Gaming: What is this newfangled televisual entertainment medium?
'What is?'
'What is?'

I am aware that something similar was done back in March. However, in accordance with the posting guidelines, and keeping in mind the fact that my topic is significantly different, I have created a new thread.

I present a hypothetical:
You, as a gamer and an individual capable of forming coherent sentences, are approached by a person who claims to have no prior knowledge or understanding of gaming. This person requests that you impart some of your knowledge unto them; more specifically, they ask: "What is gaming?" Moreover, they offer you a reward of twelve cents, to be given upon satisfactory completion of this task.

I would reply that gaming is a hobby, much like any other. It includes many genres, much like films, television, music et cetera. It is oft incorrectly perceived by the uninformed as a past exclusive to children and murderers, thus there are those who wish to heavily censor games in the hopes of protecting the children and making the murderers take up more wholesome hobbies, like stalking and small arms training.

Game development can involve hundreds of people, and budgets often stretch into the tens of millions, hence less than one in seven games actually turns a profit. Multiple platforms for games has resulted in nonsensical partisan rivalries between those that think their system of choice is best; this behaviour is often referred to as 'Fanboyism'.

How do you respond?
Twelve cents[1] and possibly a bagel awaits you!

Tl;dr: Honestly, I think you have a learning disorder... Please go back and read it.

[1] Disclaimer: Please note, in order to obtain the promised monetary amount, you must perform the following acts: get a job, cash your paycheck. If you have completed these tasks and find yourself with twelve or more cents, you have succeeded!

You know, now that you bring it up, it's hard to really describe gaming in great detail (well, besides what you just said, basically).

If I had to, I guess I would try to compare it to something recreational the person is familiar with, then try to expand from there. I've always been better at describing through similes than directly.

well said.

I guess I dont really know what I would tell them. For how much of a description that would go into it is not worth 12 cents or a bagel. I would probably just tell them to go experience it themselves. Its not really something you can put into words. If they put a gun to my head and demanded an explenation I would probably say it is just another form of media. What you get out of it and how much you enjoy it is up to you. However if they didnt know what a video game was or really had no idea about them period they probably wouldnt know what a television was or really anything because they apparently have just been born or have lived under a rock (my grandparents have played mario and have at least some understanding of what video games are). So I would most likely be giving them a long tour of world today explaining everything and would probably do it for nothing because he or she most likely just came to wherever they came from and are extremely lost and confused. On that fact if their first question to me is about gaming they probably have their priorities way off and ahh!

I looked into that too much. Like I said I would probably say it is a form of media involving being able to manipulate what is going on there tv. In effect being more or less an active participant in a story or adventure. There are many genres and thousands of games which have a few different mediums in which to play them.

To go into it more would probably confuse the living fuck out of them and my statement in itself probably confused them. At that point I would probably just answer specific question.

I would tell them to buy a PC or Console and a few games. That way they can find out for themselves instead of making me tell them.

You sir deserve a cookie...

In order to claim said cookie, you must go to the store, buy your favorite brand of cookie, and redeem one of those cookies as your prize

Trying to describe what gaming is is actually now that I think of it, really fucking difficult... with no prior knowledge or reference point to a virtual world I'd be stumped.

Its a bit like trying to describe why Uma Thurman is good looking, you know she's good looking but you'd be hard pressed to explain why she is.

Poopie McGhee:
You sir deserve a cookie...

In order to claim said cookie, you must go to the store, buy your favorite brand of cookie, and redeem one of those cookies as your prize

*claps hands*
Bravo.

Very well put, and I loved your Tl;dr suggestion.

Personally, I'd use the same method I used when I tried to explain video games to my grandparents a few years back; start with something similar that they understand, and work your way towards it. I was lucky enough to have a grandfather who was a pretty big boxing fanatic, so it was fairly easy:
It's like a boxing match that you can control. You tell Foreman to move left, he moves left. You tell him to duck right, he ducks right. You tell him to go in for the knockout punch, and he goes in.

