So, now that the honeymoon period is over... (Skyrim thread)

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How are people's reaction to Skyrim these days. There's been a few big releases since Skyrim came out, so I'd like to know how OTHER people view it now.

To start it off, I'd like to say I didn't much care for the game. It felt too sterile and like I had no control over anything in this huge world who's very existence APPARENTLY relied solely on me. The characterization was nonexistant and the world was pretty generic (not to say it looked BAD. I have a 55in Plasma TV and the game LOOKED great). I also felt like the game was IMPOSSIBLE to roleplay in, the skill system kept me in a state of mind that I was ALWAYS playing a game. Need higher Blacksmithing? Better craft Iron Daggers for 2 hours. Need higher Barter? Better sell all those Iron Daggers I made ONE AT A TIME.

Don't get me wrong, I love open world games like this. New Vegas is one of my favorite games ever. But I just felt like going from New Vegas to Skyrim left me needing more if I wanted to roleplay in a game. In New Vegas, if I need higher Science or Lockpick, I level up, dump a bunch of points into it, then come back later. The characters are deep and diverse, even among their own small communities. In Skyrim, you can gauge the entire population of a huge city like Solitude by simply talking to the first person you talk to. I can't even DRESS how I want in Skyrim. I'm always looking for the next best armor or weapon. In Fallout, if I want to be a cowboy, I pick up a revolver, put on a duster and I look like a goddamn cowboy.

I will never say the game was "bad". But I will say the game had me snoring.

I still continue my love affair with Skyrim. I did prefer the leveling system in Fallout 3/NV but generally I'm not too incredibly focused on stats, even in Skyrim. I dress how I like, either in armour or whatever clothing I prefer.

It's still a place I want to be, just like Fallout 3. Bethesda even if it falls short on storytelling and interaction, their worlds are beautiful. (IMO)

It wasn`t my game either. I miss more narrative ( i know it`s an rpg but still) storytelling. Guess i`m not much of a roleplayer. By the way grinding is always a funkiller regardless of the genre.
I recently finished DE:hr and started to play ME2. Those games were/are much more fun, even if hardcore roleplayers don`t consider them as rpg.

Since i can only play it on my ps3 i must admit i`m a bit jealous of people with a gaming pc. Some of the mods seem pretty neat. I miss modding options on console games (the upcomming MP3 reminds me of the good ol`days).

None of the characters or factions seemed interesting and I just couldn't bring myself to give a shit about anyone or anything.

The opening part of the game alone was incredibly boring and the combat was stale to the point where every time I encountered an enemy I just sighed and mashed the attack button. Not to mention how often you get attacked by wolves and saber cats and every time the loud, obnoxious music starts playing made Skyrim the first game where I turned off the music.

Skyrim had a lot of flaws but I still rank it as a very good game. The game world is much shallower than I would like and as true with every Bethesda game, I don't care about a single character in the world. I don't think I've ever cared about any of their characters, their writing/voice acting/delivery is always too terrible.
I've improved the game a few times with mods and I still play it, and probably will play it for awhile but it definitely failed to deliver on a lot of my hopes but that is just the nature of things nowadays. Video games are often far too shallow for me partly due to how much they cost to make now.

Jitters Caffeine:
I can't even DRESS how I want in Skyrim. I'm always looking for the next best armor or weapon. In Fallout, if I want to be a cowboy, I pick up a revolver, put on a duster and I look like a goddamn cowboy.

And why is Skyrim any different? Want to look like a city guard, grab one of their armors. Want to run around in the Emperor's own robes? Just do it (once you find them). Sure, you will be penalized somewhat for doing it, but you are equally penalized by New Vegas if you don't use armor. Likewise with weapons, nothing is stopping you from going through the game with your first iron dagger, just like you could theoretically go through New Vegas with only your Varmint Rifle and lots of guts. Arguably, the latter is harder then iron daggering your way through Skyrim since the NV armor system means any weapon with a caliber below .44 is useless once you face super mutants, power armored enemies or high level NCR/Legion troops. It is also harder to use no armor/low DR armor because of said armor system.

