D&D Movie Lawsuit Will Proceed to Trial

D&D Movie Lawsuit Will Proceed to Trial

dnd Wayans

There will be no settlement.

Negotiations for a settlement in the lawsuit between Hasbro and Sweetpea over the rights to make a Dungeons & Dragons movie have failed and the case will proceed to trial. Sweetpea alleges that it has the license to make a Dungeons & Dragons movie, while Hasbro contends that that license has expired. There were several delays - including postponing the original trial date from March 25 to July 1. Both sides have agreed there will be no further settlement negotiations and a trial date has been set for September 16.

Warner brothers initially announced its intent to produce a Dungeons & Dragons movie in March of 2013 - likely having gotten the idea that a new edition of D&D was on the way. Shortly after the announcement was made, Hasbro filed a suit to prevent that movie from going into production. Hasbro maintains that the movie rights to D&D have reverted to them, since Sweetpea went five years without producing a true theatrical release of a movie - only television movies - which according to Hasbro don't count. Sweetpea maintains that they have exclusive and permanent rights to produce D&D live-action films.

The 2000 D&D movie is widely considered a flop. Though some disagree.

Source: ICv2

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The first two D&D films are amusing to watch but not because they're "good"; they're diabolically cheesy and cliched, but then thats quite often what a good session is.

The third film however... its actually kind of neat, if only for the characterisation of evil and how they manage to portray more than your standard "Im doing this cause Im evil lol" (though that still exists in small doses).

So yeah, feel free to keep pumping out D&D films! Ill just be really surprised if theres a genuine block buster D&D title any time soon.

It tells me something that I've never heard of the 2nd and 3rd D&D movies.

Gawd the 1st one was awful. So bad that it's unwatchable. Not quite Star Wars Holiday Special Bad, but very, very bad.

BTW, for those up to the challenge...I present to you the Star Wars Holiday Special. I dare you to try to watch the entire thing:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xn5gsj_the-star-wars-holiday-special_shortfilms

Please let the rights have reverted back...

How on earth does this need a trial? If they had a contract, it should have stipulated what was necessary to keep the contract, and the conditions don't sound at all complicated. Do they lose the rights if they don't make movies frequently enough? (Y/N) Does the contract specify that they have to be theatrical releases? (Y/N) How convoluted does the contract have to be for this to not be open and shut? I know contracts can be like that, but how do they even word those points in such a way that it's vague enough to necessitate a trial?

Fasckira:
The third film however... its actually kind of neat, if only for the characterisation of evil and how they manage to portray more than your standard "Im doing this cause Im evil lol" (though that still exists in small doses).

I feel the same way. It was basically a feature-length version of what happens when the DM decides to be a complete prick to the paladin. "If you do something evil you lose all your powers, eh? Well let's see how you cope with a situation where you have to be evil! Haha!"

To be honest though, I'm amazed people care about the rights enough to go to court over them. Book of Vile Darkness is quite entertaining, but it's still not that good - I feel like three strikes and you're out should apply to D&D movies. There probably isn't going to be a good one.

According to IMDB, the 2012 D&D movie did get a theatrical release in Germany, Viet Nam, Australia and Lebanon. So I think Hasbro might have some trouble with this one.

Will Jeremy Irons be in it? That's all I care about.

Never have quite understood why anyone would want to make a movie about a game which emulates the action and stories of fantasy fiction.

Just make a movie about a particular property, or a novel based on that. Most of which are pretty terrible themselves, but nothing on par with the awfulness that was the D&D movie.

Yes I know they want to capitalize on the fact that everyone has heard 'Dungeons and Dragons' and a lot fewer have heard of 'Forgotten Realms', but still. Ugh.

Dan Shive:
How on earth does this need a trial? If they had a contract, it should have stipulated what was necessary to keep the contract, and the conditions don't sound at all complicated. Do they lose the rights if they don't make movies frequently enough? (Y/N) Does the contract specify that they have to be theatrical releases? (Y/N) How convoluted does the contract have to be for this to not be open and shut? I know contracts can be like that, but how do they even word those points in such a way that it's vague enough to necessitate a trial?

Probably over what constitutes a theatrical release. And there might be other issues as well as far as what the language in the contract really means. It's not always unambiguous.

 

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