The GOG Goodbuy 2016 Sale Lets You Save Money and Dodge DRM

The GOG Goodbuy 2016 Sale Lets You Save Money and Dodge DRM

gog-goodbuy-sale-320

There's another holiday game sale on, and this one is completely DRM free.

Its that time of year when it seems like everything is one sale, especially games. Yesterday, we told you about a bunch of game sales, but of course there's another sale that's kicked off since then. This one lets you buy your games DRM-free thanks to GOG.com.

The "Goodbuy 2016 Sale" features ten games that the folks at GOG have picked as the "10 Good Buys of 2016." They are:

  • INSIDE
  • Owlboy
  • Starbound
  • Stardew Valley
  • Grim Dawn
  • Obduction
  • Darkest Dungeon
  • Day of the Tentacle Remastered
  • The Witcher 3: Blood and Wine
  • Shadow Tactics: Blade of the Shogun

In addition, GOG has brought back its host of buildable bundles, with discounts up to 90 percent in some cases. Also of note is all of the DLC for The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt, including the Expansions Pass, is 40 percent off. You'll also see deals on Neverwinter Nights 2, Homeworld Remastered, Rebel Galaxy, The Elder Scrolls: Morrowind, Grim Fandango Remastered, and Fallout 1 & 2, just to name a few.

The sale is more focused than the Steam sale, but if you're looking to pick up any of the games they're offering sans DRM, you're in luck. The sale will run through December 28 at 6 PM ET. You can check out all the deals at GOG.com.

Permalink

Ok, have to ask, why are you pushing the 'no DRM' aspect so hard?

I dont particularly mind if you want to push GOG (Steam really needs the competition) but with the repeated mention of no DRM then to someone who didnt know better it would sound like thats all GOG has going for it over Steam. And of course, DRM isnt a dealbreaker for many people.

gigastar:
Ok, have to ask, why are you pushing the 'no DRM' aspect so hard?

I dont particularly mind if you want to push GOG (Steam really needs the competition) but with the repeated mention of no DRM then to someone who didnt know better it would sound like thats all GOG has going for it over Steam. And of course, DRM isnt a dealbreaker for many people.

DRM is a deal breaker for alot of people, it honestly is.

Though I prefer to tout GoG's quality assurance, since they make sure the games work. They have a more limited selection because of it, but too many games on Steam just dont work after install.

Hell, they have The Elder Scrolls: Arena on GoG, and even made it so you dont have to look up that hard to look up DRM question at the end of the starting dungeon. So when they say DRM free, then seem to mean it.

Saelune:

gigastar:
Ok, have to ask, why are you pushing the 'no DRM' aspect so hard?

I dont particularly mind if you want to push GOG (Steam really needs the competition) but with the repeated mention of no DRM then to someone who didnt know better it would sound like thats all GOG has going for it over Steam. And of course, DRM isnt a dealbreaker for many people.

DRM is a deal breaker for alot of people, it honestly is.

Though I prefer to tout GoG's quality assurance, since they make sure the games work. They have a more limited selection because of it, but too many games on Steam just dont work after install.

Hell, they have The Elder Scrolls: Arena on GoG, and even made it so you dont have to look up that hard to look up DRM question at the end of the starting dungeon. So when they say DRM free, then seem to mean it.

When i said that for 'many' people DRM wasnt a dealbreaker i probably should have said 'most'.

But thats beside the point. It doesnt really matter if you think youre a majority or not, that Steam, despite all the obvious rot its going through, despite its own DRM as well as carrying the last dregs of SecuROM and GfWL, despite being the vector through which many people ran foul of UPlay and Denuvo for the first time, is still the dominant digital distributor.

Therefore, DRM is not a dealbreaker for most people.

gigastar:

When i said that for 'many' people DRM wasnt a dealbreaker i probably should have said 'most'.

