Indiegogo-Funded Satire Dear White People Heads to Theaters

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Indiegogo-Funded Satire Dear White People Heads to Theaters

Crowdfunding success-story turned festival hit debuts full trailer

The recent history of crowdfunding and other internet fund-accumulation ventures has seen its share of failures, foul-ups and oddities (anybody for potato salad?) lately. So it's refreshing to see one actually cross the finish line - case in point: Independent filmmaker Justin Simien's Dear White People, a satirical comedy that raised its initial funds via the Indiegogo platform and went on to win backing from Indiewire.

Set at a fictional Ivy League University, the film has been described as social satire taking specific aim at "The Age of Obama" and the very idea of a supposedly "post-racial" America, following various students as they navigate changing issues of race and class among their generation. The first teaser also featured jabs at the films of Tyler Perry, rappers becoming actors and whether or not Gremlins featured racist subtext.

In the main story, Troy (Brandon P. Bell), the popular "non-threatening" head of the overwhelmingly white school's lone historically-black residence hall, is unexpectedly dethroned from his position by "militant activist" Sam (Tessa Thompson) the host of the controversial campus radio show of the title. At issue is a University plan to completey randomize student housing-assignments, which Troy supported as win for diversity but Sam believes is a deliberate attempt to erode dissenting black student voices at the school. Caught up in the drama are Brittany Curran as Troy's white girlfriend, Everybody Hates Chris star Tyler James Williams as a gay black student feeling torn over his lack of affection for black culture and Mad Men's Teyonah Parris as Sam's podcasting "get over it" rival. The conflicts converge and get ugly when a white fraternity's "black-themed" costume party touches off angry emotions - and a riot.

The film has been well-received on the festival circuit, and is now targeting a Fall 2014 theatrical release.

Source: Dear White People

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It seems that part of the message of this movie or at least one of the messages the main character is trying to portray is that culture should be race-restricted and people of a certain race who aren't embracing their "culture" (which in this case is ethnic stereotypes) are just as bad as the other races who are "stealing" said "culture." Feel free to correct me if I am wrong.

I could go off on a tangent because of what I THINK this movie means (e.g "your white, therefore bad, but its not racist because you can't be racist towards white people") but that's probably not what this movie means. I'll wait to comment further until I actually watch it. Now speaking with my taste and personality, I probably won't like it because it looks boring...what do you want from me, I'm the schmuck that's excited for Expendables 3.

TheRundownRabbit:
what do you want from me, I'm the schmuck that's excited for Expendables 3.

Don't be. They dumbed the rating down to PG-13. Which for a film wanting to embrace 80's style action schlock is completely missing the point. It's just gonna be watered-down and boring.

The title of this movie does it discredit. I first thought it was going to be something ripped right from the deepest, darkest (non-pornographic) corners of Tumblr and put into movie form, but this trailer and description actually makes it sound pretty interesting and funny.

Ooooh, now this I'll have too look into. All shot fired across the bow. A poke at neo-militant race politics, perceptions of black culture and the proliferation of its stereotypes, how its caricatured, colorism, afro-identity issues and toxicity within afro-american subcultures. And it's fuckin' funny! Sign me up.

TT Kairen:

TheRundownRabbit:
what do you want from me, I'm the schmuck that's excited for Expendables 3.

Don't be. They dumbed the rating down to PG-13. Which for a film wanting to embrace 80's style action schlock is completely missing the point. It's just gonna be watered-down and boring.

But, but, Wesley Snipes can't function at just a PG-13 level....this just got really lame -3-

Looks like an interesting satire that looks at several interesting view points and isn't one sided.

...

So how long will it be until Fox News takes this as fact and run a long unbalanced segment on it? The trains coming I see.

This will cause ripples. People don't get satire.

The whole race thing has always been slightly confusing to me. I'm from a country where a vast majority of the population is white, and racial relations were always slightly incomprehensible to me, as I never had a thing with it. I'm white, everyone around me is white, all the people I meet on the street are white, all the people I know and interact with are white.

Don't get me wrong, there are people of other races around, but I don't have a frame of reference to see them as anything other than slightly different colored people. As in, people like everyone else, only different hue, like someone wearing exotic clothing or having an unusual hairstyle. I just never came to associate skin color as an important differentiating factor.

As a result, the whole racial relation thing you've got going in the USA just seems weird to me. Like, what the hell levels of weird...

