using Le Page's paper version. Of course, given that in Westeros cyvasse game pieces are made of onyx and ivory, a paper version isn't like to impress any Dornish princes.

Source: Toy News

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Hey Marla, Thanks for the write up!

Those of us who have been playing it so far have been having a lot of fun with it. It's really no more complicated than Chess when it comes down to it (although like Chess, you wouldn't expect to learn the rules in a four minute video!). Anyone who is interested should definitely join the conversation on the A Song of Ice and Fire forums, or look at my "Rules of Cyvasse" explanation video :) Cheers!

$305.. $200 more and I could buy a 3d printer...

racrevel:
$305.. $200 more and I could buy a 3d printer...

And for $300 less I can buy my favourite coffee. Look at us doing addition and subtraction. It just gives me a warm fuzzy feeling inside. #feedingthetrolls

Michael Le Page:

racrevel:
$305.. $200 more and I could buy a 3d printer...

And for $300 less I can buy my favourite coffee. Look at us doing addition and subtraction. It just gives me a warm fuzzy feeling inside. #feedingthetrolls

I didn't realise something as minuscule as pointing out disproportionate costs was trolling these days.. Man has that bar been lowered.

racrevel:

Michael Le Page:

racrevel:
$305.. $200 more and I could buy a 3d printer...

And for $300 less I can buy my favourite coffee. Look at us doing addition and subtraction. It just gives me a warm fuzzy feeling inside. #feedingthetrolls

I didn't realise something as minuscule as pointing out disproportionate costs was trolling these days.. Man has that bar been lowered.

My point being that for something to be disproportionate it has to be comparable, and the comparison you made is not a real one, so that's why I responded sarcastically. If you're not trolling, then I guess you haven't actually thought this through: Sure, you could spend $500 on a 3D printer (curious to know where that deal is - the cheapest I've seen is ~$700), and you'd still have to spend another ~$300 to make something equivalent to this set - you would then have to paint the colours on the board since no multicolour 3D printer is available on the market for anything like that cheap. FYI I actually looked into making this as 5 single colour prints (there are 5 colours in the set), and the cost was nearly $800 in materials - a really "cheap" deal if you choose to do it that way. I'm actually quite proud that I figured out how to get it down to $300 (using full-colour sandstone for the board - I think *that* printer costs upwards of $10k). Shapeways is really quite a good deal as 3D printing services go right now because it has production volume on its side. Individual 3D printers are going to have to get quite a bit cheaper/more capable yet before it's a good value proposition for every household to have one. Until then I'm happy to stick with Shapeways.

 

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