Russian Rocket Gets Much-Needed Supplies to International Space Station

Russian Rocket Gets Much-Needed Supplies to International Space Station

EDIT Sunday, July 5th: The capsule has successfully docked with the ISS. On-board the station, the crew tweeted, "feels like Christmas in July."

After a string of failed launches, the International Space Station is on track to receive some much-needed supplies and equipment. A Russian Soyuz rocket had a successful launch on Friday, July 3rd and is on track to rendez-vous with the station on Sunday.

The astronauts on board the ISS can breathe a little easier today - or as easily as anyone can in space. A Russian Soyuz rocket managed a successful launch on Friday, carrying essential food, supplies and equipment to the International Space Station, ending a streak of failures for the space-faring community.

Just last week, SpaceX's Falcon rocket exploded catastrophically minutes after what looked like an optimal launch. After that disaster, NASA's William Gerstenmeier told reporters, "it's space, and it's difficult to go fly," indicating that even when no obvious problems present themselves, the very act of sending a rocket into orbit is fraught with uncertainties.

SpaceX's explosion was just the latest in a series of recent failures in re-supply missions for the ISS. In April, another Russian rocket failed to separate properly from its resource-laden capsule, preventing it from reaching orbit. Doomed from that point on, it finally incinerated on re-entry two weeks later. In October of 2014, a similar event occurred.

"We've always assumed we would lose a vehicle every so often," says Michael Suffredini, manager of the ISS.

"Having three this close together is not what we'd hoped for."

As for Elon Musk's SpaceX itself, the Falcon incident was the third failed attempt in as many months. The first two rockets launched properly but were unable to stick the landing.

It should be noted that each of these missions was un-manned, and there was no loss of life in any of the incidents.

Check out the successful launch on video below:

The Russian rocket, which blasted off from Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, is expected to dock with the ISS on Sunday. While the previous missions all contained a variety of experiments and new parts for the station (including a pair of Hololens headsets), this mission is just carrying the essentials - in other words, lots and lots of astronaut ice cream.

Source: Reuters, NASA

Permalink

Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different rout, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

I read this with the other rocket as follows:

~American made, private Capitalist rocket failed spectacularly while destroying millions of dollars in ISS supplies.

~Russian made, Communist rocket succeeds and sends much-needed supplies to ISS.

Score one for Communism?

FogHornG36:
Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different rout, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

What part of "PRIVATE COMPANY" do you not understand? I really hate these bullshit "Thanks, Obama!" posts that try to put every blaming mistake of America solely on the hands of the Presidential branch of the government. Instead there should be a realization that the government is manipulated by the true fault of America: The capitalist companies that use their money to control everything.

Deathfish15:
I read this with the other rocket as follows:

~American made, private Capitalist rocket failed spectacularly while destroying millions of dollars in ISS supplies.

~Russian made, Communist rocket succeeds and sends much-needed supplies to ISS.

Score one for Communism?

Not really. Article notes that the last failed supply launch was Russian.

Deathfish15:
I read this with the other rocket as follows:

~American made, private Capitalist rocket failed spectacularly while destroying millions of dollars in ISS supplies.

~Russian made, Communist rocket succeeds and sends much-needed supplies to ISS.

Considering how communism is deader than disco in Russia for longer than I live, what?

Some people still dont seem to know what the USSR was or what Russia of today is :P ...

Anyways, good for them. But they are simply MUCH more experienced than SpaceX at this point.

FogHornG36:
Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different route, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

One exploded rocket and we suddenly "cant get a rocket into space anymore." You're opinions are a joke and should be dismissed without consideration.

Well trust a Soyuz rocket to shake the string of mishaps. Whatever else they may be, those things are silly-reliable.

Though yeah what's with all the ignorant, vitriolic crowing?

Thank God the Russians sabotaged the last rocket. We almost didn't need them to get into space anymore.

Scytail:

FogHornG36:
Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different route, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

One exploded rocket and we suddenly "cant get a rocket into space anymore." You're opinions are a joke and should be dismissed without consideration.

What i said was hyperbole, but maybe you should learn to count, the article list two rockets that failed, but my point is based on the fact that nasa has no rockets, and spacex is still in its infancy, i would say yes, it is worrisome that we are not able to get a rocket into space.

Russian Rocket Gets Much-Needed Supplies to International Space Station, lands on Kiev.

Fensfield:
Well trust a Soyuz rocket to shake the string of mishaps. Whatever else they may be, those things are silly-reliable.

Though yeah what's with all the ignorant, vitriolic crowing?

