7 Magnificent Nebula Pictures from Hubble

7 Magnificent Nebula Pictures from Hubble

Our journey through the observed universe continues with seven Hubble Space Telescope pictures of magnificent nebulae.

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One more magnificent nebula picture to add:
image
It's like that creepy girl with daddy issues became a terminator isn't it?

Lovely stuff. Really enjoying this series of posts -- great idea. It's helped fuel my current cosmos image obsession (I finally weaned myself off paleo-art, phew! So least no one will think I'm a massive nerd now). You should consider doing a solar one. My current wallpaper of a blended CME photo of our own sun, is one of the most powerful (and sort of intimidating) images I've ever adorned my desktop with.

Some embedded links to hubble or the original photos would be pretty great though!

Remus:
One more magnificent nebula picture to add:
image
It's like that creepy girl with daddy issues became a terminator isn't it?

Thank you. I was a bit disappointed that she wasn't in the article, so this brightened my day.

I wasn't thrilled with the filtering on a few of them, they all would've looked better with the stars as bright dots without the sparkle effect.

JET1971:
I wasn't thrilled with the filtering on a few of them, they all would've looked better with the stars as bright dots without the sparkle effect.

You do realise it's not an effect, it's caused by the diffraction of light as it passes through the support struts of the secondary mirror. The number of lines coming off the stars indicates the number of support struts, usually 4.

I'm thinking every particle of those things is 10s to 1000s of light years apart. Makes me feel pretty small.

Yes, horsehead and cateye are impressive. They are also the most famous objects in the sky these days.

Alexander Kirby:

JET1971:
I wasn't thrilled with the filtering on a few of them, they all would've looked better with the stars as bright dots without the sparkle effect.

You do realise it's not an effect, it's caused by the diffraction of light as it passes through the support struts of the secondary mirror. The number of lines coming off the stars indicates the number of support struts, usually 4.

I'm certain he was just taking the piss.

UnderGlass:
Lovely stuff. Really enjoying this series of posts -- great idea. It's helped fuel my current cosmos image obsession (I finally weaned myself off paleo-art, phew! So least no one will think I'm a massive nerd now). You should consider doing a solar one. My current wallpaper of a blended CME photo of our own sun, is one of the most powerful (and sort of intimidating) images I've ever adorned my desktop with.

Some embedded links to hubble or the original photos would be pretty great though!

Glad you're enjoying them! You should check out our 10 space videos - many are solar!

 

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