Jandau:
Don't get me wrong, there are people of other races around, but I don't have a frame of reference to see them as anything other than slightly different colored people. As in, people like everyone else, only different hue, like someone wearing exotic clothing or having an unusual hairstyle. I just never came to associate skin color as an important differentiating factor.

As a result, the whole racial relation thing you've got going in the USA just seems weird to me. Like, what the hell levels of weird...

Problem is, lots of people believe that of themselves, without it being true. Very often, when someone say "I don't see race", it's more true to say "I don't see racism". If they don't recognise they see races in different ways, they aren't able to do anything about it.

Out of interest, what nation are you from?

thaluikhain:

Jandau:
Don't get me wrong, there are people of other races around, but I don't have a frame of reference to see them as anything other than slightly different colored people. As in, people like everyone else, only different hue, like someone wearing exotic clothing or having an unusual hairstyle. I just never came to associate skin color as an important differentiating factor.

As a result, the whole racial relation thing you've got going in the USA just seems weird to me. Like, what the hell levels of weird...

Problem is, lots of people believe that of themselves, without it being true. Very often, when someone say "I don't see race", it's more true to say "I don't see racism". If they don't recognise they see races in different ways, they aren't able to do anything about it.

Out of interest, what nation are you from?

You misunderstand. I do see race. Hell, I notice it on the street every day. I just don't get what the big deal is about it. Some people look unusual to me? Hell, a lot of WHITE people look unusual to me.

Also, I was trying to point out how odd the American race relation paradigm looks to someone who isn't immersed into it.

As to where I'm from, I'm from Croatia.

Jandau:
You misunderstand. I do see race. Hell, I notice it on the street every day. I just don't get what the big deal is about it. Some people look unusual to me? Hell, a lot of WHITE people look unusual to me.

Not what I meant. Of course, people literally see people of different races, but "I don't see race" is used as shorthand for "I have no racial biases at all". Likewise, being colourblind.

Jandau:
Also, I was trying to point out how odd the American race relation paradigm looks to someone who isn't immersed into it.

Oh, sure, I can understand that. Race (as is usually thought of) is an arbitrary social thing, which works in all sorts of way in different societies. Notably, in the US, if someone has a black parent and a white parent, they are considered black (at least by most people), which isn't the way it works in lots of other places.

thaluikhain:

Jandau:
You misunderstand. I do see race. Hell, I notice it on the street every day. I just don't get what the big deal is about it. Some people look unusual to me? Hell, a lot of WHITE people look unusual to me.

Not what I meant. Of course, people literally see people of different races, but "I don't see race" is used as shorthand for "I have no racial biases at all". Likewise, being colourblind.

Jandau:
Also, I was trying to point out how odd the American race relation paradigm looks to someone who isn't immersed into it.

Oh, sure, I can sympathise with that. Race (as is usually thought of) is an arbitrary social thing, which works in all sorts of way in different societies. Notably, in the US, if someone has a black parent and a white parent, they are considered black (at least by most people), which isn't the way it works in lots of other places.

The thing is, racial distinctions are simply a manifestation of a broader social mechanism, which is the construction of the Other, the "Us versus Them". And in that, a certain distinction (or a group of distinctions) is used to define your own group and/or the Other. Race is one of them, sure. So is accent, taste in art, clothing, religion, culture in general, etc.

All I meant to say is that where I'm from, race isn't a particularly important distinctive factor. I'm not saying there aren't any biases, but around here, the bias is more focused on nationality (welcome to the Balkans, where the bickering between tiny ethnic groups never ends) than on skin colour.

As a result, when I watched the trailer I was annoyed and confused on an instinctive level (please note the word "instinctive"; rationally I understand the whole thing, I'm just talking about my gut response) - there was a person calling out everyone who's white on some shit, and I'm like "Hey, I'm white, what did I ever do to you?".

The thing here is, the process of constructing the aforementioned Other kicks in here - this girl, through her generalized hostility which I find unprovoked set herself as the Other, and I unconsciously start seeking to construct a framework for her, resulting in a racial bias where there might have been none.

Granted, that's likely one of the points of the movie - to show how needlessly confrontational behavior in racial relations can make a problem worse...

Jandau:
The thing is, racial distinctions are simply a manifestation of a broader social mechanism, which is the construction of the Other, the "Us versus Them". And in that, a certain distinction (or a group of distinctions) is used to define your own group and/or the Other. Race is one of them, sure. So is accent, taste in art, clothing, religion, culture in general, etc.

Certainly, yes.

