Post-Apocalypse Game Posthuman Destroys Kickstarter Goal in 12 Hours

Post-Apocalypse Game Posthuman Destroys Kickstarter Goal in 12 Hours

The post-apocalyptic board game Posthuman managed to reach its $27,000 goal in a mere 12 hours.

You know, it's kind of bizarre how much people love the post-apocalypse. Just think about it, whether you're talking zombies, nukes or sentient Austrian robots, post-apocalypse stories are, as a rule, about the world going to hell and pretty much everyone dying. Regardless of that, there's seeming no end to people who love watching, reading and playing entertainment based on a world gone mad. Case in point, the tabletop game design studio Mighty Box, along with its partners Mr. B Games, launched a new Kickstarter yesterday to fund their new apocalypse board game Posthuman. It was an almost instant success.

A mere 12 hours after launching its $27,000 campaign, the creators of Posthuman awoke to discover that enthusiastic backers had already blown past that base line goal. "You know that feeling when you wake up and something awesome has happened while you sleep? That happened last night," said a campaign update. "Posthuman is happening. That lovely box is going to be on all our tables, and we're all gonna be romping around fighting off mutants. We, together! We did it. Overnight." Its success didn't stop there, either. Since reaching that goal, backers have continued to stream into the project pushing its funds raised to more than $74,000 (at the time of this story's publication).

The game itself takes place "in a world where nature is reclaiming the planet." It tasks (1-4) players with traveling "on a solitary journey to a rumored fortress harboring a community of humans." Reaching the fortress entails completing ten zones where they'll encounter obstacles, other humans and mutants who try to kill them. Injuries sustained against mutants can result in a player transforming themselves, after which they'll be able to work against their competitors to stop them from reaching their goal. The big question, of course, is just how much higher its fortunes will rise. With 28 days left in its campaign and its momentum clearly strong, one can't help but wonder if we could have another Conan on our hands. We've reached out to its designers to see if we can learn more about the game and its influences.

Source: Kickstarter

Permalink

You know, I'll never understand how niche appeal titles like this get so many supporters so quickly. Not that I wouldn't have supported it had I know about it; I probably would have. But most kickstarter titles take at least a week just to circulate around the web before meaningful cash comes in.
How do people hear about these projects so quickly? I mean I play board games every week with the gang, but we probably wouldn't have heard about this game until oh...6 weeks after release, let alone pre-production kickstarter campaign.

Do people really just surf kickstarter looking for projects? I mean I've funded a few in my time, but its not like kickstarter sends me emails about projects I may like based on what I've funded in the past.

Silentpony:
You know, I'll never understand how niche appeal titles like this get so many supporters so quickly.
How do people hear about these projects so quickly? I mean I play board games every week with the gang, but we probably wouldn't have heard about this game until oh...6 weeks after release, let alone pre-production kickstarter campaign.

Do people really just surf kickstarter looking for projects? I mean I've funded a few in my time, but its not like kickstarter sends me emails about projects I may like based on what I've funded in the past.

Niche audiences tend to be more invested, informed and starved for what they desire. That is why.

Reason why the STALKER fanbase is rabid and insane and almost religious in devotion :P

OT:

*Checks for STALKER 2 news. Not found. Goes back to sleep mode*

Is this based on the novel series or just its own thing?

Silentpony:
You know, I'll never understand how niche appeal titles like this get so many supporters so quickly. Not that I wouldn't have supported it had I know about it; I probably would have. But most kickstarter titles take at least a week just to circulate around the web before meaningful cash comes in.
How do people hear about these projects so quickly? I mean I play board games every week with the gang, but we probably wouldn't have heard about this game until oh...6 weeks after release, let alone pre-production kickstarter campaign.

Do people really just surf kickstarter looking for projects? I mean I've funded a few in my time, but its not like kickstarter sends me emails about projects I may like based on what I've funded in the past.

You know how there are sites that report on video game news? There are sites like that for board games too.

Scars Unseen:

Silentpony:
SNIP

You know how there are sites that report on video game news? There are sites like that for board games too.

Yeah but take The Escapist for example. They report on gaming news and its more or less good. But I never hear about a game related kickstarter until after its already met its goal. I check the forums maybe twice or three times a day, and I've never just seen someone plugging a kickstarter, trying to get a few more donors and spreading the word.
Its always after-the-fact news that X-Hammer Revival: Hyper Force Go! reached its goal in 2 days. Which good for them, but I never knew it existed in the first place!

Silentpony:

Scars Unseen:

Silentpony:
SNIP

You know how there are sites that report on video game news? There are sites like that for board games too.

Yeah but take The Escapist for example. They report on gaming news and its more or less good. But I never hear about a game related kickstarter until after its already met its goal. I check the forums maybe twice or three times a day, and I've never just seen someone plugging a kickstarter, trying to get a few more donors and spreading the word.
Its always after-the-fact news that X-Hammer Revival: Hyper Force Go! reached its goal in 2 days. Which good for them, but I never knew it existed in the first place!

To be honest, The Escapist isn't really a great source for gaming news if you want to be up to date on the latest. Heck, they don't even review the vast majority of games that come out. This site is more of an editorial/entertainment site. If you want timely news, you find your niche and go to sites that cater to it. For instance, in addition to The Escapist, I frequent sites for visual novels and space related games. As such, I'm far more aware of new products(including Kickstarters and Early Access) related to those two genres(using the term very loosely in the case of visual novels).

Obviously there are people that do the same for board games.

Silentpony:

Scars Unseen:

Silentpony:
SNIP

You know how there are sites that report on video game news? There are sites like that for board games too.

Yeah but take The Escapist for example. They report on gaming news and its more or less good. But I never hear about a game related kickstarter until after its already met its goal. I check the forums maybe twice or three times a day, and I've never just seen someone plugging a kickstarter, trying to get a few more donors and spreading the word.
Its always after-the-fact news that X-Hammer Revival: Hyper Force Go! reached its goal in 2 days. Which good for them, but I never knew it existed in the first place!

well in terms of news content, they only have so many slots..so unless it's a HUGE project by a decently well known developer, they probably won't get around to mentioning the kickstarter.

I could be wrong, but for an average user (such as you and I) isn't it against the rules to just make a thread trying to "plugging a kickstarter"? (I've been tempted to a few times, one quite recently as matter of fact.)

edit: by so many slots, I mean time invested, it's not like monkeys are sitting behind keyboards 24/7 writing news content for the escapist, they've gotta pick and choose.

Silentpony:
You know, I'll never understand how niche appeal titles like this get so many supporters so quickly. Not that I wouldn't have supported it had I know about it; I probably would have. But most kickstarter titles take at least a week just to circulate around the web before meaningful cash comes in.
How do people hear about these projects so quickly? I mean I play board games every week with the gang, but we probably wouldn't have heard about this game until oh...6 weeks after release, let alone pre-production kickstarter campaign.

Do people really just surf kickstarter looking for projects? I mean I've funded a few in my time, but its not like kickstarter sends me emails about projects I may like based on what I've funded in the past.

There is a fairly active online community for boardgamers that centers on boardgamegeek.com. They started discussing Posthuman even before the kickstarter started to you had a small buzz going. Then it got a big bump by being featured on Rahdo Runs Through It, a Youtube channel that reviews and demos board games. It showed that the game is pretty much done and playable as is. That basically turns a Kickstarter into a pre-order system and people are way more willing to support that kind of Kickstarter rather then ones where the lion share of development work still has to be done.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here