I would say: Like a movie: But you control the main guy with a kind of remote.

Do you really mean they have absolutely NO prior knowledge of gaming: i.e. no Dungeons and Dragons Tabletop RPG, Call of Cthulhu, Champions, Albedo, Jade Claw, etc. nor chess, roulette, poker, black jack, euchre, Go, football, baseball, hoop and stick, house, fox and hounds, Pokemon, dolls, ANYTHING? Or do you just mean video games? Please mention if they know what a television or computer is as well. Then I may be able to give you a decent answer. ^-^

Gyrefalcon:
Do you really mean they have absolutely NO prior knowledge of gaming: i.e. no Dungeons and Dragons Tabletop RPG, Call of Cthulhu, Champions, Albedo, Jade Claw, etc. nor chess, roulette, poker, black jack, euchre, Go, football, baseball, hoop and stick, house, fox and hounds, Pokemon, dolls, ANYTHING? Or do you just mean video games? Please mention if they know what a television or computer is as well. Then I may be able to give you a decent answer. ^-^

What is this "High Definition?" I keep hearing about?

Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

Gyrefalcon:
Do you really mean they have absolutely NO prior knowledge of gaming: i.e. no Dungeons and Dragons Tabletop RPG, Call of Cthulhu, Champions, Albedo, Jade Claw, etc. nor chess, roulette, poker, black jack, euchre, Go, football, baseball, hoop and stick, house, fox and hounds, Pokemon, dolls, ANYTHING? Or do you just mean video games? Please mention if they know what a television or computer is as well. Then I may be able to give you a decent answer. ^-^

Feel free to adjust or reinterpret the parameters of the hypothetical as you see fit.

gof22:
I would tell them to buy a PC or Console and a few games. That way they can find out for themselves instead of making me tell them.

But then you're sacrificing twelve cents and a bagel!
Besides, they know nothing; if I were a more cynical person, I'd inform you that they wouldn't be able to tell if you are lying just to get the aforementioned rewards.

Diagonal Horizontality:

Gyrefalcon:
Do you really mean they have absolutely NO prior knowledge of gaming: i.e. no Dungeons and Dragons Tabletop RPG, Call of Cthulhu, Champions, Albedo, Jade Claw, etc. nor chess, roulette, poker, black jack, euchre, Go, football, baseball, hoop and stick, house, fox and hounds, Pokemon, dolls, ANYTHING? Or do you just mean video games? Please mention if they know what a television or computer is as well. Then I may be able to give you a decent answer. ^-^

Feel free to adjust or reinterpret the parameters of the hypothetical as you see fit.

gof22:
I would tell them to buy a PC or Console and a few games. That way they can find out for themselves instead of making me tell them.

But then you're sacrificing twelve cents and a bagel!
Besides, they know nothing; if I were a more cynical person, I'd inform you that they wouldn't be able to tell if you are lying just to get the aforementioned rewards.

I don't need the 12 cents and I really hate bagels.

gof22:

Diagonal Horizontality:
[quote="Gyrefalcon" post="9.149214.3478093"]Do you really mean they have absolutely NO prior knowledge of gaming: i.e. no Dungeons and Dragons Tabletop RPG, Call of Cthulhu, Champions, Albedo, Jade Claw, etc. nor chess, roulette, poker, black jack, euchre, Go, football, baseball, hoop and stick, house, fox and hounds, Pokemon, dolls, ANYTHING? Or do you just mean video games? Please mention if they know what a television or computer is as well. Then I may be able to give you a decent answer. ^-^

Feel free to adjust or reinterpret the parameters of the hypothetical as you see fit.

Okay, well, if you took a good story and made it so that the reader could choose some of the actions of the lead character, added pictures, then made the pictures transparent so you could back light them and then changed the images based on what the reader decided to have the main character do...it would be close. Add some sound effects and music like you have with some of the big pipe organs that can do bird tweets and other sounds as well as play regular notes and you would have a good imitation of the kind of entertainment people are involved with these days. How's that? Can I have my bagel with cream cheese, smoked salmon and tomato on top??

