Epic Games Opens Unreal Engine Marketplace to Developers - Update

Epic Games Opens Unreal Engine Marketplace to Developers - Update

Unreal Engine Marketplace 2 310x

Unreal Engine gets an Epic version of Etsy.

Update: I floated a few questions out to Epic regarding some specifics on the Unreal Engine Marketplace.

On Unreal Tournament: I asked Epic about where community content for UT is going to live. It could find a home in this UE Marketplace, or mods could decide to roll out a separate marketplace. Point being: It's a decision that is still too far away in the development process.

On Revenue for Epic, community members: Epic is going with a 70/30 split, meaning 70 cents of every dollar earned by a community member in the Unreal Engine Marketplace goes to that dev, while Epic Games gets 30 cents. Not a bad pull whatsoever, and it's a split many companies use (Amazon, Apple, etc.) use in the digital goods arena.

Original Story: The Unreal Engine 4 features keep a-rollin', don't they?

Epic's latest engine, which has already enjoyed a full release and a new subscription model, get its latest addition today. The Unreal Engine Marketplace is finally live, allowing UE4 developers to buy and sell community-created content of all shapes and sizes.

Epic has already released a substantial amount of free content to UE4 developers, and today's Marketplace activation has even more. A number of new environments, characters, and other assets are now available. And Epic will continue to add content on a regular basis, the real mission is to get content from as many developers as possible live on the UE Marketplace.

To put it simply, the UE Marketplace system is like making hats for Team Fortress 2, but demonstrably more useful, varied.

This also paves the way for community content in Epic's forthcoming games, like Unreal Tournament. Content for the PC shooter is going to live in a similar marketplace, and could even be a baked-in component of the larger Unreal Engine Marketplace. Either way, this marketplace model will eventually be home for developers and players alike.

If you want to go deeper into the UEM rabbit hole, you can check out the official forums for the Marketplace here.

Source: Unreal Engine blog

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I would compare it more to stuff like DAZ-3D which already has a pretty big marketplace, or heck even things like Second Life. They're entering a competitive market.

You gave me a warning, but you still didn't fix your article.

Well, unless this:

"Think

Epic has already released a substantial amount of free content to UE4 developers, and today's Marketplace activation has even more."

Is suppose to make sense.

You want me to 'contribute'? Well, then, stop giving me reasons to critique your unfinished paragraphs.

Alpha Maeko:
You want me to 'contribute'? Well, then, stop giving me reasons to critique your unfinished paragraphs.

I didn't mod your comment, a moderator did. And I think you got dinged because your post, while an attempt at humor, reads like some random wording that a bot would post on a forum.

-Devin Connors
Tech Editor, Bot Hater

Unity engine already has a store built in for users to trade free and commercial, community-made items for use in their projects. I think it's a logical extension to a game engine and has a lot of applicable uses. Likely the main beneficiaries will be the smaller teams, indie devs and one-man shows where being able to get art assets, animations or the like, made by professionals and (hopefully) curated for quality, is a great help and a time saver (particularly when said assets are already *in* the engine, ready to go).

UE3 was far and away the dominant game engine last gen, with so many 360/PS3 and closs platform shooters using it. It's (apparently) a bit more complex than other engines (though less so than Source by all accounts) but clearly UE3 did something right since it was so widely adopted. The new sub model and in-built store IMO are of most benefit to the smaller teams who otherwise might've looked elsewhere for an engine, but it wouldn't surprise me if UE4 does for this XB1/PS4 generation what UE3 did for the last one. UE3 was far too expensive for all but the big studios to adopt, Source was too old and complex (will be interesting to see how Source 2 is received), Unity seems more widely adopted for the mobile/tablet/touch and 2D games.

Will be interesting to see what it's capable of as the next few years come and go. I don't think there are any UE4 games out yet, or if they are there's still many to come. Either way, I haven't played any but I'm sure they'll look good. We're now up to DX11, 8GB RAM and only 3-year old graphics cards (instead of 9) in current gen consoles so games moving forward will hopefully be more complex with bigger maps, better models and textures and better/more plentiful AI.

Finally the AAA market doesn't have the excuse of "Look at my pretty graphics!" anymore. Now they might actually have to compete. This should be good.

 

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