programming laptop

I'm in the middle of buying a laptop for programming. My budget is in 250-400 range.

I'm thinking this one.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16834298253&ignorebbr=1

I'll be compiling small to moderate sized programs and running linux mint on it. Not worried about gaming, I'm just curious about any potential bottlenecks, or if this is overkill. I'll be (hopefully) using this for the remainder of my comp sci degree (just a bachelors).

The ssd is obviously more of a perk, but I don't need a ton of space, and it seems like the same cost as getting the same specs with a 1tb hdd.

IMO SSD is important, as is RAM and CPU, for a programming PC.

It has an SSD, reasonable amount of RAM and decent CPU, so should be OK.

But it all depends on the complexity / size of what you code.

I mostly use Oracle and .NET, so I prefer an i7 and 16Gb RAM (to run a local DB, TOAD and Visual Studio on Windows).

Before you decide which laptop to buy, you should note the following important points. Even the best laptop for programming will not give you all that you desire. So In order to pick the best one out always focus on what's your primary need. Whether its memory, RAM, Processor etc.

Price- When it comes to buying a laptop with good specification, the first point comes is how much you are willing to pay? If you are on a low budget, then you should go with low-range or medium range laptops. If you are on a high-budget, then you should definitely go for the best one for your project.

Size- Another factor that comes into consideration is the size of the laptop that you are trying to buy. Size matters because it makes your laptop easy to carry and gives you the comfort of using it. If you travel more, then you should prefer small or medium size laptops as they are light weight too. But, if you work from home, college, company etc then you should prefer a good screen size.

You can check out these top 14 laptops from laptopify
http://laptopify.com/best-laptops-for-programming/

jameslaptop:

Price? When it comes to buying a laptop with good specification, the first point comes is how much you are willing to pay? If you are on a low budget, then you should go with low-range or medium range laptops. If you are on a high-budget, then you should definitely go for the best one for your project.

Thanks for the advice. Learning the basics of coding is one of my main goals for the next one or two years or so. Mainly cause I'm working in a job where having basic programming skills is a big advantage careerwise. I've been looking for some basic advice on the web and found this article quite helpful listing different programming languages and online sources: https://www.1and1.com/digitalguide/websites/web-development/learn-to-code-an-intro-on-how-to-get-the-basics-down/

Which programming language do you recommend to start with? I know some basic HTML and CSS and would like to learn HTML5 for a start, before venturing into the proper programming languages. What do you think the next step should be? JavaScript seems to be a programming language that is often mentioned as being suitable for beginners.

I'm thinking of getting an Lenovo ideaPad 300 (i5, 8 GB RAM, 1TB HDD) which currently sells at 460$. Would this be a suitable first programming laptop in the under 500$ price range?

for under $400 you can get nice processor but make sure to get at least core i5 and 4 GB of ram, i think the Asus has great laptops under that price with good performances

You're going to hate me for this, but if this is for professional work, you're going to want to increase your budget by at least $300 and go business grade.

So, what's the difference? In a single term: build quality. A consumer grade laptop is built to last 2-3 years with a couple of hours use per day. A business grade laptop is built to last at least 6-8 years with 8-10 hours use per day. When I replaced my laptop about a year ago, I got an HP ProBook 455 G3 with Windows 7 Professional and upgrade rights to Windows 10 Professional. It also came with a matte screen for easier use, around six hours of battery life, spill proofing, an accelerometer that parks the hard drive if the laptop enters freefall, and no bloatware - all of the programs included are actually useful. As well, you get the Professional variant of the operating system, which on Windows 10 means you get to go onto the business update track and avoid most of the bugs that have been wreaking havoc on everybody else.

And, if you can get one that has passed MIL STD testing (like my ProBook), the thing will be damn near indestructible. So, you're paying more than you would on the consumer side for the system specs, but you're getting actual build quality for your money, and you won't have to buy another laptop for a very long time.

EDIT: And, having now looked at the link, it is already a business grade machine. Now I feel a bit silly, but a couple of people mentioned consumer grade machines in the thread, so perhaps this post will still be useful...

I thought content and programming chipsets up to snuff was Intel Broadwell and Haswell processors for computer science stuff?

Solid state drives are still too small for my liking.

What are you going to program and do with the PC, technically you can use any computer to program.

Part of programming is alwys testing and maybe debugging. You don't need only a laptop for the coding itself, it should also be good enough to actually run your code on it (and have some additional stuff running at the same time.)

That is not really important for a beginner taking the first few steps into programming, but it is important to keep in mind when shopping for programming laptops.

Which programming language do you recommend to start with? I know some basic HTML and CSS and would like to learn HTML5 for a start, before venturing into the proper programming languages. What do you think the next step should be? JavaScript seems to be a programming language that is often mentioned as being suitable for beginners.

I would have suggested something more different and less website focused when you want to broaden your spectrum. C# is popular today but as you want to probram with linux, i would go for the older C++.

SSD is more than important for programming. It is hard to find some of them with that price. The software itself needs a decent processor in order run it. My best luck is finding one of them with at least Intel I5 or you could even go with AMD processor with offers more power and better price. Asus or Acer is usually offering some good laptop with decent hardware or you can go with some Chinese laptop that offers great things with their price.

Solid state drives are still too small for my liking.
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tehdlir:
Solid state drives are still too small for my liking.
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Can we get this banned? It's spam, and a clever one at that.

 

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