Fun fact: Most game tester applications have you answer a very similar question in order to test your ability to explain and elaborate on a specific product.

When I was younger I applied for these jobs like crazy and no matter what angle I took the same question I could never get the bloody job. It always went to (and I hope this doesn't look bad) some Mexican that was younger than I.

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

Video games are a challenge put out by a team of computer programmers to see if you can beat them by reaching the end. And every once in a while an alien species will put one out to see if you have the skills needed to help them win some war they are involved in using a simulator disguised as a game.

squid5580:

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

Video games are a challenge put out by a team of computer programmers to see if you can beat them by reaching the end. And every once in a while an alien species will put one out to see if you have the skills needed to help them win some war they are involved in using a simulator disguised as a game.

But I'm assuming we don't have television here. And yes, I chose a role-playing game since I figured we hadn't gotten as far as D&D either. Tetris...Take a board game like chess that is made up of shaped blocks like children play with and have pictures of them where you determine what orientation the picture faces. Then attempt to line up the next picture so that if it overlapped it would start to form a solid line out of the shapes. If you make multiple lines two to four deep in the same area at the same time you score more points. (The thing is, in the past adults did not play with children's toys and would have no idea why anyone would want to do such a thing. But reading showed your intellect and aptitudes. So I would have aimed for a reading reference rather than a puzzle game. But perhaps describing it as putting together a picture puzzle with lit pictures would have worked. Hmmm.)

Gyrefalcon:

squid5580:

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

Video games are a challenge put out by a team of computer programmers to see if you can beat them by reaching the end. And every once in a while an alien species will put one out to see if you have the skills needed to help them win some war they are involved in using a simulator disguised as a game.

But I'm assuming we don't have television here. And yes, I chose a role-playing game since I figured we hadn't gotten as far as D&D either. Tetris...Take a board game like chess that is made up of shaped blocks like children play with and have pictures of them where you determine what orientation the picture faces. Then attempt to line up the next picture so that if it overlapped it would start to form a solid line out of the shapes. If you make multiple lines two to four deep in the same area at the same time you score more points. (The thing is, in the past adults did not play with children's toys and would have no idea why anyone would want to do such a thing. But reading showed your intellect and aptitudes. So I would have aimed for a reading reference rather than a puzzle game. But perhaps describing it as putting together a picture puzzle with lit pictures would have worked. Hmmm.)

I think you misunderstood me. I mentioned Tetris because of the post I quoted about story, becoming the protagonist blah blah blah which is not the entirety of gaming. Or even begin to fairly describe gaming to one who has just landed on the planet (or was thawed out or whatever happened). A game doesn't need to be an interactive story to be a game.

Video Games are simply an interactive entertainment medium. They are usually viewed on a television screen and are manipulated by the "player" using some form of hand held controller. They usually tell a story, but don't necessarily have to, and are "played" by 1 or more people and vary in interactivity. Some have a set story that you are simply destined to carry out, while others' outcomes are changed depending upon your in-game choices.
A large portion of the success of these games is the continuity factor of the realism. Meaning that since the entire game is completely fabricated, a game where you sit around drinking tea chatting with your friends and a game where you can fly, time-travel, and are immortal would both be considered as entirely plausible. The depth of the game is simply limited to the developers' (the people that create games) imaginations and artistic ability.

Gaming is the term used for the hobby of playing these games. A "gamer" is essentially a self-bestowed title and can vary in intensity depending upon your own definition of the term.
The world of gaming is quite large and time consuming often causing those that don't participate in it to draw grossly misinterpreted conclusions about those that do. It is seen by some as an addiction and/or a hate/violence generator and the gaming industry is often considered "evil". Many games are excessively violent, but any level-headed gamer understands fully the difference between fantasy and reality. It can even be a healthy outlet for anger and hostility caused by your "real-life" or simply a fun tool of social interaction.

