When should I update my i5?

As the topic says, wondering how long my i5-2500 (non-K) is gonna last, namely because I intend to get a GTX 1070 eventually. It's hard to tell how much games actually tax the CPU, because so far, it's holding up extremely well, and we are quite settled in this console generation and I don't imagine games to get much more demanding for awhile yet. For simplicity, I'll list out my questions:

a) How different is the i5 2500 to an i5 6500 Skylake? Would I notice this in games, or what type of games?
b) Will the i5 2500 bottleneck at all with the GTX 1070? So far with my gtx 970 on the main computer, everything runs fine including Witcher 3 (on High everything at 1080.)
c) Upgrading motherboard, and RAM for the new socket is costly. Is DDR4 and all the rest worth it?

Thanks much y'all

Ok no replies yet, so I did some of my own research. Posted my conclusions below in case anyone else is curious:

It seems like the i5's, despite the socket change and a couple years between them, are largely the same in performance (equivalent models that is). Why, I'm not sure. I've decided to just stick with it and throw in the GTX 1070 when the price comes down a bit, and only upgrade the rest of everything (mobo, RAM etc) when they die.

... I just bought an I5 2500k. There still is room to upgrade. Refurbished socket 1155 I7s aren't all that expensive and you could get a higher frequency RAM set, provided that it's supported by your motherboard.

In any case, here:

beyondbrainmatter:
... I just bought an I5 2500k. There still is room to upgrade. Refurbished socket 1155 I7s aren't all that expensive and you could get a higher frequency RAM set, provided that it's supported by your motherboard.

In any case, here:

I just checked back and noticed your reply, thanks for that, friend. Yeah sadly I don't have the K-version, I'm one of those who's regretting it now...especially seeing how aftermarket cooling has gotten so much simpler these days. I might just check how high RAM speed my mobo can support, 2133 seems like a worthwhile endeavor.

Thanks for the video link, very insightful. And goes to show I wasn't completely off the mark, if anything, the newer Skylake processors are just offering more consistent (if not slightly higher) framerates, just less severe dips. But unless we're talking lower than 45fps dips, we should be alright.

JohnnyDelRay:
the newer Skylake processors are just offering more consistent (if not slightly higher) framerates, just less severe dips. But unless we're talking lower than 45fps dips, we should be alright.

Just figured I'd drop my two cents. While the 2500 is a solid CPU and won't bottleneck even on a single GTX 1080, there's nothing wrong with considering options for a little future-proofing. Kaby Lake will be out in a few months and not only will you get a decent speed bump but any upgrade will also give you PCIE 3.0, native USB 3, more SATA3 ports and M.2 support, all good for the future. Of course you'll be right with a single 1070 just don't try to SLI :)

MercurySteam:

Just figured I'd drop my two cents. While the 2500 is a solid CPU and won't bottleneck even on a single GTX 1080, there's nothing wrong with considering options for a little future-proofing. Kaby Lake will be out in a few months and not only will you get a decent speed bump but any upgrade will also give you PCIE 3.0, native USB 3, more SATA3 ports and M.2 support, all good for the future. Of course you'll be right with a single 1070 just don't try to SLI :)

Hey there, thanks for your input too! Yeah I was just hearing about Kaby Lake and I'm thinking to hang out for awhile until it's fully released. See the price factor for one, if it's worth making the jump straight, OR seeing if it makes Syklake drop enough to be finding on the cheap. Those features are future proof indeed, yeah not going SLI at all but I think if even pondering venturing into stuff like VR, this would be handy. Good thing they're using the same socket, I'm guessing that means Kaby Lake mobo's will be backwards compatible?

JohnnyDelRay:
Good thing they're using the same socket, I'm guessing that means Kaby Lake mobo's will be backwards compatible?

They will be but likely the features on the new chipset will be disabled so no real point on using old CPU on new mobo unless unless you can't find x170 series mobos.

MercurySteam:

JohnnyDelRay:
Good thing they're using the same socket, I'm guessing that means Kaby Lake mobo's will be backwards compatible?

They will be but likely the features on the new chipset will be disabled so no real point on using old CPU on new mobo unless unless you can't find x170 series mobos.

Yeah true that. Not much point then really is there, just getting a newer mobo and throttling it's features. Better just put it down to money once it releases and we see where it's at, and whether the difference is something worth considering for a dedicated gaming machine, or just put the extra money into more/faster RAM.