Jandau:
As a result, when I watched the trailer I was annoyed and confused on an instinctive level (please note the word "instinctive"; rationally I understand the whole thing, I'm just talking about my gut response) - there was a person calling out everyone who's white on some shit, and I'm like "Hey, I'm white, what did I ever do to you?".

The thing here is, the process of constructing the aforementioned Other kicks in here - this girl, through her generalized hostility which I find unprovoked set herself as the Other, and I unconsciously start seeking to construct a framework for her, resulting in a racial bias where there might have been none.

Granted, that's likely one of the points of the movie - to show how needlessly confrontational behavior in racial relations can make a problem worse...

Ah, drifting into the tone argument there, which is a big can of worms. Who decides what is needlessly confrontational?

Should victims of discrimination play nice to avoid upsetting people? What's the point if they are doing that?

Now, it's certainly not fun being called out, whether or not it's deserved, but to respond with racism to someone angry at racism, or to say they were wrong to do so in the first place, that's not leading to a good place.

thaluikhain:
Ah, drifting into the tone argument there, which is a big can of worms. Who decides what is needlessly confrontational?

Should victims of discrimination play nice to avoid upsetting people? What's the point if they are doing that?

Now, it's certainly not fun being called out, whether or not it's deserved, but to respond with racism to someone angry at racism, or to say they were wrong to do so in the first place, that's not leading to a good place.

I wasn't trying to say anything about right and wrong, just about a general process and how it triggers. I don't want to get into a big debate. Also, just a personal opinion, but racial relations (not just in the US) often seem to me to be fixing the problem by perpetuating it (from either side)...

I... really, really don't know how to feel about this trailer.

I sincerely hope this movie turns out to present complex characters from a broad range of backgrounds and viewpoints, who don't always start off understanding each-other but can if broad-minded people try hard without malice, and that even if there are out and out villains (such as the 'racism is over' guy and 'hardest thing to be white and educated' guy) who has truly bigoted and moronic views, are represented as speaking only for themselves.

I hope that this is what this movie is, because I don't want to go to a theatre and get told that I'm a bad guy for being white and listening to hip-hop without a 100% appreciation of its background; or even worse, that the black guy in the seat next to me be told he's a bad guy for acting 'too white' because he's not always spoiling for a race war.

Oh, and another thing... A movie about racism in the 21st Century shows no hispanic people in the trailer? Hmmm...

Haha, that was not what I was expecting. Felt like I was watching the The Jeselnik Offensive.

I really, really, REALLY hope this plays out ok. I really don't wanna be here for the nuclear fallout on the forums if this thing goes south. And with a movie like this there's a LOT of ways this can fail, all of them likely.

This looks like absolute trash.

Why can't Americans leave the race-thing alone already?

softclocks:
This looks like absolute trash.

Why can't Americans leave the race-thing alone already?

The shock headlines sell the best, mostly.

Jandau:
Snip

I see where you're coming from. I see a lot of non-Americans express confusion at the heavy emphasis on race here in America, and I have to say it is pretty baffling. The whole thing's rooted in history, really. Race, as most Americans know it, didn't get all that much attention for a very long time in human history. Most conflicts were, and still are, cultural-based rather than racial. There's still a tone of "You're different from me, and thus inferior" to both sets of ideals.

But anyway, the heavy emphasis of race really started to emerge during colonial times, in colonial countries like Spain and Britain. And really, it was originally a cultural conflict in and of itself - the Spanish wanted to bring God to the Incas, the British wanted to civilize the Native American "savages." They didn't focus so much on their race, but that these people had a culture that was different - and to the colonials, that made them inferior. However, since said cultures were mostly confined to different races - white people had European culture, Incas had Incan culture, so on and so forth - the lines between "culture" and "race" became sort of blurry between generations. Those cultures started to interact and merge and people of both races would be born into what was effectively the same culture. But they'd still remember and be taught they're parents' prejudices against the other race, and since it was now a person's skintone that was more "other" than anything else about them... well, that's what people latched onto.

So... it's kinda like the reasons behind racism (If you could even call them reasons in the first place) have been lost, but people still kept that prejudice because, well, that's the way things are. They don't question it anymore. Even though the cultures that originally caused the conflict are long-gone or warped beyond recognition... And really, cultural conflicts aren't unheard of, either. I had a friend once who's dad would tell stories about how he immigrated from Ireland and had to put up with a lot of shit for that, despite being white as can be.