Gaming is a way of life and a very mentally stimulating one at that.

Now... whats up with that bagel?

squid5580:

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

When movies were first invented, people would flock to theaters just to watch a horse run for a few minutes. Film was a new medium, and people were content just to watch things move at first: it wasn't until The Great Train Robbery that a movie ever had a story. Does this make film and less of a storytelling medium? Of course not: the early films were simply the earliest explorations into a new frontier. Once film actually matured, it became the primary storyteller of our culture. Video games have done the same.

Besides, there are plenty of movies that pretty much have no story, they just focus on action or special effects. Do these discredit film as a storytelling medium? Not at all: there are books and plays that do similar things as well. Video games have one thing that none of these other literary art forms have: interactivity. Due to this, good games can be made without having a story: a luxury we no longer afford to films or books. But that does not change what the medium as a whole has become. Though I will admit, gaming is still evolving: it's not quite there yet. But it has become the most effective and impacting storyteller the world has yet seen.

A mate of mine used something like this to describe the point of Philosophy. He said that a parent explains the basics of Football to her son and explains that it is game that people like to play. The son then kicks a chair between two tables and says to the mother "Is that a game?" And this is the basics of Philosophy, taking apart the meanings of words and challenging them.

My answer:

Gaming is a verb meaning to play games, most commonly associated nowadays with the medium of video games -- a sub-medium of gaming which relies on electronic objects with a Graphic User Interface (or GUI) and generally controlled by a computer. As for games, games are a sub-medium of the medium of entertainment -- entertainment being a way of spending time for the sole purpose of being happy as a result, with few repercussions if done in few amounts (with the exception of taking part in the designing of the game). However, if done enough, will have consequences.

As I have already said, video gaming is a sub-medium of gaming. But there are others as well:

Board Games: Given this title for it's use of a card board which pieces to represent players are placed upon, this form of gaming is a very basic form of video gaming with little or none electronics involved.

Sport/ Physical Games: This form of gaming consists of people taking part physically, usually against a foe(s) to achieve a certain goal before they achieve a goal of their own that they have to achieve.

Card Games: These games are done with cards of various values. Some games can use the same series of cards (often referred to as the deck) or customised cards specially designed for the purpose of that game.

Game Shows/ Competitions: These can be across a variety of mediums, but the general idea behind them is that they require a certain skill or variety of skills in order to win, but what that skill is can vary greatly. Game shows are a variation of these which take part on television and almost always consist of some physical prize for winning, rather than just memory, pride and bragging rights.

Whilst these are the most common forms, these are definately not every sub-medium of gaming.

Gaming sometimes involves playing as a character other than yourself (or no character at all, in some cases, in which case you are just referred to as the player) with exceptions obviously, and can be done in both solitary confinement (also known as Single Player) or in group (also known as Multi-Player). Milti-Player, in turn, can be divided into each player playing for themself (known as Free for All) or in teams competing and working together to win (known as Team Playing). Some games can fit into both Free for All and Team Playing and some can even fit into both Single Player and Multi-Player or Single Player and Team Playing, if there is only one team playing.

A player or gamer is someone who plays these games either casually or more determinedly, depending on how far they want to take playing it.

Single Player and Team Playing (when there is only one team playing) usually consists of the players going up against another character or team controlled by a computer, usually referred to as a Non-Playable-Character (or NPC); or they will consist of an aim for the players to complete. In comparison, Multi-Player (both Free for All and Team Playing) features the different players/ teams trying to achieve a common goal before the other team, which can vary from taking out the other team to scoring the most points by doing a certain thing.

There is always one main goal in gaming, to which every other goal is merely a sub-goal leading up to this finale: to win, regardless of whether it is through scoring more points, defeating a certain foe or surviving the longest. How we go about winning varies, and is determined by the rules that make the game what it is. These rules can vary greatly, depending on the medium it is played across (board game, video game, sport/ physical game, card game, game show/ competition etc.) amoung other things. Winning will generally have few repercussions when done in few amounts. However, as I have already said when it comes to gaming in general, when done in large amounts, winning can lead to consequences both good and bad.

