Here's the Classes and Specializations in the D&D Player's Handbook

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Here's the Classes and Specializations in the D&D Player's Handbook

players handbook cover

Everything you can be in the new D&D.

With the release of the 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons Player's Handbook a little more than a week away in select stores, Wizards of the Coast released a bit of information about the various classes and their specialties. We weren't quite satisfied, and gathered some more information from an anonymous source involved in late stage playtesting of the new edition. After running the information by Wizards of the Coast to ensure that it's accurate to the new book, we've got a bit more information to share about the specializations and their abilities. These are the classes and their specializations, along with descriptions of some of the abilities that each gets.

Barbarian
Very much the D&D Barbarian of older editions, whose key power is the ability to go into rages. Their specializations are called Paths.

  • The Path of the Berserker gains powers to make their rages more potent, as well as powers to terrify and dismay their enemies.
  • The Path of the Totem Warrior gains powers based on a spirit animal, like a Bear, Eagle, or Wolf

Bard
A potent spellcaster - peaking with 9th level spells - with the ability to give comrades inspiration dice and hold their own in light combat. Their specializations are called Colleges.

  • The College of Lore is the traditional D&D Bard, with lots of skills and versatile magical talents.
  • The College of Valor is a warrior bard, with heavier armor and abilities that boost both their melee combat and ability to cast spells while making attacks.

Cleric
Pretty much the cleric you know and love - almost all of their unique features come from choice of their deity's divine domain.

  • The Knowledge domain conveys more powerful spellcasting and an abundance of information gathering powers.
  • The Life domain was already revealed in the basic rules, and gives potent healing powers.
  • The Light domain conveys lots of (literal) firepower and defensive abilities that blind opponents.
  • The Nature domain gives natural world controlling spells, protection from the elements, and friendship with the beasts of the wild.
  • The Tempest is the storm gods: Lightning, Winds, Flying, Heavy Armor - you're basically Thor's backup singer.
  • The Trickery domain conveys the ability to improve others' sneaking abilities, become invisible, and invoke illusions.
  • The War domain gives Heavy Armor, spells for melee combat, some extra attacks, and resistance to battle damage.

Druid
Powerful spellcasters with the ability to turn from their natural form into that of particular wild beasts. Their specializations come from what Circle of Druids they learned in.

  • The Circle of the Land gains extra spells and abilities based on their home terrain type, like Mountain, Coast, or Arctic.
  • The Circle of the Moon gains enhanced abilities to transform into a wider variety of beasts and creatures, as well as the ability to fight harder and longer while in beast form.

Fighter
The guy who is really good at taking a sharp thing and putting it in people you don't like. Their specializations are called Martial Archetypes.

  • The Champion is the warrior's warrior, already in the basic rules.
  • The Battle Master is the more complex fighter, using a pool of "superiority dice" spent to fuel abilities like feinting attacks and rallying their allies.
  • The Eldritch Knight is a spellsword who gains access to a pool of up to 4th level wizard spells and the ability to fight while simultaneously wielding magic.

Monk
An armored martial artist who can fight with bare fists or weapons, and gains a pool of Ki points to fuel various supernatural abilities. Slowly gains the whole suite of 3.0 Era monk powers like immunity to disease, agelessness, and stunning strikes. Their specializations are called Monastic Traditions.

  • The Way of the Open Hand teaches powers that emphasize unarmed combat.
  • The Way of Shadow teaches powers that give the monk sneaking and magical powers while in darkness - like teleportation.
  • The Way of the Four Elements teaches users to harness their Ki to cast a variety of elemental abilities and spells - from Burning Hands to Stoneskin.

Paladin
A warrior with innate healing abilities - the classic Lay on Hands - and limited spellcasting up to 5th level. Their specializations outline their unique code of required behavior and their missions in life.

  • The Oath of Devotion is the classic paladin, with the ability to turn undead and channel radiant power.
  • The Oath of the Ancients is a paladin devoted to the natural order of the world, called horned knights and often elves. Particularly powerful against evil magic.
  • The Oath of Vengeance is for paladins who fight their sworn foes, whose powers slow them down and ensure they're brought to justice at any cost.

Ranger
Powerful warriors who roam the wilds beyond civilization and keep their friends safe while travelling, they gain some spellcasting abilities like the Paladin and bonuses against types of favored enemies. Their specializations are called Ranger Archetypes.

