StarCraft II Mod Promises the Cutest Zergling Rush

StarCraft II Mod Promises the Cutest Zergling Rush

The adorable animated YouTube series StarCrafts is getting a mod to bring its 2D world into StarCraft II.

The adorable 2D zerglings and exasperated zealots of CarBot Animation's animated series StarCrafts may soon be under your control. A StarCraft II mod that brings the animated characters into the game is under development, and CarBot Animations has released a preview of the work completed so far. Idle zerglings groom themselves, zealots on hold position look suitably enraged, and the even the marines' death animations are charming. Units will also have animations for dances and cheers. The preview video also introduces some of the buildings that have been implemented in the mod, like the Terran barracks and Protoss pylons.

StarCrafts is CarBot Animations' longest running series. CarBot has also produced videos for several other Blizzard games, including Heroes of the Storm and Diablo III. In March 2014, CarBot launched a new series of animated shorts based on World of WarCraft. The StarCraft II mod was first announced April 11, 2014, along with an announcement that the StarCrafts and Wowcraft animated series would be moving to a biweekly schedule, with new episodes arriving on alternate Saturdays. The scheduling change allowed Johnathan Burton, the animator behind CarBot Animations, enough time to begin working on the mod. Once the first two units and 3 buildings for each race are working, a demo of the mod will be released. CarBot Animations plans to launch a Kickstarter to fund completion of the mod. You can watch development live on the CarBot Animations Twitch channel.

If you're itching to have your own adorable StarCrafts zergling in plushie form, official CarBot merchandise is available from the Blizzard store. Fans can also support Burton's work on Patreon.

Source: CarBot Animations

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Can someone please explain to me what the purpose is of superimposing one's face over the footage like that?

Is there a particular thing he's doing in that little window can cannot be expressed purely by the audio stream?

Scrythe:
Can someone please explain to me what the purpose is of superimposing one's face over the footage like that?

Is there a particular thing he's doing in that little window can cannot be expressed purely by the audio stream?

I think it's a Twitch thing.

Scrythe:
Can someone please explain to me what the purpose is of superimposing one's face over the footage like that?

Is there a particular thing he's doing in that little window can cannot be expressed purely by the audio stream?

While a picture of someone's face doesn't add value to gameplay, it helps live viewers to intereact with content creators. Pure audio is not nearly as good at conveying emotion as video. It is really used to turn the stream from "random full-screen program" to a live stream personality that happens to have something going on in the foreground.

I don't watch twich just for the games. Out of 50 people streaming a game, I watch the one that has a friendly and interactive host. I'll even follow him to other games. For example, Day9 started his channel as a StarCraft commentator, but now hosts multiple gaming shows and has a large fan community that gets together IRL.

TiberiusEsuriens:

While a picture of someone's face doesn't add value to gameplay, it helps live viewers to intereact with content creators. Pure audio is not nearly as good at conveying emotion as video.

I don't have a problem with this arguement, but when the vast emotional spectrum of this guy's commentary essential boils down to Schwarzenegger-esque "Let me verbally describe to you exactly what you're looking at, you blind dipshits.", then then my question remains: What exactly would I be missing if the overlay wasn't there? It's not like there some deeper level of understanding gained from watching a man sit front of a camera, doing what essentially boils down to a sports commentary, except that sports programs have the decency and common sense to not overlay the action with a static image of an old white guy in a suit talking about injuries, or whatever.

TiberiusEsuriens:

It is really used to turn the stream from "random full-screen program" to a live stream personality that happens to have something going on in the foreground.

Again, no reason for the video to be there if you're just listening to a personality. Unless this guy is doing jumping jacks, pole dancing, or speed painting, there's not reason why his face should just be there, completely taking you out of the thing he's trying to show you. If the things this man has to say are so interesting that I cannot fully comprehend the gravitas of his message without gazing upon his miraculous visage, then why even have the gameplay footage?

Most people I know watch these videos as background noise while the do other things, unless the gameplay footage contains something they really need to see.

Let's put another spin on this: what would TotalBiscuit or Jim Sterling gain if they just overlayed their gameplay with their faces, just drag-and-dropped into the frame, like a HUD sticker on a flat screen TV? How would looking at their near-static faces on the screen enhance the audio in such a way that I'm supposed to get some kind of emotional connection with them that magically isn't there with just audio?

Let's face it, in the end of the day, the video screen is either really unnecessary, or the person in that little window is doing something loud and/or obnoxious to gain the viewers' attention, and at that point, you might as well not even have the game there at all.

Scrythe:
Let's face it, in the end of the day, the video screen is either really unnecessary, or the person in that little window is doing something loud and/or obnoxious to gain the viewers' attention, and at that point, you might as well not even have the game there at all.

That's a bit of a binary way of thinking about it. No, certainly not every face in the corner adds immense value. In the heat of gameplay it may just be a guy staring blankly at a screen. Some people have them and never move. Others though, are extremely energetic. There's a reason why people like CarBot have that window so small on the screen. They know it isn't always crazy important, but even then what you or I care about, someone else may not or vica versa. I don't really see a reason for vitriol again face cams though. If someone doesn't like it, just ignore it or move on.

And again for me personally, the a big part of face cams is just distinguishing your video from others. It gets rid of anonymity. They are a person, and it lets their personality and quirks shine through more.

Scrythe:
Can someone please explain to me what the purpose is of superimposing one's face over the footage like that?

Is there a particular thing he's doing in that little window can cannot be expressed purely by the audio stream?

Someone does not understand the concept of livestreaming (videogames).

Instead of bitching about such a minor thing, let's just stay on the topic at hand: CarbotAnimations is awesome, I don't want to know how much time went into this project. Can't wait to play it myself.

I didn't realise just how tight things were at Blizzard that they need a kick starter. I guess Titan was more expensive than we thought?

"This is Carbot, not Blizzard"
They sell carbot stuff on their website and that's good enough for me.

 

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