And yeah, it's a bit self-perpetuating, how people tired of being put in boxes respond by... putting other people in boxes. It's a big problem I have with American activists. They seem unable to comprehend that other parts of the world do things differently - that by dragging their baggage out of the country, they might be doing more harm than good, and spreading the very attitude they want to combat. After all, America's screwed-up history with race and racism has got nothing to do with you or Croatia. You don't even possibly benefit from it, as a white Non-American who recently moved to America might. But you might get blamed for it all the same, because in America people see things along a racial axis rather than a cultural one. A by-product of being a cultural melting pot, I guess.

But anyway... that's my take on it. Sorry for the long post.

Jandau:

thaluikhain:

Jandau:
Don't get me wrong, there are people of other races around, but I don't have a frame of reference to see them as anything other than slightly different colored people. As in, people like everyone else, only different hue, like someone wearing exotic clothing or having an unusual hairstyle. I just never came to associate skin color as an important differentiating factor.

As a result, the whole racial relation thing you've got going in the USA just seems weird to me. Like, what the hell levels of weird...

Problem is, lots of people believe that of themselves, without it being true. Very often, when someone say "I don't see race", it's more true to say "I don't see racism". If they don't recognise they see races in different ways, they aren't able to do anything about it.

Out of interest, what nation are you from?

You misunderstand. I do see race. Hell, I notice it on the street every day. I just don't get what the big deal is about it. Some people look unusual to me? Hell, a lot of WHITE people look unusual to me.

Also, I was trying to point out how odd the American race relation paradigm looks to someone who isn't immersed into it.

As to where I'm from, I'm from Croatia.

What is to get? Take race and replace it with whatever group you feel justified in hating. Jews, women, black people, gays, it's all interchangeable when it comes to understanding. Also Croatia has fascism problems, remember the Ustaše concerts and popularity? So I mean, why do they do what they do, most Americans wouldn't "get" fascism. (Croatia is a pretty chill place though, I used to vacation there in college)

Jandau:
The thing is, racial distinctions are simply a manifestation of a broader social mechanism, which is the construction of the Other, the "Us versus Them".

HA! Excellent observation, I've been saying this for years! Marx thought he was so clever about "class warfare", but he ignores the Indidual's irreducible role in the primal social struggle, which is satisfying your own ego. Life is a competetion and for any creature to survive in life, it must recognize its friends and its enemies. People are programmed to find their friends and attack their enemies. People are also emotional, butthurt crybabies ever resisting (and usually failing) the temptation to claim the world is conspiring against them when things get hard. So to not feel alone we find our tribes and whine about how the other tribes have it in for us. The Christians, the Jews, the Muslims, Conservatives, Communists, White, Black, Men, Women, and those two other tribes that really are getting whipped in America to some extent right now, are all eagerly waiting for the other tribe to lash them so they can whine about how persecuted--and correct about being persecuted--they are.

NinjaDeathSlap:
I... really, really don't know how to feel about this trailer.

I sincerely hope this movie turns out to present complex characters from a broad range of backgrounds and viewpoints, who don't always start off understanding each-other but can if broad-minded people try hard without malice, and that even if there are out and out villains (such as the 'racism is over' guy and 'hardest thing to be white and educated' guy) who has truly bigoted and moronic views, are represented as speaking only for themselves.

I hope that this is what this movie is, because I don't want to go to a theatre and get told that I'm a bad guy for being white and listening to hip-hop without a 100% appreciation of its background; or even worse, that the black guy in the seat next to me be told he's a bad guy for acting 'too white' because he's not always spoiling for a race war.

Oh, and another thing... A movie about racism in the 21st Century shows no hispanic people in the trailer? Hmmm...

Uhh, watch again, there are hispanic students in the background. IF trolling, there are ZERO gay Eskimos of color in it.

I can't wait to have all the angry white people tell me how horrible it is.

softclocks:
This looks like absolute trash.

Why can't Americans leave the race-thing alone already?

Because the 'race-thing' is still very much a thing that negatively impacts millions of people around the US on multiple levels every day. Historically, it's been insanely challenging to talk about in any constructive manner because people love hyperbole and taking *every statement* to ridiculous extremes (note: every statement, not to imply you can't take some things to ridiculous extremes to make a point, but it becomes less than productive when everything is taken to that point).

Prejudice in all it's forms is an insidious thing -- it weasels in unexpectedly and seemingly innocuous ways.

Fenrox Jackson:

NinjaDeathSlap:

Oh, and another thing... A movie about racism in the 21st Century shows no hispanic people in the trailer? Hmmm...