I don't mean to sound rude or arrogant, but this seems to be a problem that's mostly rooted in your different approach to the two games and not in Skyrim itself. I like New Vegas a lot and to me it shares a spot with Skyrim as "best open world RPG of the 21st century (so far)". Because really, I thought Skyrim was great and I still think so. They managed to make a game that was both easily accesible and had quite some depth, thus combining the best of Oblivion (ease of access) and Morrowind (complexity in mechanics and richness of lore).

Gethsemani:

Jitters Caffeine:
I can't even DRESS how I want in Skyrim. I'm always looking for the next best armor or weapon. In Fallout, if I want to be a cowboy, I pick up a revolver, put on a duster and I look like a goddamn cowboy.

And why is Skyrim any different? Want to look like a city guard, grab one of their armors. Want to run around in the Emperor's own robes? Just do it (once you find them). Sure, you will be penalized somewhat for doing it, but you are equally penalized by New Vegas if you don't use armor. Likewise with weapons, nothing is stopping you from going through the game with your first iron dagger, just like you could theoretically go through New Vegas with only your Varmint Rifle and lots of guts. Arguably, the latter is harder then iron daggering your way through Skyrim since the NV armor system means any weapon with a caliber below .44 is useless once you face super mutants, power armored enemies or high level NCR/Legion troops. It is also harder to use no armor/low DR armor because of said armor system.

I don't mean to sound rude or arrogant, but this seems to be a problem that's mostly rooted in your different approach to the two games and not in Skyrim itself. I like New Vegas a lot and to me it shares a spot with Skyrim as "best open world RPG of the 21st century (so far)". Because really, I thought Skyrim was great and I still think so. They managed to make a game that was both easily accesible and had quite some depth, thus combining the best of Oblivion (ease of access) and Morrowind (complexity in mechanics and richness of lore).

You forget armor in New Vegas gives skill bonuses. Bonuses that USUALLY give benefits to a certain play style. Want higher Strength so you can use that Minigun and don't necessarily need Agility? Power Armor is the way to go. Want higher Agility and Small Guns so your Revolvers and Repeaters pack a little more punch? Grab a duster and be a Wasteland Cowboy. In Skyrim, I had zero attachment to any Armor, Weapon type, or aesthetic because of how unimmersive the game was. Sure you COULD just grab any armor you wanted with the highest DR, but if it was hard to find, you'd be fucked if it broke. So why not go with an armor that goes with the character you have that gives bonuses to the Skills you use the most AND looks good? I got rid of every piece of armor and every weapon I had in Skyrim if something better came along. But in New Vegas, I wanted to be a cowboy. So I stuck with the best Revolver I could find or which ever handled the best and completely passed up a high tech Plasma Rifle because that wasn't my character. Even if it DID do more damage.

And since you touched on the DR system and needing high caliber guns, did you forget about there being DIFFERENT types of ammo? You could even make your own. Armor Piercing for enemies with high DR, Hollow Point for enemies that don't, and regular ammo when I'm not feeling particularly fancy.

And I don't mean to sound rude, but making assumptions about people MAKES you sound arrogant.

ChupathingyX:
None of the characters or factions seemed interesting and I just couldn't bring myself to give a shit about anyone or anything.

The opening part of the game alone was incredibly boring and the combat was stale to the point where every time I encountered an enemy I just sighed and mashed the attack button. Not to mention how often you get attacked by wolves and saber cats and every time the loud, obnoxious music starts playing made Skyrim the first game where I turned off the music.

This was one of my BIGGEST issues with the game. There wasn't a single character I gave a shit about. They all just felt like cardboard cutouts waiting for the protagonist to show up so they could say their line of dialogue, give their fetch quest, or shout their ambient sounds into the air. In New Vegas, I cared if someone died. Because I had become attached to them. Especially my companions. If Veronica died, I would reload the game because I CARED about whether or not I saw the end of her personal story. Even at the cost of hours of gameplay. In Skyrim, if Lydia died? Fuck if I care. I'll just find another random NPC to carry the shit I plan on selling at the next town.