  • The Hunter gains a variety of abilities that make them more powerful in combat against not just their favored enemies, but a variety of foes like them.
  • The Beast Master has an animal friend who fights alongside them and acts when they command it to.

Rogue
Consummate tricksters, with abilities that make them hard to catch in addition to their classic sneak attack. Their specializations are Roguish Archetypes.

  • The Thief was already unveiled in the Basic Rules, their powers focus on getting where you want to go.
  • The Assassin has a suite of abilities based around impersonating, infiltrating, and murdering.
  • The Arcane Trickster gains limited spellcasting abilities, up to 4th level wizard spells, and the ability to steal from others using their Mage Hand cantrip. Can eventually steal spells from the minds of other casters.
Mordenkainens Sword

Sorcerer
Channels the natural magic of their person into spellcasting prowess. They use a pool of sorcery points to twist their spells through a process called metamagic. Their specializations are called Sorcerous Origins.

  • A Draconic Bloodline Sorcerer gains breath weapons, wings, scales - the whole nine yards.
  • A Wild Magic Sorcerer has potent surges of power in exchange for the chance to roll on a table of random effects - not all of which are things you'd like to happen.

Warlock
A spellcaster who has a deal with a powerful supernatural creature for their might, they use a unique spellcasting system based on a limited number of spells known combined with a maximum power level of spells available.

  • A pact with The Archfey grants powers based on beguiling and tricking opponents.
  • A pact with The Fiend grants powers based on hellish luck and dark blessings.
  • A pact with The Great Old One grants powers based on madness, the mind, and the great beyond.

Wizard
The consummate studier of magic, the wizard has a greater variety of magics available to them than anyone else. Their specializations are called Arcane Traditions and all gain boosts to spells categorized into their schools.

  • Abjuration Wizards are the masters of spells that protect, ward, and banish. They gain innate protection from attacks.
  • Conjuration Wizards are the masters of spells that create and summon, they also sideline in teleportation.
  • Divination Wizards focus on seeing the future and the hidden, they can glimpse the future to affect and alter die rolls.
  • Enchantment Wizards focus on beguiling and dominating their foes, enchanters can even reactively convince foes not to attack them.
  • Evocation Wizards are already in the basic rules - the master of destructive magics.
  • Illusion Wizards are creators of tricks and falsehoods, who can produce illusory doubles and twist their illusions already cast.
  • Necromancy Wizards gain power from the souls of those killed by their magic and command and create the undead.
  • Transmutation Wizards have spells that modify the world around them, allowing them to change shapes and use alchemy to change the world - even create a philosopher's stone!

Permalink

Fun fact, I think Barbarians are the only class that doesn't have the option to cast spells at some level. (Even this is not strictly speaking true since Totem Warrior can cast a couple spells as rituals.)

I like it, but I want to learn more about the customization beyond just a specialization. Is it in feats or character traits? I really want to read this book haha

I really wanted to go from Battle ranger archer to Beastmaster with two scimitars (yup, a panther)...
But now I know Necromancer is available too... that's just plain tempting!!! :D

funksobeefy:
I like it, but I want to learn more about the customization beyond just a specialization. Is it in feats or character traits? I really want to read this book haha

There's 3 main ways to customize your character:

1) Race
2) Class
3) Background

In addition to those there are feats as well as the specializations listed above. It's worth noting that there are far less feats in this system and they are far more character defining.

All in all it's done a fairly good job combining flexibility with the traditional level / class system. If you're used to classless or leveless systems, though, you might not feel satisfied with the options presented as you're still essentially only making modifications to generic fantasy tropes. As far as D&D goes, though, I'd say it seems to offer more of a personal touch than previous editions did.

funksobeefy:
I like it, but I want to learn more about the customization beyond just a specialization. Is it in feats or character traits? I really want to read this book haha

Basically, everything the good sir who already quoted said is very true. I just wished to add that there are feats, but not as many of them, and you have to choose whether to take a feat or upgrade ability scores. This seems to be more or less balanced by the increase in power that feats have. It is generally not just say increasing your initiative roll, it is that you are never surprised so you won't have disadvantage on ambushes AND +5 to initiative rolls. Random example I know (Alert is the feat I was trying to remember) but many feats also increase an ability score as well, you can trade off a bit with that. All around they are meant to make the feats a little more character defining as well. Anyway, I for one can't wait to roll a Monk (yay no more medium attack bonus from 3!), or a Cthulu warlock because...come on. How does that not sound entertaining.