Uhh, watch again, there are hispanic students in the background. IF trolling, there are ZERO gay Eskimos of color in it.

Trolling or not, try being a Native American, the only recent "big" movie with us being fairly well represented was Twilight and Taylor isn't even remotely Native American(despite what they advertised.)

I'm not big on movies. I'm not big on movies that try and make a point or social commentary, so I'll likely pass on this one.

Serrenitei:

softclocks:
This looks like absolute trash.

Why can't Americans leave the race-thing alone already?

Because the 'race-thing' is still very much a thing that negatively impacts millions of people around the US on multiple levels every day.

Sure, and it impacts every race negatively too.

I wonder how a "Dear Black People" movie would go over? I'm sure it's only a matter of time before we see a Bollywood adaptation named "Dear Red People".

If the movie is good satire, I'll probably like it. I liked Everybody Hates Chris and that was basically similarly themed. But at least that was a movie about someone's experience during that time period rather than a potential "white people are evil conspirators". Though I guess I should ask what time period this was in?

Fenrox Jackson:
snip

I can't claim to have seen them, even after taking you advice and watching for a second time. Still, you may be right, and if so that was my bad. However, I don't see how the most discriminated against and disadvantaged racial group in modern day America being left 'in the background' is actually being any better. I certainly didn't see any hispanic (or asian) people, who looked like they might be named characters.

What this trailer certainly does do, is appear to present a lot of different viewpoints coming from both sides. That's good, but it could also turn into something quite ugly depending on what side (if any) the authorial voice of the film falls on, and in what fashion. It's tricky to separate the opinions of characters from the opinions of people writing them sometimes, as all characters have to, to some extent, see the world through the eyes of their creators, but that doesn't necessarily mean said author will agree with everything they say and do. Far from it, in fact.

Anyway, I suppose what I'm rambling towards is, one example from the trailer that kind of made me grimace a bit is the "Black people can't be racist." line, because God-damn am I sick and fucking tired of hearing people hide behind that mantra in order to make hateful and ignorant generalisations about The Other Side (the same applies to 'women can't be sexist'). I don't give a damn who you think can't be 'racist'. You can argue over the semantics of certain words all you like, but it won't change that that's all they are. 'Racist' or not, discrimination is discrimination, hate is hate, and untrue, harmful stereotypes are untrue, harmful stereotypes. If you're a black person lambasting 'White People' for 'having one black friend who sells you weed and listening to Jay-Z', then you may not be 'racist', but you are an arsehole.

So yeah, if that line is presented in terms of 'This girl needs to get over herself a little bit, no matter how many otherwise valid points she may have.' then I don't have a problem. If it's presented as 'Isn't this girl great for knowing how to spin her bullshit to claim she's not being just as bad as everyone else?' then I do. Time will tell which is which I guess. If nothing else, this movie has my attention.

EDIT: Also, I went back and checked a third time, paying special close attention to the (largely blurry) background characters...

I saw one Asian girl. That was it. Every other face was either distinctly Black or White.

There are only 2 predictions I have for this movie:

1. It will not be controversial.
2. White people will not find it threatening.

Think I may actually watch this, on the chance that it may be somewhat smart.

Lightknight:

Sure, and it impacts every race negatively too.

I wonder how a "Dear Black People" movie would go over?

it would go over really shitty...because in the real world these things do not exist in a vacuum

If the movie is good satire, I'll probably like it. I liked Everybody Hates Chris and that was basically similarly themed. But at least that was a movie about someone's experience during that time period rather than a potential "white people are evil conspirators". Though I guess I should ask what time period this was in?

I mean we couldn't just say "oh look its a movie examining racism in the present day from (what seems to be) a black perspective" noooooo we had to just make sure everyone knew thats its totally hard on whites TOO guys we gotta jump in and even the playing field every single time just so no one feels uncomfortable

I know....I sound a little to "angry SJW"

but I get it its uncomfortable, we dont like being addressed as a whole like that, we dont like to feelwe are being judged because of our race and we DEFINETLY don't like being "cast" as the "bad guy" in a lot of situations, like whatever we do were gonna be somehow racist, enjoy black culture things? youre fake! or your doing cultural appropriation! get all chummy with the idea of black peoples rights? youre fake and or some clueless white person trying to be "cool" you ain't part of our club and you never will be...no matter how progressive, you laugh at those jokes because they are funny but it still strikes at the primal level, you don't belong because of who and what you are that hurts

but

I don't understand why people feel the need to combat that via the same old "but but we got it hard too!" rhetoric it just isn't going to work, because most of the time it just isn't the same or it just isn't relevant

NinjaDeathSlap:
[
So yeah, if that line is presented in terms of 'This girl needs to get over herself a little bit, no matter how many otherwise valid points she may have.' then I don't have a problem. If it's presented as 'Isn't this girl great for knowing how to spin her bullshit to claim she's not being just as bad as everyone else?' .

erm..I thourght it was pretty obvious thats how it was presented...(the former)

Objectable:
I can't wait to have all the angry white people tell me how horrible it is.

lots of white people feeling uncomfortable

I think the move/trailer has done its purpose...