JohnnyDelRay:
Snip

Something you should be careful about though is PCI-E transfer rates. If your MOBO only has PCI-E 2.0 x16, you won't be able to get the most out of your 10th gen GPU, as those make use of PCI-E 3.0. The differences are strong. If you plug a 3.0 GPU into a 2.0 MOBO, you might not be able to hit the last 25% of performance overhead your GPU is capable of. You might end up throttling your own card. (Basically, you have 2.0 x16 I assume, but if the card has 3.0 x16, you might only be able to make use of 3.0 speeds up to x8, which is equivalent of 2.0 x16. I hope that makes sense)

Elvis Starburst:

JohnnyDelRay:
Snip

Something you should be careful about though is PCI-E transfer rates. If your MOBO only has PCI-E 2.0 x16, you won't be able to get the most out of your 10th gen GPU, as those make use of PCI-E 3.0. The differences are strong. If you plug a 3.0 GPU into a 2.0 MOBO, you might not be able to hit the last 25% of performance overhead your GPU is capable of. You might end up throttling your own card. (Basically, you have 2.0 x16 I assume, but if the card has 3.0 x16, you might only be able to make use of 3.0 speeds up to x8, which is equivalent of 2.0 x16. I hope that makes sense)

Ah, yes! I totally forgot about that! Over a month in this thread and I'm still getting such crucial advice...and I was just about to pull the trigger on a GTX 1060 as a sort of 'medium' approach.

Now I'll have to rethink it again, as that's my biggest concern (throttling the GPU). I'll have to do a bit more homework on motherboards, but it seems like pairing a GTX 1000 series with a Sandy Bridge is not going to do it much justice.

Bottlenecks in "temporary situations" just rub me the wrong way...firstly, the idea of untapped performance while sacrificing your game settings is annoying as hell, secondly, well you have tech in there that you paid good price for you might as well use it, otherwise you should be waiting for the price to come down, right? Definitely gotta sit this one out for a bit longer (full 180 from the start of the thread, I know) thanks for the heads up Elvis!

Elvis Starburst:
Something you should be careful about though is PCI-E transfer rates. If your MOBO only has PCI-E 2.0 x16, you won't be able to get the most out of your 10th gen GPU, as those make use of PCI-E 3.0. The differences are strong. If you plug a 3.0 GPU into a 2.0 MOBO, you might not be able to hit the last 25% of performance overhead your GPU is capable of. You might end up throttling your own card. (Basically, you have 2.0 x16 I assume, but if the card has 3.0 x16, you might only be able to make use of 3.0 speeds up to x8, which is equivalent of 2.0 x16. I hope that makes sense)

JohnnyDelRay:
Ah, yes! I totally forgot about that! Over a month in this thread and I'm still getting such crucial advice...and I was just about to pull the trigger on a GTX 1060 as a sort of 'medium' approach.

While it's an understandable thing to be concerned about, this theory has been debunked already in the past with even a GTX 1080 at PCIe 3.0 x8 showing only a delta difference of 0-3 percent depending on the game. Safe to say that as long as you're running PCIe 2.0 in x16 mode you should be okay but that being said, there's nothing wrong with upgrading around Kaby Lake release to kick back the tide.

i have Lenovo z50 with core i5 processor with no problems and don't need an upgrade and run till GTA V without any problems, you should upgrade if you need to play those heavy games with the highest graphic setting otherwise you will not need.
you can buy 2 in 1 laptops for outgoing but still your laptop is the primary one.

aliwaaliwa:
i have Lenovo z50 with core i5 processor with no problems and don't need an upgrade and run till GTA V without any problems, you should upgrade if you need to play those heavy games with the highest graphic setting otherwise you will not need.
you can buy 2 in 1 laptops for outgoing but still your laptop is the primary one.

Not everyone on this forum seems to realise that desktop and laptop components are very different, some laptop i5s aren't quad cores while all desktop ones are, and you'll find manufacturers (Lenovo is one of them) that will pair an i7 with a weak sauce GPU. Strictly speaking unless you need your main computer to be portable, there is no good reason you'd be gaming on a laptop over a desktop. They typically cost more for worse specs (over desktops) and don't have the longest lifespan.

 

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