Wow, I think I took that a bit too far. I statred small but anything as philosophical as this can make me try and describe everything in as much detail as possible so that my words are almost fully explained. Good luck to anyone who wants to try reading that :P

Please note: Unlike the OP, I have decided not to go into audience/ people's opinions on different games, as a game could be aimed at anyone and pretty much played/ liked by anyone as well, it's just that censorship limits what we can and can't do when designing them and who they are/ aren't aimed at, so audience/ age rating/ specific genres of gaming/ opinions on games/ genres would just take too much to describe fully for what it's worth and the post is large enough anyway, I reckon (seeing as I have spent almost 3 hours on it).

EDIT: I'm guessing that, by this point, the guy would've left the twelve cents and a bagel on the floor and ran off whilst I was mid-rant.

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

When movies were first invented, people would flock to theaters just to watch a horse run for a few minutes. Film was a new medium, and people were content just to watch things move at first: it wasn't until The Great Train Robbery that a movie ever had a story. Does this make film and less of a storytelling medium? Of course not: the early films were simply the earliest explorations into a new frontier. Once film actually matured, it became the primary storyteller of our culture. Video games have done the same.

Besides, there are plenty of movies that pretty much have no story, they just focus on action or special effects. Do these discredit film as a storytelling medium? Not at all: there are books and plays that do similar things as well. Video games have one thing that none of these other literary art forms have: interactivity. Due to this, good games can be made without having a story: a luxury we no longer afford to films or books. But that does not change what the medium as a whole has become. Though I will admit, gaming is still evolving: it's not quite there yet. But it has become the most effective and impacting storyteller the world has yet seen.

I never said it discredits games as a storytelling medium. What I am saying is that storytelling isn't the end all to beat all. There is more to gaming than just storytelling. That doesn't mean a game can't tell a good story. It just doesn't always need a story to be a game.

Pretty much what you said, except I'd leave out the part about the murders.

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
Gaming is the new evolution in storytelling. It is a way to enter the story, become the protagonist, and experience amazing fictional worlds for yourself. It's a way to put yourself in the shoes of heroes as they do things we could only ever dream of. Video games are the definitive way to experience stories, more engrossing than film, more impacting than literature. Gaming is the future of storytelling.

What about Tetris?

When movies were first invented, people would flock to theaters just to watch a horse run for a few minutes. Film was a new medium, and people were content just to watch things move at first: it wasn't until The Great Train Robbery that a movie ever had a story. Does this make film and less of a storytelling medium? Of course not: the early films were simply the earliest explorations into a new frontier. Once film actually matured, it became the primary storyteller of our culture. Video games have done the same.

Besides, there are plenty of movies that pretty much have no story, they just focus on action or special effects. Do these discredit film as a storytelling medium? Not at all: there are books and plays that do similar things as well. Video games have one thing that none of these other literary art forms have: interactivity. Due to this, good games can be made without having a story: a luxury we no longer afford to films or books. But that does not change what the medium as a whole has become. Though I will admit, gaming is still evolving: it's not quite there yet. But it has become the most effective and impacting storyteller the world has yet seen.

I never said it discredits games as a storytelling medium. What I am saying is that storytelling isn't the end all to beat all. There is more to gaming than just storytelling. That doesn't mean a game can't tell a good story. It just doesn't always need a story to be a game.

That is true, I'll give you that. Personally, I hold to the idea that storytelling is the higher form, if you will, of video games. That games with little or no story are for nothing but entertainment, but the medium is defined by the ones that tell a great story. Again, similar to movies and books, where there are plenty out there that exist for reasons other than story; but the main purpose, gaming at its best, is as a form of literature. Due to this outlook, I would describe games as storytelling above all else, regardless of the fact that a story is not necessary required.

