Newly Discovered Planet Has Longest Yearly Revolution

Newly Discovered Planet Has Longest Yearly Revolution

Kepler 421b

The exoplanet orbits an orange Type-K star which lies roughly 1,000 light years from Earth.

Recently discovered Kepler-421b takes 704 Earth days to complete one orbit which, researchers say, give it the longest year known for any transiting alien world. Around the size of Uranus, the exoplanet is located about 1,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Lyra. It was spotted by NASA's Kepler space telescope- adding 421b to a long list over 1,000 alien planets the spacecraft has discovered to date.

So far, the majority of Kepler's finds have been worlds that orbit relatively close to their parent stars since they transit relatively frequently. The instrument has generally required three transits to conclusively identify an exoplanet. According to researchers, Kepler-421b was detected after it crossed its host star's face just twice.

421b circles its parent star (a cooler and dimmer sun than Earth's) at an average distance of 100 million miles (160 million kilometers). This distance places the exoplanet outside its solar system's boundary between gaseous and rocky planets- referred to as the "snow line". The fact that 421b, a gaseous planet, has remained behind that line is remarkable because most giant world migrate inward significantly over time and eventually complete their orbit in days or even hours

In a statement, lead study author David Kipping from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Massachusetts said, "Finding Kepler-421b was a stroke of luck. The farther a planet is from its star, the less likely it is to transit the star from Earth's point of view. It has to line up just right."

Kepler-421b does not have the longest year of any known alien planet. Many non-transiting worlds have much more radical orbits, such as the gas giant GU Piscium b that takes about 160,000 years to complete one rotation around its host star.

Leave a comment below and let us know what you think about this discovery!

Source: Space.com

Photo Credit: David A. Aguilar

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They really need to start giving news stars and planets real names, if only to attract more attention to astronomy.

Canopus, Sirius, Tau Ceti stick in people's minds more than Kepler-421b ever will.

beastro:
They really need to start giving news stars and planets real names, if only to attract more attention to astronomy.

Canopus, Sirius, Tau Ceti stick in people's minds more than Kepler-421b ever will.

Well Kepler-421b means it's the second planet(b), around the 421st star with planets the Kepler observatory has confirmed(from a pool of about 150,000 objects of interest).

It's found over 900 planets, so that's a lot of names. ;)

And this is a non-important piece of information. Come on 704 days... that puts on just a slightly longer year than Mars.
I mean seriously... what is so wow about it I mean we have planets in our own solar system that take +100 years to complete an orbit.

And at a 1000 light years away dear sweet what is the point? These organizations need less funding.. I'm convinced... if they keep putting out time waste 'news' like this they obviously have too much money.

Planet 1000 light years away has a year slightly longer than Mars(686 days) but no where near as long as Jupiter(4,322 days).

BigTuk:
And this is a non-important piece of information. Come on 704 days... that puts on just a slightly longer year than Mars.
I mean seriously... what is so wow about it I mean we have planets in our own solar system that take +100 years to complete an orbit.

And at a 1000 light years away dear sweet what is the point? These organizations need less funding.. I'm convinced... if they keep putting out time waste 'news' like this they obviously have too much money.

Planet 1000 light years away has a year slightly longer than Mars(686 days) but no where near as long as Jupiter(4,322 days).

except it's a planet that was found outside our solar system, we know our own planets orbits around our star, but the universe demands diversity so our star is nothing like the stars that we have found planets orbiting.

actually, our star is smaller than a vast majority of the stars that have exo-planets orbiting them, so gravity that has Mars in orbit is entirely different than the gravity that keeps Kepler-421b in orbit.

If anything, we need more funding for projects like this since discoveries always open doors to more questions.

Kalezian:

BigTuk:
And this is a non-important piece of information. Come on 704 days... that puts on just a slightly longer year than Mars.
I mean seriously... what is so wow about it I mean we have planets in our own solar system that take +100 years to complete an orbit.