TBH, every class here looks fun. Too fun. I can't play all of them after all. Barbarians haven't changed much, but that's a good thing, bards can cast 9th levels spells and have a combat buff focused build, which sounds awesome, Clerics are still Clerics, Druids are still Druids, Fighters... are probably the one class I still can't bring myself to care about (though arcane fighter looks neat), Monks can be the fucking Avatar, Paladins remain the best class by default, Rangers are basically the same, Rogues now have their neatest prestige classes turned into specializations, Sorcerers might be more than a worse Wizard, Warlocks are as flavorful as ever, and Wizards are still old boring beardy dudes. So I guess it isn't just fighters I don't like.

I know that the game will inevitably be a massive unbalanced mess, but it looks like it could be a fun one, and that's what really matters. And what I've seen of the new feat system looks great.

i want my shaman, damn it.

Only 2 variations on the Sorcerer? Not too impressed by that, but i am liking that other classes are getting these sort of specializations.

Looks like a lot of prestige classes and multiclassing are being rolled together into the core classes...not sure how I feel about that, but I am not thrilled that the only two ways to play sorcerer are 'wild mage' and 'dragon disciple'....not sure all this forced specialization thing is up my alley....3.5 had a bit more flexibility is my impression from this.

spartandude:
Only 2 variations on the Sorcerer? Not too impressed by that, but i am liking that other classes are getting these sort of specializations.

I'm assuming they're going to expand the Sorcerer, Barbarian, and Bard at the very least in the Martial/Arcane/Divine Power equivalent books, because two choices apiece is definitely not the breadth of what the class can be (especially if they've loosened restrictions enough that Spellsword is a basic variant of Fighter). They came up with a few interesting sorcerer variants in 4E (one that stands out was the star-aligned sorcerer, whose power waxed, waned, and changed with the constellations).

They ran into some problems by breaking Wizards back into 8 subclasses, which is a lot of (in my mind) unnecessary bloat. If I understand the rules correctly, picking one specialization won't close off other schools, which is nice, but I'm looking forward to the spell list and seeing how much the choice matters. They put themselves in the difficult situation of trying to bring back all the old wizard schools and giving fewer options to other classes, combining a few similar schools (my preferred option, but one that would have undoubtedly made someone angry), and putting out some schools now alongside other class specializations and holding the rest for Arcane Power, which DEFINITELY would have caused trouble.

But my question is, can I play the famous Luchadore Grappler Monk? If so, sold.

Revnak:
TBH, every class here looks fun. Too fun. I can't play all of them after all. Barbarians haven't changed much, but that's a good thing, bards can cast 9th levels spells and have a combat buff focused build, which sounds awesome, Clerics are still Clerics, Druids are still Druids, Fighters... are probably the one class I still can't bring myself to care about (though arcane fighter looks neat), Monks can be the fucking Avatar, Paladins remain the best class by default, Rangers are basically the same, Rogues now have their neatest prestige classes turned into specializations, Sorcerers might be more than a worse Wizard, Warlocks are as flavorful as ever, and Wizards are still old boring beardy dudes. So I guess it isn't just fighters I don't like.

I know that the game will inevitably be a massive unbalanced mess, but it looks like it could be a fun one, and that's what really matters. And what I've seen of the new feat system looks great.

I agree the classes all look awesome... mostly. However, based on the basic rules we already have, the Cleric is terrible. The obvious downside of going back to Vancian spellcasting is that the Cleric is now back to being expected to cast most, if not all spells as healing spells. The weakening of healing spells, and the fact you don't get all your hit dice expended on healing back guarantees that the Cleric will be shot many the dirty look for casting anything other than heals. We actually haven't been able to play thus far because NONE of our six players is willing to play the Cleric. We tried playing without a Cleric using healing from hit dice and healing potions, and it just slowed the game down too much. If neither the Druid, the Bard, nor the Paladin is a viable healer (which from these descriptions, I'm guessing they're not) we'll either be HEAVILY house-ruling the Cleric or just playing an earlier edition.