But thats beside the point. It doesnt really matter if you think youre a majority or not, that Steam, despite all the obvious rot its going through, despite its own DRM as well as carrying the last dregs of SecuROM and GfWL, despite being the vector through which many people ran foul of UPlay and Denuvo for the first time, is still the dominant digital distributor.

Therefore, DRM is not a dealbreaker for most people.

DRM free is most definitely a valuable asset of GOG, what is there to even argue about? The hate for DRM has died down a little but people still remember the DRM systems that ruined the experience for people who paid for their games and did nothing to stop the pirates.

Even while the "crusade" against DRM may have somewhat toned down and people have come to accept Steam for instance, there are still many people who despise having 3 forms of DRM installed on your system. As for Saelune, to me also having a DRM has been a make or break kind of thing on multiple occasions, mainly due to game being on Origin or UPaly. Even on Twitch streams, I've heard UPlay being cursed time after time, while people being excited about UPlay being forced upon them - exactly none.

A little indication of the significance of the DRM is easily reflected in the sales. For example, on G2A the general trends is that UPlay and Origin keys are 10-25% cheaper than Steam keys for the same game. From personal experience of having done some business on G2A I can also say that it's significantly harder to sell Origin/Uplay games than it is for steam, even at lower prices.

So I believe you are gravely underestimating the amount of people that take DRM into account while buying games.

Mhmh:

gigastar:

When i said that for 'many' people DRM wasnt a dealbreaker i probably should have said 'most'.

But thats beside the point. It doesnt really matter if you think youre a majority or not, that Steam, despite all the obvious rot its going through, despite its own DRM as well as carrying the last dregs of SecuROM and GfWL, despite being the vector through which many people ran foul of UPlay and Denuvo for the first time, is still the dominant digital distributor.

Therefore, DRM is not a dealbreaker for most people.

DRM free is most definitely a valuable asset of GOG, what is there to even argue about?

I never said that DRM-free wasnt an asset in GOG's favour, i said that it wasnt GOG's only asset in its favour and that the article should have mentioned some of those positives instead of reiterating on DRM-free several times.

Mhmh:
The hate for DRM has died down a little but people still remember the DRM systems that ruined the experience for people who paid for their games and did nothing to stop the pirates.

Yes we all remember That Which Must Not be Named, and may its successor wither and die with it.

Mhmh:
Even while the "crusade" against DRM may have somewhat toned down and people have come to accept Steam for instance, there are still many people who despise having 3 forms of DRM installed on your system. As for Saelune, to me also having a DRM has been a make or break kind of thing on multiple occasions, mainly due to game being on Origin or UPaly. Even on Twitch streams, I've heard UPlay being cursed time after time, while people being excited about UPlay being forced upon them - exactly none.

I personally cant say anything about Origin, since im one of the few people actually boycotting EA, and have been doing since before Origin was a thing.

And my experience with UPlay has been... kind of tepid. When i got Far Cry 3 on PC way back when i was aware of the issues people were having with UPlay, and when i signed up to UPlay for the first time i was fully expecting issues of my own. But i got nothing. And nothing again with Edward Kenway's Pirate Adventure Game Assassins Creed 4, and nothing again with Far Cry 4. Outside of performance issues at launch, that is.

Mhmh:
A little indication of the significance of the DRM is easily reflected in the sales. For example, on G2A the general trends is that UPlay and Origin keys are 10-25% cheaper than Steam keys for the same game. From personal experience of having done some business on G2A I can also say that it's significantly harder to sell Origin/Uplay games than it is for steam, even at lower prices.

And youre sure that people wanting thier digital libraries concentrated into one service (where possible) isnt a far greater factor in this trend?

Mhmh:
So I believe you are gravely underestimating the amount of people that take DRM into account while buying games.

Well i think we will have to agree to disagree on that point.

The quality of a game always comes first in my book, and things like obtrusive DRM and in some cases even platform exclusivity havent stopped me from going out of my way to enjoy them.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here