And at a 1000 light years away dear sweet what is the point? These organizations need less funding.. I'm convinced... if they keep putting out time waste 'news' like this they obviously have too much money.

Planet 1000 light years away has a year slightly longer than Mars(686 days) but no where near as long as Jupiter(4,322 days).

except it's a planet that was found outside our solar system, we know our own planets orbits around our star, but the universe demands diversity so our star is nothing like the stars that we have found planets orbiting.

actually, our star is smaller than a vast majority of the stars that have exo-planets orbiting them, so gravity that has Mars in orbit is entirely different than the gravity that keeps Kepler-421b in orbit.

If anything, we need more funding for projects like this since discoveries always open doors to more questions.

Uhm dude.. Our star may not be like other stars but all stars share one thing in common... gravity. The orbit of a planet is basically determined by distance from the star relative to the mass of the star. This is why the further out you go from the sun the longer those orbits take and vice-versa. This has been known and has pretty much been the rule . If you see a planet, it's orbiting something.

And no it's not different gravity.. it's the same gravity and inertial forces. Mass of planet. Mass of star, Distance between star and planet and orbital duration. Any scientist worth their salt could use any 3 of those data points to figure out the third, heck the good scientists could use two and get a pretty good ball park of the other two.

So again, this is about as much news as the sun rising. Hm,, a star has something orbiting it...is right up there with 'Cow Pie has flies buzzing around it'. It's not news, it's nothing unusual, it's nothing unexpected. Which makes this piece of news basically a waste of time. .. right up there with "News flash 'shit stinks'". The only purpose of this is basically to wow the less scientifically minded into thinking they're doing something worth while with the money they're getting.

BigTuk:

Kalezian:
-snip-

Uhm dude.. Our star may not be like other stars but all stars share one thing in common... gravity. The orbit of a planet is basically determined by distance from the star relative to the mass of the star. This is why the further out you go from the sun the longer those orbits take and vice-versa. This has been known and has pretty much been the rule . If you see a planet, it's orbiting something.

And no it's not different gravity.. it's the same gravity and inertial forces. Mass of planet. Mass of star, Distance between star and planet and orbital duration. Any scientist worth their salt could use any 3 of those data points to figure out the third, heck the good scientists could use two and get a pretty good ball park of the other two.

So again, this is about as much news as the sun rising. Hm,, a star has something orbiting it...is right up there with 'Cow Pie has flies buzzing around it'. It's not news, it's nothing unusual, it's nothing unexpected. Which makes this piece of news basically a waste of time. .. right up there with "News flash 'shit stinks'". The only purpose of this is basically to wow the less scientifically minded into thinking they're doing something worth while with the money they're getting.

What the original article makes clear (and the Escapist version not so much) is that it's more of a triumph of observation (or stroke of luck, for that matter) than anything interesting astronomically.

The bigger the orbit, the longer the year, the smaller the chance that a planet gets observed transiting. This is basically the observers saying: woohoo, we know there are billions, but we finally noticed one!

I'll grant you, it's still not that interesting, but just maybe a little special. ^^

Blackwell Stith:
Newly Discovered Planet Has Longest Yearly Rotation

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Revolution. Not rotation. If you're talking about orbit, it's revolution. Rotation is the planet spinning. So earth takes about 365 days to complet an orbit, or revolution, around the sun - and 24 hours to complete a rotation. Rotates on it's axis - revolves around the sun...

This is more of a "Look what we can do!" Kind of announcement rather than "Look what we found!" Cutting the required transits down to 2 means we can find new planets much faster than previously, since it would be a whole year less waiting.

beastro:
They really need to start giving news stars and planets real names, if only to attract more attention to astronomy.

Canopus, Sirius, Tau Ceti stick in people's minds more than Kepler-421b ever will.

Putting aside the fact that these are the people that downgraded Pluto, one issue to be had is that an infinite amount of permanent objects in our sky would require as many names.

 

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