WarpedLord:

Revnak:
TBH, every class here looks fun. Too fun. I can't play all of them after all. Barbarians haven't changed much, but that's a good thing, bards can cast 9th levels spells and have a combat buff focused build, which sounds awesome, Clerics are still Clerics, Druids are still Druids, Fighters... are probably the one class I still can't bring myself to care about (though arcane fighter looks neat), Monks can be the fucking Avatar, Paladins remain the best class by default, Rangers are basically the same, Rogues now have their neatest prestige classes turned into specializations, Sorcerers might be more than a worse Wizard, Warlocks are as flavorful as ever, and Wizards are still old boring beardy dudes. So I guess it isn't just fighters I don't like.

I know that the game will inevitably be a massive unbalanced mess, but it looks like it could be a fun one, and that's what really matters. And what I've seen of the new feat system looks great.

I agree the classes all look awesome... mostly. However, based on the basic rules we already have, the Cleric is terrible. The obvious downside of going back to Vancian spellcasting is that the Cleric is now back to being expected to cast most, if not all spells as healing spells. The weakening of healing spells, and the fact you don't get all your hit dice expended on healing back guarantees that the Cleric will be shot many the dirty look for casting anything other than heals. We actually haven't been able to play thus far because NONE of our six players is willing to play the Cleric. We tried playing without a Cleric using healing from hit dice and healing potions, and it just slowed the game down too much. If neither the Druid, the Bard, nor the Paladin is a viable healer (which from these descriptions, I'm guessing they're not) we'll either be HEAVILY house-ruling the Cleric or just playing an earlier edition.

When has Cleric's strength lied in healing? Cure has never been the most efficient way to heal. Whether or not it's worse now is irrelevant, Cleric has always been strong because they're a really bulky caster. They still cast as much as a wizard, and they still get armor (war getting heavy armor). They're still basically the same thing as ever. However, yeah, making the default specialization life was a bad move. They really need to get past the idea that clerics are supposed to all heal, especially when they keep not making it work that well or that reliably.

WarpedLord:

Revnak:
TBH, every class here looks fun. Too fun. I can't play all of them after all. Barbarians haven't changed much, but that's a good thing, bards can cast 9th levels spells and have a combat buff focused build, which sounds awesome, Clerics are still Clerics, Druids are still Druids, Fighters... are probably the one class I still can't bring myself to care about (though arcane fighter looks neat), Monks can be the fucking Avatar, Paladins remain the best class by default, Rangers are basically the same, Rogues now have their neatest prestige classes turned into specializations, Sorcerers might be more than a worse Wizard, Warlocks are as flavorful as ever, and Wizards are still old boring beardy dudes. So I guess it isn't just fighters I don't like.

I know that the game will inevitably be a massive unbalanced mess, but it looks like it could be a fun one, and that's what really matters. And what I've seen of the new feat system looks great.

I agree the classes all look awesome... mostly. However, based on the basic rules we already have, the Cleric is terrible. The obvious downside of going back to Vancian spellcasting is that the Cleric is now back to being expected to cast most, if not all spells as healing spells. The weakening of healing spells, and the fact you don't get all your hit dice expended on healing back guarantees that the Cleric will be shot many the dirty look for casting anything other than heals. We actually haven't been able to play thus far because NONE of our six players is willing to play the Cleric. We tried playing without a Cleric using healing from hit dice and healing potions, and it just slowed the game down too much. If neither the Druid, the Bard, nor the Paladin is a viable healer (which from these descriptions, I'm guessing they're not) we'll either be HEAVILY house-ruling the Cleric or just playing an earlier edition.

Just cast your healing spells at a higher level? I actually REALLY enjoy the heavily revamped vancian spellcasting. No more need to memorize 5x Magic Missile or anything.

Maybe the Life specialization IS the problem... It's definitely a possibility, since the basic Life Cleric is good at precisely NOTHING other than casting healing spells. They get no cool combat tricks, nothing interesting to do in combat at all other than cast the occasional cure spell.

WarpedLord:
Maybe the Life specialization IS the problem... It's definitely a possibility, since the basic Life Cleric is good at precisely NOTHING other than casting healing spells. They get no cool combat tricks, nothing interesting to do in combat at all other than cast the occasional cure spell.

Yeah, but I think that's been the problem with the life domain as long as it has been a thing, but the limit on number of spells has just made it a bit more obvious. Less spells means a focus on more passive spells makes you way more passive than you would have been with more.