Video games are murder simulators invented by Satan to train children to idolise pagan gods and kill their parents. Except they aren't, unless some marketing person thinks that the free advertising from the controversy will make a game like that profitable.

They are basically about a player having control over what is happening on a video screen. People normally start with basic illusions of control like Guitar Hero, translations of traditional games like Windows Solitaire or classic video games with understandable concepts like Space Invaders. Like how people progress from learning to play with a ball to wanting a structured ball game people progress to more complicated games or genres of game like quiz games, side scrolling platform jumping games and all female professional wrestling.

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
one big snip

That is true, I'll give you that. Personally, I hold to the idea that storytelling is the higher form, if you will, of video games. That games with little or no story are for nothing but entertainment, but the medium is defined by the ones that tell a great story. Again, similar to movies and books, where there are plenty out there that exist for reasons other than story; but the main purpose, gaming at its best, is as a form of literature. Due to this outlook, I would describe games as storytelling above all else, regardless of the fact that a story is not necessary required.

Hopefully I caught that before someone rips you a new one. That is afterall the point of movies, non fiction books (those are the unreal ones right I always confuse fiction and non fiction) and games. If they can make you think or teach you a life lesson then that is great. Your criteria for a great game is the story (and I am with you on that, a good story can save a crappy game for me). Although alot of other gamers are going to look for something different in a game. One might need great graphics to be happy. Another might need the killer gameplay (whatever that might be). There is so many aspects to gaming that we can't just say "it needs this to be good" which is why we have a variety to choose from. If you are looking for a deep story there is a game for you. If you want 2 lines of text and then blow shit up for the next 5 hours there is a game for you. Regardless though when your time is done and you shut down your console you should be entertained (or is that you have been entertained?).

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
one big snip

That is true, I'll give you that. Personally, I hold to the idea that storytelling is the higher form, if you will, of video games. That games with little or no story are for nothing but entertainment, but the medium is defined by the ones that tell a great story. Again, similar to movies and books, where there are plenty out there that exist for reasons other than story; but the main purpose, gaming at its best, is as a form of literature. Due to this outlook, I would describe games as storytelling above all else, regardless of the fact that a story is not necessary required.

Hopefully I caught that before someone rips you a new one. That is afterall the point of movies, non fiction books (those are the unreal ones right I always confuse fiction and non fiction) and games. If they can make you think or teach you a life lesson then that is great. Your criteria for a great game is the story (and I am with you on that, a good story can save a crappy game for me). Although alot of other gamers are going to look for something different in a game. One might need great graphics to be happy. Another might need the killer gameplay (whatever that might be). There is so many aspects to gaming that we can't just say "it needs this to be good" which is why we have a variety to choose from. If you are looking for a deep story there is a game for you. If you want 2 lines of text and then blow shit up for the next 5 hours there is a game for you. Regardless though when your time is done and you shut down your console you should be entertained (or is that you have been entertained?).

Yes, Fiction is... well, fiction. Non-fiction is something that has actually happened.

I guess it's just that what you said is true for all art: it's subjective. People get out of it what they want out of it. But some specific types of art are still considered part of a certain "genre," if you will. Literature, for instance, is generally regarded as storytelling despite the fact that the term "literature" encompasses a heck of a lot more than that. So I guess, way I see it, that games can still be considered storytelling in general since, at the very least, stories have become standard in games at some level: be it Mario or Final Fantasy, there's still something there.

Really though, now that I think about it, describing gaming to someone who was completely unfamiliar with the concept would change depending on the person. If someone loved stories, you might explain it to them as interactive stories. If they like competitive sports, you might explain gaming as a competitive game. If they just like little time-wasters, you could just describe gaming as if it was a fun pastime.

Anyway...