Jitters Caffeine:

Gethsemani:

Jitters Caffeine:
I can't even DRESS how I want in Skyrim. I'm always looking for the next best armor or weapon. In Fallout, if I want to be a cowboy, I pick up a revolver, put on a duster and I look like a goddamn cowboy.

And why is Skyrim any different? Want to look like a city guard, grab one of their armors. Want to run around in the Emperor's own robes? Just do it (once you find them). Sure, you will be penalized somewhat for doing it, but you are equally penalized by New Vegas if you don't use armor. Likewise with weapons, nothing is stopping you from going through the game with your first iron dagger, just like you could theoretically go through New Vegas with only your Varmint Rifle and lots of guts. Arguably, the latter is harder then iron daggering your way through Skyrim since the NV armor system means any weapon with a caliber below .44 is useless once you face super mutants, power armored enemies or high level NCR/Legion troops. It is also harder to use no armor/low DR armor because of said armor system.

I don't mean to sound rude or arrogant, but this seems to be a problem that's mostly rooted in your different approach to the two games and not in Skyrim itself. I like New Vegas a lot and to me it shares a spot with Skyrim as "best open world RPG of the 21st century (so far)". Because really, I thought Skyrim was great and I still think so. They managed to make a game that was both easily accesible and had quite some depth, thus combining the best of Oblivion (ease of access) and Morrowind (complexity in mechanics and richness of lore).

You forget armor in New Vegas gives skill bonuses. Bonuses that USUALLY give benefits to a certain play style. Want higher Strength so you can use that Minigun and don't necessarily need Agility? Power Armor is the way to go. Want higher Agility and Small Guns so your Revolvers and Repeaters pack a little more punch? Grab a duster and be a Wasteland Cowboy. In Skyrim, I had zero attachment to any Armor, Weapon type, or aesthetic because of how unimmersive the game was. Sure you COULD just grab any armor you wanted with the highest DR, but if it was hard to find, you'd be fucked if it broke. So why not go with an armor that goes with the character you have that gives bonuses to the Skills you use the most AND looks good? I got rid of every piece of armor and every weapon I had in Skyrim if something better came along. But in New Vegas, I wanted to be a cowboy. So I stuck with the best Revolver I could find or which ever handled the best and completely passed up a high tech Plasma Rifle because that wasn't my character. Even if it DID do more damage.

And since you touched on the DR system and needing high caliber guns, did you forget about there being DIFFERENT types of ammo? You could even make your own. Armor Piercing for enemies with high DR, Hollow Point for enemies that don't, and regular ammo when I'm not feeling particularly fancy.

And I don't mean to sound rude, but making assumptions about people MAKES you sound arrogant.

Perhaps so, but your argument is still kind of invalid because the stat boosts in NV were mostly negligable and most often not worth the trade off in DR if combat related. If they weren't combat related (like +1 CHA, +5 Speech from Sheriff's Duster or +10 Medicine from Wasteland Doctor Fatigues) then there's no reason why you just doesn't swap out when you need your stat boost. The ammo argument kind of makes sense, but only applies for high calibre guns still due to the fact that 9mm, 5,56mm, .357 and the other "early game" calibres still doesn't get high enough AP to allow you to go toe to toe with Deathclaws and Super Mutants.

Look, I am not saying you are wrong, because that is obviously highly subjective. I am just saying that your entire argument at its' core is basically "I didn't like Skyrim because it was unimmersive and because of that I doesn't like its' equipment". I see where you are coming from, and I personally found the apparel in NV to be far more intriguing than Skyrims, but the truth is that purely game mechanically speaking there's very little difference between NV and Skyrim when it comes to equipment. Both push you towards high end gear but Skyrim is far less in your face about forcing upgrades then NV is due to a more forgiving armor and damage system.

Gethsemani:

Perhaps so, but your argument is still kind of invalid because the stat boosts in NV were mostly negligable and most often not worth the trade off in DR if combat related. If they weren't combat related (like +1 CHA, +5 Speech from Sheriff's Duster or +10 Medicine from Wasteland Doctor Fatigues) then there's no reason why you just doesn't swap out when you need your stat boost. The ammo argument kind of makes sense, but only applies for high calibre guns still due to the fact that 9mm, 5,56mm, .357 and the other "early game" calibres still doesn't get high enough AP to allow you to go toe to toe with Deathclaws and Super Mutants.

