FXX Announces Post-Marathon Simpsons Schedule

FXX Announces Post-Marathon Simpsons Schedule

simpsons family

Classic Simpsons to air 24 hours a week on cable network

FXX's #EverySimpsonsEver Marathon has been a ratings winner for the newbie cable network and an ongoing phenomenon in popular culture and on social media. Now, it looks like channel has no plans to let its airwaves be Homer-free again any time soon.

The comedy-focused spin-off of FX has announced the initial broadcast schedule for the long-running animated hit, to which it owns exclusive cable syndication rights. After completion of the Marathon, The Simpsons will begin airing in blocks that break down to about 24 hours worth of programming a week:

Monday: 6pm to midnight
Tuesday: 8pm to midnight
Thursday: 8pm to midnight
Friday: 6pm to midnight
Sunday: 4pm to 8pm

Begun on August 21st, #EverySimpsonsEver has placed the legendary series (soon to begin its 26th season) back into the immediate pop-cultural forefront to a degree it arguably hasn't occupied since the release of The Simpsons Movie in 2007. Next up for the characters: Long-awaited crossovers with both with Family Guy. and Futurama.

Source: Vulture

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....Huh

I'm half surprised and half not surprised. While I would have liked to sit around and watch The Simpsons a few times during that event (I'm under the age of 60 and therefore realize I don't need to spend stupid amounts of money on the three channels I would like), I'm surprised it was that successful.

I suppose this is as good as anything as FXX gets its feet under itself. I'm guessing this will be temporary as it starts creating it's own programming and/or takes programming from FX.

As much as I like the Simpsons, isn't that a bit much? Ah well, at least I'll get a chance to watch episodes I haven't seen in years... though having to wait for an episode I like to come on might be a pain...

This is actually a summation of one of the entertainment industry's big problems. "You liked this thing? Well how about we give you tons and tons and tons and tons of that thing and you just keep giving us money forever?". Derivative game sequels, derivative movies, derivative TV shows. It all stems from that attitude right there.

That's a bit fucking nuts. I know Wilfred's finished and apart from Always Sunny they are the "rerun network" or the "who asked for this network" (Spin City really? Two and a Half Men still has reruns on Comedy Central, Anger Management is still going, did we need to resurrect another show where Charlie Sheen literally plays Charlie Sheen?) but come on they've pretty much just declared that they know they have nothing worthy of primetime viewing.

Racecarlock:
This is actually a summation of one of the entertainment industry's big problems. "You liked this thing? Well how about we give you tons and tons and tons and tons of that thing and you just keep giving us money forever?". Derivative game sequels, derivative movies, derivative TV shows. It all stems from that attitude right there.

It's even more incredible when you think that this perfectly sums up the Simpsons existence. Because once again we can say "I think that might be too much Simpsons".

Well, that ALL fine and dandy and all that... But, does this still mean we would be seeing 4:3 episodes cropped and zoomed to 16:9? Because, outside of everything else, that's something that seems to be bugging me the most right now...

Other than that, HOLY SHIT! Why not just keep advertising us to just buy the damn seasons on DVD ("soon to be on Blu-Ray" if FOX really wants to bring home [more of] the bacon[1]) while you're at it? I probably would have done just that[2] if I wasn't trying to save up money to buy the series box sets of Futurama AND 60's Batman...

[1] Mmmmmmmm... "Bacon".... *drools*
[2] Meh...

Racecarlock:
This is actually a summation of one of the entertainment industry's big problems. "You liked this thing? Well how about we give you tons and tons and tons and tons of that thing and you just keep giving us money forever?". Derivative game sequels, derivative movies, derivative TV shows. It all stems from that attitude right there.

It is only a problem once it stops printing money.

People like Lucas proved that those that like one thing will keep on buying derivative products (merchandising) as long as you can keep feeding them (and in the case of Lucas, that is almost 40 years worth of merchandising); to the point those derivative products can give the movie more money than movie tickets.

 

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