Or you never get to hear about the accidents. It may have escaped your notice, but during the existence of the Soyuz rocket family Russia has not been the most open of states.

oh look a private company fucking up royally no doubt cutting corners or rushing to get all that money then blowing that money the fuck up. Just give those funds to NASA ffs. And the fact that Russia had to step in makes you look even more like dicks. Thou it is an "international" space station. So all good.

But really i can never get over the name SpaceX just the amount of douche ...

Yeah private companies cut corners, but you know what? So do governments.

Charcharo:
Some people still dont seem to know what the USSR was or what Russia of today is :P ...

Anyways, good for them. But they are simply MUCH more experienced than SpaceX at this point.

One has to be fair though; the article lists a couple of failures of SpaceX, but most of those failures were of tests of their experimental landing system. In those cases the actual flight went without a hitch as it too says. Failing that was to be expected, they were cutting-edge trials.

008Zulu:
Yeah private companies cut corners, but you know what? So do governments.

Less so, because in this day and age they have a lot more accountability. Though of course that does differ between countries.

Silk_Sk:
Thank God the Russians sabotaged the last rocket. We almost didn't need them to get into space anymore.

Well, considering that most flights to ISS are made by either Soyuz or Progress crafts AND ISS is made of the same amount of Russian modules as American ones AND crew is half- or mostly-Russian all the time... not really.

Times of Union breaking through the sky and NASA bathing in money are long gone. The ISS program cannot exist without both of it's contributors. NASA and Roscosmos need each other desperately if they want to keep the station running.

RealRT:

Considering how communism is deader than disco in Russia for longer than I live, what?

The thing is - the absolute most of the models of equipment for both Russian and American space programs is all stuff from the age of our grandfathers, sometimes with some minor tweaks and upgrades. Even the supposedly "new" things like Falcon rockets are basically old toys with new stickers.

So yeah - all that stuff was either created by the builders of communism or saw Kennedy's eye. Yeah, think about it. Ancestral technology is in fact part of our world by this point.

albino boo:
Or you never get to hear about the accidents.

There are records of Soyuz accidents - two catastrophes of over a hundred flights, getting it very close safety statistics to another most commonly used spacecraft in history - the shuttles, so I guess it makes sense.

But you are aware that spacecraft launches were not some secret business in the Union - quite the opposite, they were THE biggest media events in the country and were broadcasted live? And that Soyuz is a piloted craft? And that cosmonauts were to the people of Union what the movie stars are for Americans? A TV and radio feed of the launch watched and listened to live by millions and disappearance of huge media figures is not something that can be scraped under a rug. And those catastrophes that did happen were not covered up - it was all over the news and hell, there were memorials erected and streets renamed after the crew members of Soyuz-1 and Soyuz-11 all over the country.

So overall - yep, Soyuz statistic is quite reliable, and it's pretty good overall. Nothing fantastic (shuttles are better by number of launches and worse by number of dead bodies), but pretty good.

Of course, there probably were secret military launches, but those followed other tasks and were launched from other cosmodroms, and used other rockets and other crafts, and it's not like America wasn't doing the same.

AstaresPanda:
oh look a private company fucking up royally no doubt cutting corners or rushing to get all that money then blowing that money the fuck up

Nah, not really. Rocket launches is some job where you are guaranteed to experience quite some fuck-ups. All part of the course. I don't think that people at Musk's company are any less professional than those of NASA or Roskosmos. However...

008Zulu:
Yeah private companies cut corners, but you know what? So do governments.

Space is simply not suited for private enterprise at this point. As any other huge breaking-the-limit development in history. Because the very nature of said developments implies fuckhueg investments with fuckhueg risks. It's just plain bad business. Every time private companies tried to pull the weight on big breakthrough-projects on their own - they either were shot down, or taken under the government wing, or brought in billions in net losses and buried their company. Even SpaceX manages to carry on only by being government's little bitch on the old and tried path of delivering stuff up there.

I'm sure that private companies will come to space eventually - after governments complete the job of making it a nice and safe market as opposed to a frontier. That is - if the capitalism will still be a thing then.

Deathfish15:

FogHornG36:
Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different rout, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

What part of "PRIVATE COMPANY" do you not understand? I really hate these bullshit "Thanks, Obama!" posts that try to put every blaming mistake of America solely on the hands of the Presidential branch of the government. Instead there should be a realization that the government is manipulated by the true fault of America: The capitalist companies that use their money to control everything.

Tip: No one says "Thanks Obama" seriously anymore. They haven't for years.