Look, I am not saying you are wrong, because that is obviously highly subjective. I am just saying that your entire argument at its' core is basically "I didn't like Skyrim because it was unimmersive and because of that I doesn't like its' equipment". I see where you are coming from, and I personally found the apparel in NV to be far more intriguing than Skyrims, but the truth is that purely game mechanically speaking there's very little difference between NV and Skyrim when it comes to equipment. Both push you towards high end gear but Skyrim is far less in your face about forcing upgrades then NV is due to a more forgiving armor and damage system.

For skill boosts like +5 in Guns, or +10 Speech, you're right. They're mostly negligible unless you were making a skill check in dialogue or needed to hack a computer or open a safe. But when it comes to things like +2 to Strength, guns have a required Strength and Skill requirement to use them effectively. If I need 8 Strength and 100 Guns to use that shiny new Minigun you found on that Super Mutant, then having Power Armor that pushes you over that threshhold will encourage you to use that over something that gives you a bonus to Sneak. But those checks are something else I really like about the Fallout series. Completely skipping what could be a very difficult encounter with several armed thugs by complimenting his prized Revolver makes you REALLY glad you put those points in Guns instead of Energy Weapons. You feel like you've accomplished something.

But you are correct, it IS a very subjective argument. I personally felt the game to be incredibly unimmersive, the characters to be nonengaging, and the world to be a very "standard fantasy" affair. The way the "big sandbox RPG romp through a giant video game world" was handled better in the Fallout series.

I absolutely adored skyrim. Although I couldn't stop making new characters and didn't finish it. So I just gave it to one of my friends....... and now I want it back. There will be blood.

I played for roughly 30 hours and I haven't bothered to pick it back up again in months. I haven't even bothered finishing the main quest yet.

When I don't want to play a game even to just finish the main storyline then something's definitely gone wrong.

Still only halfway through it, I started on it late, get distracted occasionally, but still intend to see it through to the end, and probably peek into every cave i can find before i put it to rest. STEAM has me clockd at 115 hours, i expect that to double.

played 4-5 hours
gave up

Dull combat, drab colourless world, dull storyline. Nothing here for me.

What!? A Skyrim thread? YOUR KIND IS NOT WELCOME HERE ANYMORE!

OT: I'm still having fun with Skyrim. I made a few characters so it can suit all my preferred playstyles so I can somewhat play it no matter what kind of gaming mood I'm in. Admittedly, I'm starting to take more breaks from my sessions to play other things like Deus Ex, Marvel VS Capcom 3 and Team Fortress 2 but that's par for the course if I play any game for too long.

Lucem712:
I still continue my love affair with Skyrim. I did prefer the leveling system in Fallout 3/NV but generally I'm not too incredibly focused on stats, even in Skyrim. I dress how I like, either in armour or whatever clothing I prefer.

It's still a place I want to be, just like Fallout 3. Bethesda even if it falls short on storytelling and interaction, their worlds are beautiful. (IMO)

I'd say the skill system in Skyrim was the biggest wall that kept me from truly enjoying the game to it's fullest. It was a door that blocked my every effort to roleplay to any extent. I always FELT like I was playing a game. I was just so unimmerssed in the experience when in my mind all I could think about was "I should really grind up my Smithing some more so I can upgrade my armor before I take on that next fortress of Bandits"

bahumat42:
played 4-5 hours
gave up

Dull combat, drab colourless world, dull storyline. Nothing here for me.