Oroboros:
Looks like a lot of prestige classes and multiclassing are being rolled together into the core classes...not sure how I feel about that, but I am not thrilled that the only two ways to play sorcerer are 'wild mage' and 'dragon disciple'....not sure all this forced specialization thing is up my alley....3.5 had a bit more flexibility is my impression from this.

3.5 was flexibility incarnate.
Multiclassing was pretty OP, to the point where there were very few worthwhile pure core class builds outside of RP.

Atmos Duality:

Oroboros:
Looks like a lot of prestige classes and multiclassing are being rolled together into the core classes...not sure how I feel about that, but I am not thrilled that the only two ways to play sorcerer are 'wild mage' and 'dragon disciple'....not sure all this forced specialization thing is up my alley....3.5 had a bit more flexibility is my impression from this.

3.5 was flexibility incarnate.
Multiclassing was pretty OP, to the point where there were very few worthwhile pure core class builds outside of RP.

Yes...I have encountered problems with munchkins exploiting certain builds/classes feats etc in games I DM. But I do think the flexibility 3.5 brought to the table was incredibly valuable. D&D next seems (at least to me) to be encouraging players to follow a set of rather defined character types.

Soooo...
It's Pathfinder's Archetypes and other base class features/Prestige Classes?

Oroboros:

Yes...I have encountered problems with munchkins exploiting certain builds/classes feats etc in games I DM. But I do think the flexibility 3.5 brought to the table was incredibly valuable. D&D next seems (at least to me) to be encouraging players to follow a set of rather defined character types.

Aye, 3.5 became very munchkin-esque. It's probably why Pathfinder remains very popular to this day.
On the other hand, I think a lot of that bloat needed to be trimmed down without eliminating the more fun concepts.
(something that Pathfinder started out doing...and then it bloated out into absurdity anyway)

I didn't like 4th Edition at all, so my latest D&D experience was effectively 3.5 (and Pathfinder, which is essentially D&D 3.75).

From where I stand, a return to more class-centric character style is welcome, but without going to the depths of 2nd edition's iron clad class restrictions.

I wonder if necromancy will be categorically evil again. That always got on my tits.

JimB:
I wonder if necromancy will be categorically evil again. That always got on my tits.

It wasn't evil in 3.5. Not that I recall, at least.

kyosai7:

JimB:
I wonder if necromancy will be categorically evil again. That always got on my tits.

It wasn't evil in 3.5. Not that I recall, at least.

Divine necromancy virtually was. And I'm pretty certain the undead you summon were still technically of the evil subtype, regardless of your own alignment.

Necromancy isn't always all about animating the dead, sure it's a big known use of it however, sometimes you got great defensive spells and debuffs from it.

WarpedLord:
Maybe the Life specialization IS the problem... It's definitely a possibility, since the basic Life Cleric is good at precisely NOTHING other than casting healing spells. They get no cool combat tricks, nothing interesting to do in combat at all other than cast the occasional cure spell.

Man, poor Clerics. How will they every find anything fun to do between channel divinity, cantrip spells, having good hit point progression, decent weapon/armor proficiency, rituals and frankly a boat load of spell castings. Even a Healbot Cleric should have plenty of fun. Perhaps it's not a system for everyone - the best groups always find whatever system best suits them, but I'd put more burden on the player than the mechanics.

Slycne:

WarpedLord:
Maybe the Life specialization IS the problem... It's definitely a possibility, since the basic Life Cleric is good at precisely NOTHING other than casting healing spells. They get no cool combat tricks, nothing interesting to do in combat at all other than cast the occasional cure spell.

Man, poor Clerics. How will they every find anything fun to do between channel divinity, cantrip spells, having good hit point progression, decent weapon/armor proficiency, rituals and frankly a boat load of spell castings. Even a Healbot Cleric should have plenty of fun. Perhaps it's not a system for everyone - the best groups always find whatever system best suits them, but I'd put more burden on the player than the mechanics.

Er, if about half of those spells are expected to be heals (and all of the channel divinities), then I can kinda see why they might complain. Note, this is only related to Life Clerics. The Cleric class, as a concept, has always been ridiculously overpowered, but only when they aren't focused on healing, which is generally a near worthless endeavor.