Silk_Sk:
Thank God the Russians sabotaged the last rocket. We almost didn't need them to get into space anymore.

pls

pls don't

pls don't do this

don't do this

pls

Quick question: Who paid them for it?

Also, SpaceX should probably try to replicate a normal satellite-launch rocket for supplies first and shoot the equivalent weight up into space next time while they work on this. I understand the attempt to create a different rocket because it doesn't need as much up there and therefore different calculations, but first they need to get their space legs where it counts.

Deathfish15:
I read this with the other rocket as follows:

~American made, private Capitalist rocket failed spectacularly while destroying millions of dollars in ISS supplies.

~Russian made, Communist rocket succeeds and sends much-needed supplies to ISS.

Score one for Communism?

FogHornG36:
Thanks Obama.

Its kinda worrisome that we can't get a rocket into space anymore, maybe we should go a different rout, i always enjoyed the idea of a space elevator.

What part of "PRIVATE COMPANY" do you not understand? I really hate these bullshit "Thanks, Obama!" posts that try to put every blaming mistake of America solely on the hands of the Presidential branch of the government. Instead there should be a realization that the government is manipulated by the true fault of America: The capitalist companies that use their money to control everything.

Aaafter two "Russian made, Communist rocket"s explode or burn up, destroying twice as much in ISS supplies. Sure, Go Communism, Woooo.

Obama killed off the funding for NASA which means that the only rockets America has right now are these private companies you seem to hate. So yes, this is a case for "Thanks Obama" because otherwise you might be watching American NASA rockets flying.

Considering that we're essentially strapping equipment to an explosive, volatile device that only takes a modicum of human error to catastrophically fail, we're doing quite good on the average for successful rocket launches. The equipment failures during docking procedures are minor setbacks in the grand scheme of things and that the US has never lost a man or woman in space, only on the way up or back down, within atmosphere, is nothing short of a miracle.
As I said we're essentially rolling the dice with every rocket launch, and until we find a less volatile means of getting things and people up into the void, we run the risk every time we attempt to put up said rocket of losing everything. Its by no means perfect, but again as I mentioned, that we have such a low failure rate of launch is testament to the minds working behind the scenes to ensure these rockets go off with relatively little issues. We also ensure the launch conditions are near-perfect as we can get and slight variances in either temperature or general weather patterns can scrub a launch.
So many safety precautions go into standard launch profiles that its no wonder we have a positive track record. That anyone has negative views on one failed launch is patently ridiculous and creates a false narrative that private companies and NASA before them are unable to handle the responsibility of launching objects and people into space.
Its also quite amazing that NASA has done so much with a comparatively low budget and been more successful than not in its endeavors, same with SpaceX. There are going to be hitches, catastrophes and tragedies in our quest to expand our knowledge of the universe and explore beyond our atmospheric borders and its a great achievement that we've managed to mitigate the catastrophes and tragedies to a very small ratio.

Marxie:
Space is simply not suited for private enterprise at this point. As any other huge breaking-the-limit development in history. Because the very nature of said developments implies fuckhueg investments with fuckhueg risks. It's just plain bad business. Every time private companies tried to pull the weight on big breakthrough-projects on their own - they either were shot down, or taken under the government wing, or brought in billions in net losses and buried their company. Even SpaceX manages to carry on only by being government's little bitch on the old and tried path of delivering stuff up there.

I disagree. Private enterprise is motivated to get out there if for nothing else than the material gains. Opposed to governments which can afford to take it slow. Is it the right way to go in to space? Maybe not. But it will get us there, and that is the objective.

The fuck is wrong with you people... no fucking wonder wars keep happening when an article on international operations make you flip out with your political shit.

Soyuz has been doing this shit since forever, since before there was an international space station, they are the space postal service. Sure might not be the most efficient and high tech piece of equipment, but sometimes you just need a squeaky old van to take some boxes from A to B and if it does so reliably it's still far better then fancy shit that never arrives.

Russia saves the day once more :D

Deathfish15:
I read this with the other rocket as follows:

~American made, private Capitalist rocket failed spectacularly while destroying millions of dollars in ISS supplies.

~Russian made, Communist rocket succeeds and sends much-needed supplies to ISS.

Score one for Communism?

Nyeh. More like tried and tested russian design (progress cargo module first used in 1978, Soyuz rocket system in the 1960's).

Vs.