I came to this article with the attitude of "meh" yet, after watching the trailer my interest has been piqued. Looking forward to its opening night.

Jandau:
*snip*

One of the reasons why race plays such a huge part in society in the United States that it doesn't elsewhere in the world is because the United States is the biggest racial melting pot in the world. We have a large swath of land originally settled by native americans, then a bunch of white anglo-saxons with their black african slaves to kill all the native americans, and then to expand the country and build up its infrastructure, the government, made by white anglo-saxons for white anglo-saxons, steals a ton of land from latinos and have a bunch of chinese immigrants come over so they can work themselves to death creating the railroad infrastructure. Then later on, we have a bunch of immigrants from Europe that aren't anglo-saxon or protestants, like Italy, Greece, and Germany, plus a bunch of other immigrants from places like Korea, Japan, and the Philippines. As throughout the history of the United States, every new major immigration to the country faces a severe, racially-charged backlash, as if there's some sort of specific characteristic to this new group that prevents them from being assimilated into american culture, unlike every previous immigrant group that never had such problems, because, as Jim Sterling puts it, reasons. Then there's racial segregation, which took massive federal intervention to get rid of, let alone other forms of institutional racism like how interracial marriage was legal even after segregation was abolished. There's also events like the Japanese-American internment, which certainly stick out like a sore thumb to anybody viewing the United States' history of immigration, because its, more or less, the only way that was unequivocably unconstitutional and affected so many people on such a grand scale - there were even reparations for it later on.

So yeah, race is a huge deal in the United States, moreso than most other nations (not all, its a huge deal in many African nations, like Sudan or South Africa, for example), because of the fact that it is a nation of immigrants from just about every corner of the globe. Because the pool of immigrants is so varying, it makes it quite easy to ball up racism and xenophobia into one thing.

Vault101:

Objectable:
I can't wait to have all the angry white people tell me how horrible it is.

lots of white people feeling uncomfortable

I think the move/trailer has done its purpose...

So the movie is literally the racial equivalent of trolling. Wonderful.

Vault101:

but I get it its uncomfortable, we dont like being addressed as a whole like that, we dont like to feelwe are being judged because of our race and we DEFINETLY don't like being "cast" as the "bad guy" in a lot of situations, like whatever we do were gonna be somehow racist, enjoy black culture things? youre fake! or your doing cultural appropriation! get all chummy with the idea of black peoples rights? youre fake and or some clueless white person trying to be "cool" you ain't part of our club and you never will be...no matter how progressive, you laugh at those jokes because they are funny but it still strikes at the primal level, you don't belong because of who and what you are that hurts

Also I'll be totally honest here, Vaulty. This is one of the most thoroughly confusing paragraphs I have ever read.
Are you saying all white people feel uncomfortable be the idea of equality? Are you saying some do? Are you saying they should or shouldn't? Is it that one culture trying to emulate another culture because it seems cool is wrong and impossible? And what's that thing about jokes? If a white person laughs at a joke about white people, they're secretly feeling bad about it? What?

OT:
I'll be honest here; I'm not entirely sure what some of those scenes is satirizing.

The thing about Gremlins feels like it could easily be actually criticizing the movie or it could be to show how nonsensical and silly racial criticisms can be. Similarly, the bit where the crowd is yelling at the movie attendant seemed really odd. The guy just sells tickets. Yelling at him isn't going to do any more good than yelling at a Starbucks employee that caffeine should be banned.

Also the whole thing about "Dear White People" seems odd to me. So Fox News does something wrong and horrible and that means doing exactly the same thing in reverse is the right and appropriate thing to do.

Still, this looks much better than a lot of other attempts to look at these issues. Mostly because it actually looks pretty damn funny and the issues seem to be looked at as complex and not black and white, pardon the pun. If the humor is really as quality as it looked, I'll give it a watch.

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