Far Cry 4 "Quest for Everest" Takes You to Mt Everest

Far Cry 4 "Quest for Everest" Takes You to Mt Everest

"How do you want to play Far Cry 4? From the comfort of your home? Or from the highest mountain in the world?"

Far Cry 4 takes place in the Himalayas, in a fictional region named Kyrat and as part of the game's promotional campaign, Ubisoft is sending one lucky gamer to Mount Everest. To enter, Far Cry fans submit a video showing that they are the biggest Far Cry fan and explaining why they would like to go on the trek. Submissions remain open through August 15th.

The prize includes training, equipment, and the two week trip to and from the Mount Everest base camp, where the winner will get to play Far Cry 4. On Mount Everest. In the Himalayas. In some of the most extreme conditions in the world. The winner will be announced at PAX Prime, at the end of August.

Making the journey to one of the most exotic and difficult to reach locations in the world to play a video game may seem a little foolish, but it's still a trip to Mount Everest. There are plenty of rules associated with the video, such as the entrant can be the only person in the 2-minute-max video and "must not contain criminal or tortious activity." So, you can't recreate some of the more interesting scenes of Vaas from Far Cry 3 (at least three of you were thinking it).

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I've got a great idea:

Let's take people to one of the most awe-inspiring places on Earth, a place that changes people's lives just for the majesty of seeing it. A place where expert mountain climbers spend years in preparation to have a real-life adventure that changes them forever (and could easily kill them).

But then let's not have that adventure because that's hard and could be dangerous for your average schlub to attempt. Instead, let's go to that awe-inspiring place and instead of drinking in the wonder of our world, let's instead focus on a tiny LCD screen. Instead of interacting with that amazing locale, let's instead engage with a manufactured, pre-packaged game experience that kinda sorta lets you imagine you're having an adventure without any risk that you could be harmed, grow, or change in any way.

DANGER- MUST SILENCE:
I've got a great idea:

Let's take people to one of the most awe-inspiring places on Earth, a place that changes people's lives just for the majesty of seeing it. A place where expert mountain climbers spend years in preparation to have a real-life adventure that changes them forever (and could easily kill them).

But then let's not have that adventure because that's hard and could be dangerous for your average schlub to attempt. Instead, let's go to that awe-inspiring place and instead of drinking in the wonder of our world, let's instead focus on a tiny LCD screen. Instead of interacting with that amazing locale, let's instead engage with a manufactured, pre-packaged game experience that kinda sorta lets you imagine you're having an adventure without any risk that you could be harmed, grow, or change in any way.

They can't climb Everest this year as you need a permit to do so and they haven't allowed any climbing since April as the Sherpas went on strike after 16 were killed in an avalanche.

"Quest for Everest" Takes You to Mt Everest

Well that's a relief. I was worried the 'Quest for Everest' would take me to Mt Fuji.

lawrencein:

DANGER- MUST SILENCE:
I've got a great idea:

Let's take people to one of the most awe-inspiring places on Earth, a place that changes people's lives just for the majesty of seeing it. A place where expert mountain climbers spend years in preparation to have a real-life adventure that changes them forever (and could easily kill them).

But then let's not have that adventure because that's hard and could be dangerous for your average schlub to attempt. Instead, let's go to that awe-inspiring place and instead of drinking in the wonder of our world, let's instead focus on a tiny LCD screen. Instead of interacting with that amazing locale, let's instead engage with a manufactured, pre-packaged game experience that kinda sorta lets you imagine you're having an adventure without any risk that you could be harmed, grow, or change in any way.

They can't climb Everest this year as you need a permit to do so and they haven't allowed any climbing since April as the Sherpas went on strike after 16 were killed in an avalanche.

Well, yeah. They also can't climb it because it would be an insurance nightmare to just grab a random person off the Internet and expect them to climb the highest mountain in the world with just a couple weeks of training. I'm not complaining that they're not climbing the mountain. I'm complaining that the hook of this advertising campaign is "play a video game in a place it's a ridiculous waste of resources to play a video game."

I really like video games, but this kind of thing drives me up the wall. We've finally got a medium that allows storytelling and education in a way that directly engages with our minds, and instead of using that medium to be better people we've got an ad campaign using it to perform stunt disengagement from the world.

DANGER- MUST SILENCE:

lawrencein:

DANGER- MUST SILENCE:
I've got a great idea:

Let's take people to one of the most awe-inspiring places on Earth, a place that changes people's lives just for the majesty of seeing it. A place where expert mountain climbers spend years in preparation to have a real-life adventure that changes them forever (and could easily kill them).

But then let's not have that adventure because that's hard and could be dangerous for your average schlub to attempt. Instead, let's go to that awe-inspiring place and instead of drinking in the wonder of our world, let's instead focus on a tiny LCD screen. Instead of interacting with that amazing locale, let's instead engage with a manufactured, pre-packaged game experience that kinda sorta lets you imagine you're having an adventure without any risk that you could be harmed, grow, or change in any way.

They can't climb Everest this year as you need a permit to do so and they haven't allowed any climbing since April as the Sherpas went on strike after 16 were killed in an avalanche.

Well, yeah. They also can't climb it because it would be an insurance nightmare to just grab a random person off the Internet and expect them to climb the highest mountain in the world with just a couple weeks of training. I'm not complaining that they're not climbing the mountain. I'm complaining that the hook of this advertising campaign is "play a video game in a place it's a ridiculous waste of resources to play a video game."

I really like video games, but this kind of thing drives me up the wall. We've finally got a medium that allows storytelling and education in a way that directly engages with our minds, and instead of using that medium to be better people we've got an ad campaign using it to perform stunt disengagement from the world.

Couldn't agree more, especially with your original point. Everest has turned into a tourist shit hole. This only solidifies how little respect people have for the mountain and the Sherpas who risk their lives to carry rich pieces of shit up the mountain. Ubisoft is quickly becoming the new EA

 

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