Uber is Actively Trying to Sabotage Lyft, Ridesharing Competition

Uber is Actively Trying to Sabotage Lyft, Ridesharing Competition

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New report says Uber has ordered and cancelled thousands of Lyft rides, actively recruits Lyft drivers.

Uber and Lyft are both great ways to get around, sans-car or public transpo (especially for the bar-hopping crowd). But it now seems as though one is playing dirty pool with the other.

A new report by The Verge says that Uber is actively waging war against its rival, Lyft. The report includes a number of troubling assertions, from thousands of Lyft rides made -- and cancelled -- by Uber contractors, to "Brand Ambassadors" booking Lyft rides, only to use the ride as an Uber recruitment session.

Operation SLOG (Supplying Long-term Operations Growth) was supposed to be revealed by The Verge. When the editorial outlet asked for comment on the then-secret SLOG (and what an awful acronym that is), Uber reportedly stalled in order to publish a blog post of its own on the matter.

Much of SLOG appears to be standard recruitment fare -- driver incentives, recruitment campaigns -- but the "use a burner iPhone and Uber-supplied credit card" bit doesn't seem to be in the literature.

You can dive into full report from The Verge here. As an active Uber user, the new details are hard to swallow...but I'm not sure if I'll be ending my business with the company anytime soon.

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So, they're the moustache mobiles? I wondered, being not of the Uber or Lyfting persuasion. However, since those guys have done nothing to gain my attention as a potential customer, they can go kill each other's business and I won't care.

Devin Connors:
[...]

You can dive into full report from The Verge here. As an active Uber user, the new details are hard to swallow...but I'm not sure if I'll be ending my business with the company anytime soon.

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This is why, right here, the reason that there will be no change in business practices, and the reason why there will never be a change.

Pathetic.

Heard about Uber's shitty business practices on Harmontown months ago, figured being caught wouldn't have any impact on them.
Looks like I was right.

I don't know who these companies are or why their story is relevant, but given that one has a super name, like Uber, and the other is a made up word I can't pronounce, I know which side I would pick. Whoever the heck they are.

When your business cannot stand on it's merit alone, and when you are too greedy for short-term profits over long-term profits to compete effectively, THIS is what you resort to... and the author of this article is unashamed of his supporting this kind of crass behavior showing us who the REAL problem in todays markets really are... us.

Way to support the problem, Devin Connors. You might be proud of yourself, but I'm reviled. I'll remember your name around here so I don't bother clicking your articles. Integrity should not be for sale, and when it is, I know better than to have anything to do with it. Good job, Devin... good job.

Ajarat:
Way to support the problem, Devin Connors. You might be proud of yourself, but I'm reviled. I'll remember your name around here so I don't bother clicking your articles. Integrity should not be for sale, and when it is, I know better than to have anything to do with it. Good job, Devin... good job.

Well, I mean he does have "jerk" right there in his title.

But yeah, disappointing. We should not accept bad business practices from companies we support. For this sort of social service, WE are the only kind of accountability around. God knows the BBB isn't going to do anything about it.

I've been reading news about Uber and Lyft for well over a year now. They're novel concepts, but rub taxi services and public transport authorities the wrong way, for good reason. I wouldn't really trust some random guy and his car who got hired even after a quick background check and quick vehicle safety inspection/one hour safety briefing. This right here just reenforces that feeling of distrust, which has been laid on the foundation of distrust that both companies have ignored cities' orders that they register as taxi services.

I guess the fact that Lyft is doing better than Uber has ruffled the feathers of Uber employees and/or loyal customers. It's helps that Lyft makes more sense as a name for a public transport company compared to Uber.[1] It's still petty what's going on here.

[1] Uber started out as Ubercab, though, and had to change their name when it ran afoul of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency. Although, they could have thought of a better name.

Obercabmand West

 

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