D&D 5e flavoring question

Anyone know a cantrip that can alter the sound of lute strings being strum? I have a flavor idea for one of my characters.

Basically, through trial and error, my bard figured out a sound that, while many seem to like, others seem skeptical on whether or not it'll catch on. Specifically, he discovered the sound of an electric guitar.

Anyone got any ideas?

Prestiditation. Pg 267 of Player's Handbook.

The first effect lets you create simple 'sensory effects' including musical notes.

Saelune:
Prestiditation. Pg 267 of Player's Handbook.

The first effect lets you create simple 'sensory effects' including musical notes.

I read about it, what about the sounds playing as the lute's being strummed?

For example, would he be able to play this on his lute when it's Presidigitated?

DarklordKyo:

Saelune:
Prestiditation. Pg 267 of Player's Handbook.

The first effect lets you create simple 'sensory effects' including musical notes.

I read about it, what about the sounds playing as the lute's being strummed?

For example, would he be able to play this on his lute when it's Presidigitated?

I mean, at a point it's really up to the DM how much they will let you stretch out the spell. Really, as long as you arent abusing it to gain more than it can give, I figure most DMs will let you get away with just flavoring how you want.

Saelune:
I mean, at a point it's really up to the DM how much they will let you stretch out the spell. Really, as long as you arent abusing it to gain more than it can give, I figure most DMs will let you get away with just flavoring how you want.

Point, thanks for the input

What Saelune said and Thaumaturgy maybe?


It's not a bard spell but you do get it if you're a Teifling.

Also Minor illusion sounds like it could work within its wording.

I'd easily let you do what your trying to if I was the DM.
Electric bard and his thunder wave.

Okay, I talked with one of my DMs about it (two different groups), and he said he'd allow it if given a good enough reason for it being a thing. Can anyone suggest an in-universe justification better than "experimented, and eventually found something he liked through trial and error?"

DarklordKyo:
Okay, I talked with one of my DMs about it (two different groups), and he said he'd allow it if given a good enough reason for it being a thing. Can anyone suggest an in-universe justification better than "experimented, and eventually found something he liked through trial and error?"

Do you need a better reason? To me that sounds like the most reasonable and justifiable explanation for what you are looking to do. Saelune nailed it with prestidigitation. Say a muse brought it to you in a dream or vision.

I suppose you could go more fantastical and work with the DM and see if your lute has some minor magical property. Or perhaps the strings come from the hair/gut of some specific creature with electrical properties or something similar.

Yeah, D&D is so fantastically magic heavy that "I modified my lute to sound different" shouldn't be more than an afterthought, mechanically speaking.

'Course, I'm the sort of guy that thinks D&D settings that try to be remotely "realistic" are rather missing the point. Changing the sound or flavor or color of something is so trivial that mages can do it forever for free. And that's all one spell. At level one your average mage can cast a spell that has a good chance at killing a bar full of peasants. (Minus the bartender, because that's the profession fighters retire into).

altnameJag:

'Course, I'm the sort of guy that thinks D&D settings that try to be remotely "realistic" are rather missing the point.

Ugh, Im one of those. But as I went on, I really started to consider what 'realism' means in a DnD world. I still strive for realism, but now I am going for "realism in the context of fantasy". Now it is common for doors to facilitate the various sizes of beings and thus have multiple handles for small, medium and large sizes.

DarklordKyo:
Okay, I talked with one of my DMs about it (two different groups), and he said he'd allow it if given a good enough reason for it being a thing. Can anyone suggest an in-universe justification better than "experimented, and eventually found something he liked through trial and error?"

Easy. Don't make it a cantrip. A wizard did it to your Bard. Curses are a thing in D&D, you know, and can give their victims donkey ears, a short attention span, partial petrification, an extra finger on each hand, total magical immunity, force them to beat themselves up once a day, etc. They are ripe for custom inconveniences. In this case, our vindictive spellcaster felt that the most apt punishment for your bard was to make it so that the things he touches sound wrong. Truly, a terrible punishment for someone who makes a living by playing instruments. Your Bard has just figured out how to make the altered lute sounds work.

 

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