That's why I compare it to the Fallout series, New Vegas in particular. The combat was fun because there was always the threat of enemies fighting in MANY different styles and distances. You always have to be prepared to deal with someone with Handguns, Rifles, Melee weapons, and Explosives. In Skyrim it's either a guy with a sword running at you or a guy with a Bow/Magic backpeddling away from you while you run at him. The world may have been brown, but that was kind of the point. It's the end of the world baby, now let's rebuild. In fallout 3, you had bombed out buildings and huge dilapidated monuments to explore. In Skyrim, you've got a European castle, a cave, a Village, then another goddamn cave. In Fallout, the world is so bleak, find any kind of settlement felt like a light at the end of a tunnel after running across the wastes. In Skyrim, finding another settlement just means another shop to sell all the shit you found and a few more fetch quests. The story in New Vegas isn't the best, but Fallout 3 had a GREAT story. You leave the only home you've ever known to find your dad who left under mysterious circumstances, only to find out a lot of the things he's told you is a lie. Then he dies in front of you, and you spend the rest of the game trying to see his and your Mother's dream come true. Life for a dying wasteland. In skyrim, you're a prisoner who was captured for reasons that are never explained and are forced into a conflict you have no stake in all because of a prophecy you're never told. Kind of pales in comparison.

I'm still playing it and that doesn't happen often. It's a shame the world is so shallow and particularly there are no characters in it and there are all manner of tweaks and changes I'd like to make when the mods come. But I keep coming back because of how broad it is, at any one time there are dozens of leads and plot threads for me to investigate, even if they are individually quite shallow the whole feels very interesting.

I think it's a great game, I played 125 hours. One aspect that maybe isn't praised enough is the sound production, the music and sound effects by themselves go a long way towards immersion, for me. I mostly avoid fast travel, I use a horse, and constantly stop to smell the roses on my way doing quests.

I agree that the skill system can be distracting, I preferred the system in Fallout 3 / NV as well. In Skyrim I just went "full roleplayer" and didn't worry about skills, wore leather armor throughout the game, etc.

Still think it is one if not the best example for hype can make money and will buy your game the Game of the Year award. Reasons below.

There is something missing. There is that spark that both Morrowind and Oblivion had, and Skyrim lacks it. Skyrim hasn't lasted me nearly as long.

It just feels so...empty. At least in Oblivion, you felt a sense of urgency in the world around you because of the pesky gates. Yes the story was terrible, but it filled the landscape with something . Skyrim just left me a bit cold, simply underwhelmed.

It's quite easily the blandest game I've ever played.

The lore additions were nice, though.

Aprilgold:
Still think it is one if not the best example for hype can make money and will buy your game the Game of the Year award. Reasons below.

I agree with pretty much every point you have there friend, but I still wouldn't go so far as to say the game was painful to play. It was boring, sure. But you'll find me in the Mojave or the Capital Waste WAY before you'd ever find me in Tamriel.

For me it was the lack of choices within the quests.

In New Vegas nearly every quest could end in several different ways, but in Skyrim your choices are limited to either "do it" or "don't do it".

The whole world of Skyrim itself also felt like a beautifully constructed maquette; It was highly detailed, but it lacked any sense of life. This was again a result of the game not allowing much choice in how you interacted with the world.

I miss the old ES equipment system. Where you could equip your armor piece by piece and then blend with other armours. Oblivion and Skyrim could have benefitted from this as it gives more customizability and choice. Something that is becoming less and less available in the ES games.

Skyrim is decent. If you find mods you like. The story is uninvolving. The game lacks alot of "neutral" stances on big in-game issues.

Jitters Caffeine:
I also felt like the game was IMPOSSIBLE to roleplay in, the skill system kept me in a state of mind that I was ALWAYS playing a game. Need higher Blacksmithing? Better craft Iron Daggers for 2 hours. Need higher Barter? Better sell all those Iron Daggers I made ONE AT A TIME.

I think this right here was your problem. Typically, the people who love the games (for it applies to all TES games) most are those of us who are able to just focus on doing what we want and, more or less, let our skills take care of themselves. I literally just stopped playing before posting, and I honestly don't know what any of my skill levels are. I know my sneak is at 100, and my archery and one handed are somewhere between 65 and 75, but aside from that, no idea.