Slycne:

WarpedLord:
Maybe the Life specialization IS the problem... It's definitely a possibility, since the basic Life Cleric is good at precisely NOTHING other than casting healing spells. They get no cool combat tricks, nothing interesting to do in combat at all other than cast the occasional cure spell.

Man, poor Clerics. How will they every find anything fun to do between channel divinity, cantrip spells, having good hit point progression, decent weapon/armor proficiency, rituals and frankly a boat load of spell castings. Even a Healbot Cleric should have plenty of fun. Perhaps it's not a system for everyone - the best groups always find whatever system best suits them, but I'd put more burden on the player than the mechanics.

Wow... way to open the basic rules and type out all the Cleric class features...

Let's look at all the awesome, fun stuff you kindly listed (again, only looking at the "healbot Cleric" we have full info on, but you said yourself they should have "plenty of fun")

Channel Divinity - so... healing. Um.... yay?
Cantrips - You HAVE to be joking here. While the Wizards get plenty of cool cantrips, Clerics get mostly out-of-combat stuff, with only really 3 cantrips useful in combat, with one only being useful if they let a party member hit 0 HP, one that's actually a decent attack spell (amazingly), and one that's a crappy buff that relies on Cocentration (more on THAT later)
Good HP Progression - Okay, sure... but how does this make Clerics "fun"?
Decent Weapon/Armor profiecency - Weapons? Yeah... enjoy those awesome simple weapons and the amazing ZERO manuevers Clerics can pull off with them. As for the armor... So they get okay armor... that's not going to help when most of the decent spells (that aren't heals, so granted, they'll never cast them anyway) all rely on concentration, which is AWFUL now, so the last thing you're going to want to do is cast one and then get into melee.
Rituals - Again... nothing to do with combat, which like it or not is a HUGE part of most campaigns... and Clerics being dreadfully boring and sucky in combat is what I was pointing out in the first place.
A "boatload" of spellcasting - Between the removal of stat-based bonus spells, and the fact that as Revnak mentioned... at LEAST half the cleric's spellcasting will be healing spells that are now far less effective than 3rd or 4th edition, playing a Cleric will hardly feel like you have a "boatload" of spells. More likely at mid-levels, they'll get 2 or 3 offensive castings per day, tops. Those other rounds, they can run up and swing at stuff with their mace while the fighters and rogues are dancing around the battlefield showing off all the fun new tricks they get.

[insert HEAVY, dripping sarcasm here] Wow... now that I look at it again, I've changed my mind. Clerics look like sooooo much fun! [yeah... like a tidal wave of sarcasm]

Now if only someone will make a PC CRPG out of it I will buy pre-order that bad boy. I'm sad that there's not really a way for me to enjoy the intricacies of this game. To the best of my knowledge, the last D&D video game was NWN2 way back in 2006. (I'm not including MMOs DDO or NW). It's way past due for a new, epic D&D CRPG.

Listening to all the cleric complaints. Man, if only there were other classes that could heal or buff. That would be sweet. Maybe there should be a few of them, like an entire archetype. Leader sounds like a good term for it. Maybe we could get a non-magical "Leader" even, like say...a Warlord. Man that could be AWESOME. A class focused around ally movement and buffs that also can attack enemies at the same time. Shame we don't have something like that.

Speaking of such things, nice to see they cribbed the Warlock verbatim from 4e.

It's good to finally see the Specializations for each class, mostly since this was apparently where the more complex (and you know maybe actually interesting) martial characters would finally show up. Unless superiority dice actually provide some cool mechanics, I don't really see anything I like. You've got herp derp melee basic attack Fighter or Wizard Fighter. Yep that's the way to fix everything, make everyone a Wizards WotC! Perfect balance there!

WarpedLord:
snip

Or you know, list the powers and mechanics my Healbot cleric is actually using. If a player is incapable of doing anything but stand around and cast Cure Wounds on the party that's an issue with the player not the mechanics. Personally, I'd rather work at using what the Cleric has than the 4E approach of simply reskinning an attack to be Holy Healing Smite. As mentioned, ultimately different strokes for different folks. There are plenty of systems that are have healers with a larger combat presence or subvert the need at all, that's just not D&D for me so I'm quite happy with the comfortable middle ground that 5E has found.

I wonder how these new rules will mesh with this little project I was working on?

