Philip Jose Farmer Dies

Philip Jose Farmer Dies

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Philip Jose Farmer, the prolific and award-winning science fiction Grand Master, has died.

Born in 1918, Farmer was well-known as an author of both short stories and novels in the science-fiction and fantasy genres. His career began in 1953 with The Lovers, which won him the Hugo Award for Most Promising New Writer, and eventually spanned more than 50 years, resulting in dozens of novels, short stories and essays.

Farmer never achieved the level of success in his home country of the United States that he did elsewhere but he was often recognized by his peers for his outstanding work. He was nominated for Hugo and Nebula Awards several times following his 1953 win before taking the 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novella with Riders of the Purple Wage and the 1972 Hugo for Best Novel with To Your Scattered Bodies Go. In 2000 he received the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award for lifetime achievement, putting him among the ranks of such legends as Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Frederik Pohl and Andre Norton, and in 2001 he was given the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement.

"Philip Josť Farmer passed away peacefully in his sleep this morning," a message posted on the author's website says. "He will be missed greatly by his wife Bette, his children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, friends and countless fans around the world. We love you Phil." He was 91.

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While I've never read his works, its sad to see an acclaimed author die.

His book Dayworld was one of my favorite Sci-Fi books growing up (The rest of the trilogy, less favorite). It's always sad to see good authors go. :(

...I've never heard of him.
There is something wrong about that.

never heard of him

Damn, I loved Tarzan Alive and Doc Savage: His Apocalyptic Life, brilliant revisionist pulp...

Sad to say I've never heard of the man but I am sorry that he has passed on.

NoMoreSanity:
While I've never read his works, its sad to see an acclaimed author die.

Same, now would be a good time for me to read some of his works.

Read an hexalogy from him years ago, kinda crazy, liked it.

RIP. He lived a long life.

Too bad that he died, but his Riverworld thing? Meh. I've read only the last book, but it left me completely underwhelmed. Too many logical and scientific bugs in the story.

He was 91.

People eventually die.

Read more, people! Blogs don't count!

High class original SF and fantasy. Reading Farmer is almost always a new experience, and those rare times it isn't, odds are it's because you've read something by one of the many authors who were inspired by Farmer.

I'm not sure what saddens me more: The fact that so many people haven't heard of him or idiotic comments like "people eventually die."

Anyway, Farmer was a groundbreaking sci-fi author who came of age during the 50s and 60s, in the heyday of guys like Asimov, Clarke, Pohl, Ellison and so many others. The announcement of his Grand Master award said he "pioneered the exploration of crucial human relationships" in the genre, which is a fancy way of saying he wrote about sex a lot. And while I certainly don't hold ignorance about the specifics of his work against people (I'm not terribly familiar with it by any stretch) it boggles my mind that so many people haven't even heard of him.

Maybe I'm being unreasonable or unfair but how anyone can look at that Grand Master list and not be awed is completely beyond me. The burden of a sci-fi nerd, I suppose. RIP, Mr. Farmer.

Kross:
His book Dayworld was one of my favorite Sci-Fi books growing up (The rest of the trilogy, less favorite). It's always sad to see good authors go. :(

I loved Dayworld...
R.I.P Awesome Author.
It's sad to see that this world will never be blessed with his literary greatness any more.

Ashes to ashes dust to dust.

Malygris:
The announcement of his Grand Master award said he "pioneered the exploration of crucial human relationships" in the genre, which is a fancy way of saying he wrote about sex a lot.

Did he ever. There's a short story entitled something like 'Mother' which is a really trippy and disturbing bit about an explorer sort of going a male archer-fish route with a hill-sized alien lifeform. Between Farmer, Heinlein, and Anthony, classic sci-fi is full of more sexual weirdness/perviness than you can shake a stick at. Add a dash of Witchworld era Andre Norton feminism to taste.

Malygris:
I'm not sure what saddens me more: The fact that so many people haven't heard of him or idiotic comments like "people eventually die."

He was 91 years old. People eventually die.

If he were 30, this would be news. When you're 91 it's called 'nature'.

People eventually die, no matter how healthy. I'm capable of accepting this; why aren't you?

I've never heard of him...

I really liked To Where Your Scattered Bodies Go. It easily one of the most creative books I read in a long time.

 

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