Brand new, still in the tail end of basic testing phase Rocket designed by a private company. (new engines, new rocket, almost entirely consisting of components made by SpaceX itself... This thing is a lot of 'new' all wrapped up together)

The earliest launches typically hold the most surprises. This is spaceX's 17th launch of anything at all, and the 6th of this design of rocket.
These numbers include some very basic things which were done only for testing purposes, and barely really even count as proper launches.

These are not really comparable things regardless of who made them.

RealRT:
Considering how communism is deader than disco in Russia for longer than I live, what?

Technically they're accurate. Given the Soyuz rocket family was developed in the 60s. Though the specific rocket variant used is actually a Soyuz-2.1a, which was post Soviet era ... not a Soyuz like the article says.

(edit) If this article was taken at face value, totally a communist rocket. Probably one of the most successful rocket designs in history. It has good pedigree, given a lot of it was adapted from the highly successful Vostok series rocket family.

Ah, the good old R-7. You can't beat that booster separation.

Marxie:

albino boo:
Or you never get to hear about the accidents.

There are records of Soyuz accidents - two catastrophes of over a hundred flights, getting it very close safety statistics to another most commonly used spacecraft in history - the shuttles, so I guess it makes sense.

But you are aware that spacecraft launches were not some secret business in the Union - quite the opposite, they were THE biggest media events in the country and were broadcasted live? And that Soyuz is a piloted craft? And that cosmonauts were to the people of Union what the movie stars are for Americans? A TV and radio feed of the launch watched and listened to live by millions and disappearance of huge media figures is not something that can be scraped under a rug. And those catastrophes that did happen were not covered up - it was all over the news and hell, there were memorials erected and streets renamed after the crew members of Soyuz-1 and Soyuz-11 all over the country.

So overall - yep, Soyuz statistic is quite reliable, and it's pretty good overall. Nothing fantastic (shuttles are better by number of launches and worse by number of dead bodies), but pretty good.

Of course, there probably were secret military launches, but those followed other tasks and were launched from other cosmodroms, and used other rockets and other crafts, and it's not like America wasn't doing the same.

Really here's the video, released at the time, of the failure of the first launch of the Trident D5 SLBM

Nasa also publishes the data of all satellite launches, including one with military payloads. Where is the Russian data? Turns out if your country is run by an ex KGB thug that sends people out to use radioactive points for revealing the systemic corruption in the Kremlin, that truth isn't the highest priority.

albino boo:

Where is the Russian data? Turns out if your country is run by an ex KGB thug that sends people out to use radioactive points for revealing the systemic corruption in the Kremlin, that truth isn't the highest priority.

Well here's a news cover of a failed Bulava missile launch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYVcgwvPGok

I wonder how Mr. Ex-KGB Thug let this one slip. All that news team is probably mining uranium ore now. /sarcasm

I also wonder what one needs to smoke to think that American secret SDI and other military projects launches were public in their time. I wonder how much American public of that time knew about Brilliant Pebbles, Delta Star and other programs that in one way or another violated the Outer Space Treaty.

I also wonder what ICBM tests have to do with demilitarized space exploration programs and Soyuz in particular.

I also don't understand the compulsory desire to slander the government of a country one does not live in, visit or know anything about. If you worry for the security of your own land - go serve in military. We brainwashed sheeple are doing just fine without your revelations, leave us to our due.

Hell, I live in Belarus. While it means a shitton of relatives and friends in Russia - The Ex KGB Thug is not my president.

albino boo:
that truth isn't the highest priority

Truth is never the highest priority for the government. Security is. Just ask NSA.

Marxie:

albino boo:

Where is the Russian data? Turns out if your country is run by an ex KGB thug that sends people out to use radioactive points for revealing the systemic corruption in the Kremlin, that truth isn't the highest priority.

Well here's a news cover of a failed Bulava missile launch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYVcgwvPGok

I wonder how Mr. Ex-KGB Thug let this one slip. All that news team is probably mining uranium ore now. /sarcasm

I also wonder what one needs to smoke to think that American secret SDI and other military projects launches were public in their time. I wonder how much American public of that time knew about Brilliant Pebbles, Delta Star and other programs that in one way or another violated the Outer Space Treaty.

I also wonder what ICBM tests have to do with demilitarized space exploration programs and Soyuz in particular.

I also don't understand a compulsory desire to slander the government of a country he does not live in, visit or know anything about. If you worry for the security of your own land - go serve in military. We brainwashed sheeple are doing just fine without your revelations, leave us to our due.

Hell, I live in Belarus. While it means a shitton of relatives and friends in Russia - The Ex KGB Thug is not my president.

albino boo:
that truth isn't the highest priority

Truth is never the highest priority for the government. Security is. Just ask NSA.