Definitely liking the specializations for all the classes. Also...Warlock, eh? Let's just hope they don't go on an adventure where there are those who want to build a bridge out of them...

Slycne:

WarpedLord:
snip

Or you know, list the powers and mechanics my Healbot cleric is actually using. If a player is incapable of doing anything but stand around and cast Cure Wounds on the party that's an issue with the player not the mechanics. Personally, I'd rather work at using what the Cleric has than the 4E approach of simply reskinning an attack to be Holy Healing Smite. As mentioned, ultimately different strokes for different folks. There are plenty of systems that are have healers with a larger combat presence or subvert the need at all, that's just not D&D for me so I'm quite happy with the comfortable middle ground that 5E has found.

Okay, then why not answer me here, the guy who was comparing it to 3.5. I still think that the life cleric looks really boring, far more so than doing a similar build in 3.5 since at least then they had more casts and didn't have to increase the spell slot of cure to get more healing done with it. And they had way more spells so them ignoring their healing duties was easier. Oh, and they could get better weapons, since apparently they're stuck with simple this time around.

Other domains may look fun, but life cleric looks outright stupid.

Revnak:
Okay, then why not answer me here, the guy who was comparing it to 3.5. I still think that the life cleric looks really boring, far more so than doing a similar build in 3.5 since at least then they had more casts and didn't have to increase the spell slot of cure to get more healing done with it. And they had way more spells so them ignoring their healing duties was easier. Oh, and they could get better weapons, since apparently they're stuck with simple this time around.

Other domains may look fun, but life cleric looks outright stupid.

Heh. Well that's hardly fair, a properly specced Cleric in 3.5 was arguably the best class, hands down, outside of some truly broken stuff.

I'm actually kind of baffled at the backlash to the spell level casting system in 5E, I really love this implementation. Often in earlier editions you would be forced to blow a high level heal since a bunch of smaller ones wasn't going to cut it, so you'd usually be overhealing a lot. Now you get to tailor the amount of omph you want to put into it every time. If anything I think this mean Life Clerics will keep more of the high level spells for "fun" stuff. Likewise, I think the shrinking of the spell list has a lot to do with this method, no more need for Cure Moderate, Cure Serious, Critical, etc, which leaves the Cleric approximately as many other spells as they had before.

I would agree that life is likely the least interesting of the bunch, but I don't think that suddenly makes it completely unplayable or unfun to play is all I'm getting at.

Slycne:

Revnak:
Okay, then why not answer me here, the guy who was comparing it to 3.5. I still think that the life cleric looks really boring, far more so than doing a similar build in 3.5 since at least then they had more casts and didn't have to increase the spell slot of cure to get more healing done with it. And they had way more spells so them ignoring their healing duties was easier. Oh, and they could get better weapons, since apparently they're stuck with simple this time around.

Other domains may look fun, but life cleric looks outright stupid.

Heh. Well that's hardly fair, a properly specced Cleric in 3.5 was arguably the best class, hands down, outside of some truly broken stuff.

I'm actually kind of baffled at the backlash to the spell level casting system in 5E, I actually really love this implementation. Often in earlier editions you would be forced to blow a high level heal since a bunch of smaller ones wasn't going to cut it, so you'd usually be overhealing a lot. Now you get to tailor the amount of omph you want to put into it every time. If anything I think this mean Life Clerics will keep more of the high level spells for "fun" stuff. Likewise, I think the shrinking of the spell list has a lot to do with this method, no more need for Cure Moderate, Cure Serious, Critical, etc, which leaves the Cleric approximately as many other spells as they had before.

I would agree that life is likely the least interesting of the bunch, but I don't think that suddenly makes it completely unplayable or unfun to play is all I'm getting at.

I actually really like the system, I just think it sucks in regards to the healing spells since they used to get more dice with levels anyway, rather than taking up a higher spell slot (though that might just be Pathfinder). And I know the cleric was broken, that's why I never played it. However, the healbot cleric really wasn't, since they usually weren't doing things like getting summoning or combat feats, and I'm pretty certain the life domain was terrible. And this new healbot cleric is much worse than that one, to the point that it seems like an honestly boring class compared to the flavorful and fun martial classes or the other full casters (the latter of which apparently includes the fucking bard this time around, which I cannot imagine is a balanced class in this game).

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here