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
one big snip

That is true, I'll give you that. Personally, I hold to the idea that storytelling is the higher form, if you will, of video games. That games with little or no story are for nothing but entertainment, but the medium is defined by the ones that tell a great story. Again, similar to movies and books, where there are plenty out there that exist for reasons other than story; but the main purpose, gaming at its best, is as a form of literature. Due to this outlook, I would describe games as storytelling above all else, regardless of the fact that a story is not necessary required.

Hopefully I caught that before someone rips you a new one. That is afterall the point of movies, non fiction books (those are the unreal ones right I always confuse fiction and non fiction) and games. If they can make you think or teach you a life lesson then that is great. Your criteria for a great game is the story (and I am with you on that, a good story can save a crappy game for me). Although alot of other gamers are going to look for something different in a game. One might need great graphics to be happy. Another might need the killer gameplay (whatever that might be). There is so many aspects to gaming that we can't just say "it needs this to be good" which is why we have a variety to choose from. If you are looking for a deep story there is a game for you. If you want 2 lines of text and then blow shit up for the next 5 hours there is a game for you. Regardless though when your time is done and you shut down your console you should be entertained (or is that you have been entertained?).

Yes, Fiction is... well, fiction. Non-fiction is something that has actually happened.

I guess it's just that what you said is true for all art: it's subjective. People get out of it what they want out of it. But some specific types of art are still considered part of a certain "genre," if you will. Literature, for instance, is generally regarded as storytelling despite the fact that the term "literature" encompasses a heck of a lot more than that. So I guess, way I see it, that games can still be considered storytelling in general since, at the very least, stories have become standard in games at some level: be it Mario or Final Fantasy, there's still something there.

Really though, now that I think about it, describing gaming to someone who was completely unfamiliar with the concept would change depending on the person. If someone loved stories, you might explain it to them as interactive stories. If they like competitive sports, you might explain gaming as a competitive game. If they just like little time-wasters, you could just describe gaming as if it was a fun pastime.

Anyway...

Except Tetris ;)

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:

squid5580:

Thaius:
one big snip

That is true, I'll give you that. Personally, I hold to the idea that storytelling is the higher form, if you will, of video games. That games with little or no story are for nothing but entertainment, but the medium is defined by the ones that tell a great story. Again, similar to movies and books, where there are plenty out there that exist for reasons other than story; but the main purpose, gaming at its best, is as a form of literature. Due to this outlook, I would describe games as storytelling above all else, regardless of the fact that a story is not necessary required.

Hopefully I caught that before someone rips you a new one. That is afterall the point of movies, non fiction books (those are the unreal ones right I always confuse fiction and non fiction) and games. If they can make you think or teach you a life lesson then that is great. Your criteria for a great game is the story (and I am with you on that, a good story can save a crappy game for me). Although alot of other gamers are going to look for something different in a game. One might need great graphics to be happy. Another might need the killer gameplay (whatever that might be). There is so many aspects to gaming that we can't just say "it needs this to be good" which is why we have a variety to choose from. If you are looking for a deep story there is a game for you. If you want 2 lines of text and then blow shit up for the next 5 hours there is a game for you. Regardless though when your time is done and you shut down your console you should be entertained (or is that you have been entertained?).

Yes, Fiction is... well, fiction. Non-fiction is something that has actually happened.

I guess it's just that what you said is true for all art: it's subjective. People get out of it what they want out of it. But some specific types of art are still considered part of a certain "genre," if you will. Literature, for instance, is generally regarded as storytelling despite the fact that the term "literature" encompasses a heck of a lot more than that. So I guess, way I see it, that games can still be considered storytelling in general since, at the very least, stories have become standard in games at some level: be it Mario or Final Fantasy, there's still something there.

Really though, now that I think about it, describing gaming to someone who was completely unfamiliar with the concept would change depending on the person. If someone loved stories, you might explain it to them as interactive stories. If they like competitive sports, you might explain gaming as a competitive game. If they just like little time-wasters, you could just describe gaming as if it was a fun pastime.

Anyway...

Except Tetris ;)

Sure, except Tetris. :P

 

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