Shall we ask the family of Boris Nemtsov abou that? Another one of Putin murders. The President of Belarus, I wonder if that's the same Alexander Lukashenko that is under sanctions for human rights abuses and is close of ally the murderous thugs in Moscow?

albino boo:
pfffrrrrrrt

Hi /pol/. Bye, /pol/.

Some good news.

It seems that this threat is turning in to a political argument again. It's important to seperate between the engineers and the politicians in a country.

Then again, people already made up their mind.

Marxie:

albino boo:

Where is the Russian data? Turns out if your country is run by an ex KGB thug that sends people out to use radioactive points for revealing the systemic corruption in the Kremlin, that truth isn't the highest priority.

Well here's a news cover of a failed Bulava missile launch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYVcgwvPGok

I wonder how Mr. Ex-KGB Thug let this one slip. All that news team is probably mining uranium ore now. /sarcasm

I also wonder what one needs to smoke to think that American secret SDI and other military projects launches were public in their time. I wonder how much American public of that time knew about Brilliant Pebbles, Delta Star and other programs that in one way or another violated the Outer Space Treaty.

I also wonder what ICBM tests have to do with demilitarized space exploration programs and Soyuz in particular.

I also don't understand the compulsory desire to slander the government of a country one does not live in, visit or know anything about. If you worry for the security of your own land - go serve in military. We brainwashed sheeple are doing just fine without your revelations, leave us to our due.

Hell, I live in Belarus. While it means a shitton of relatives and friends in Russia - The Ex KGB Thug is not my president.

albino boo:
that truth isn't the highest priority

Truth is never the highest priority for the government. Security is. Just ask NSA.

Compulsory slander? I didn't realize someone criticizing a government for something they disagree with registered as compulsory slander. I can't respect Russia's government after the BS that they did to Ukraine recently.

Bat Vader:
I can't respect Russia's government after the BS that they did to Ukraine recently.

I've been making trips to Lugansk for the past year to see my old friend. Friend who was born there, raised there and now fights there. Against the Ukrainian government.

Now, I don't think that my friend or his comrades are heroic freedom-fighters. It's just that I've seen some and know some, and there is a lot more to what happens there than what CNN or RT have say. The entirety of the CIS has been a huge mess since the day it came into being, and Ukraine was the messiest part of it, and now it got taken up to a whole new level. No rights in this disaster, only a huge mountain of wrong - the war, and I dare you to pinpoint someone who have single-handedly started it. Russia contributed. America contributed. The Maidan contributed. The rebels contributed. The new Ukrainian government contributed. Everyone fucked up big time, and now the entire region needs medicine and still gets weapons because nobody of those who fucked up wants to backpedal.

Go to Lugansk, or Sevastopol, and see for yourself - there is no simple solution to everything that piled up there after the fall of the Union, and nobody to point your finger at and say "He is to blame for it!" All you will find are people who are afraid that there will be no tomorrow for them and are looking for a way out. Some are fleeing, some are fighting, some are hiding with what they have. One peninsula got a "get out of civil war free"-card. Everyone can see Russia's simple strategic interests there, but I can't blame the people who jumped that chance like crazy - most of them were born in an Autonomous Republic that was a part of the Union, and ended up as citizens of Ukraine not by their own choice, but by decisions of the bunch that cut the Soviets into pieces, and now they had a disaster on their doorstep.
Hell, I can't even blame Putin for wanting to hold for his naval bases at all costs - with NATO rising it's strength all over Europe and American ships traversing the Black Sea like it's their home.

And please do tell me how framing unsolved murders on the government is not slander.

Tl;dr would be: Guys, Ronald Reagan called us and our brethren and neighbors an Evil Empire back in goddamn 1983. I thought that 30 years and one geopolitical catastrophe later you grew out of it a bit. There are no evil empires on this planet, only usual empires that point their fingers at one another and scream "He's the bad guy!" non-stop. I don't ask for respect toward Russian government - only to see it as bit more that the bogeymen that western median paints it to be. That image is no closer to the truth than RT propaganda and only works to сultivate prejudice and hatred.

And I still wonder how did we get to "Russia fucked up Ukraine" from Soyuz craft helping the guys on the ISS.

lacktheknack:

Silk_Sk:
Thank God the Russians sabotaged the last rocket. We almost didn't need them to get into space anymore.

pls

pls don't

pls don't do this

don't do this

pls

You guys realize I was addressing ALL of you, right? >:(

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here