The problem is, a lot of people aren't able to just let go like that, or they don't want to. They're constantly trying to maximize profit from dungeon diving (i.e. loading up, going back to sell, going to another city to sell once the merchants in the first city run out, going back to pick up more gear, repeat), or planning their characters out from level 1 to 50. And that's fine. I've always said TES games aren't for everyone.

But if you are interested in seeing how those of us who love it play, you need to let go of a lot of habits.

Here are a couple tips:

1. Never plan your character's skills/perks beyond the next couple of levels. If you plan too far ahead you're just going to get bored because you resort to grinding to get to the perks/levels you want.

2. Fast travel sparingly. The game world is beautiful and expansive, give yourself the chance to enjoy it.

3. Don't over-optimize your equipment. Swapping out weapons and armor is fine and a good idea, but don't be afraid to use sub par gear if you think it looks better or fits the character better.

4. Adjust the difficulty anytime you want. I typically play all my characters on Adept (default) when they first start, but then bump it up to Expert when they get strong enough. This helps the game have some challenge without forcing me to cheat the system at all.

5. Pick a personality for your character. This could also include a backstory, aspirations, etc. Stick to this as much as possible. I find I have more fun with characters if I'm not afraid to turn down some quests they wouldn't take because of their personality. For example, the character I was playing earlier is Master of the Thieves guild and slightly vain, so she doesn't take delivery quests or other menial tasks. She thinks its beneath her.

Again, Skyrim, and TES games in general, aren't for everyone. If you're not able to, or simply have no interest in, simply letting go and playing the character you won't really like it. Simple as that.

Casual Shinji:
For me it was the lack of choices within the quests.

In New Vegas nearly every quest could end in several different ways, but in Skyrim your choices are limited to either "do it" or "don't do it".

The whole world of Skyrim itself also felt like a beautifully constructed maquette; It was highly detailed, but it lacked any sense of live. This was again a result of the game not allowing much choice in how you interacted with the world.

Very much this. I felt like the game wanted me to look and appreciate it rather that play it. I was told the very world rested on my shoulders and my ability to slay dragons. But the world seemed to ignore me entirely and that I had no real influence at all. The game had a very "look but don't touch" attitude towards me, like a museum. Unfortunately, it was a very boring museum.

Jitters Caffeine:

Casual Shinji:
For me it was the lack of choices within the quests.

In New Vegas nearly every quest could end in several different ways, but in Skyrim your choices are limited to either "do it" or "don't do it".

The whole world of Skyrim itself also felt like a beautifully constructed maquette; It was highly detailed, but it lacked any sense of live. This was again a result of the game not allowing much choice in how you interacted with the world.

Very much this. I felt like the game wanted me to look and appreciate it rather that play it. I was told the very world rested on my shoulders and my ability to slay dragons. But the world seemed to ignore me entirely and that I had no real influence at all. The game had a very "look but don't touch" attitude towards me, like a museum. Unfortunately, it was a very boring museum.

Also, after a certain time leveling up falls dead in it's track.

Seeing as the game only levels when you use a skill and not when you defeat an enemy or finish a quest, once the main skills you've been using reach 100 leveling literally stops. You can ofcourse try and use other skills, but why would I use my weak one-handed attacks for the sake of leveling when I can kill a giant with 3 shots of my bow?

Krantos:

Here are a couple tips:

1. Never plan your character's skills/perks beyond the next couple of levels. If you plan too far ahead you're just going to get bored because you resort to grinding to get to the perks/levels you want.

2. Fast travel sparingly. The game world is beautiful and expansive, give yourself the chance to enjoy it.

3. Don't over-optimize your equipment. Swapping out weapons and armor is fine and a good idea, but don't be afraid to use sub par gear if you think it looks better or fits the character better.

4. Adjust the difficulty anytime you want. I typically play all my characters on Adept (default) when they first start, but then bump it up to Expert when they get strong enough. This helps the game have some challenge without forcing me to cheat the system at all.

5. Pick a personality for your character. This could also include a backstory, aspirations, etc. Stick to this as much as possible. I find I have more fun with characters if I'm not afraid to turn down some quests they wouldn't take because of their personality. For example, the character I was playing earlier is Master of the Thieves guild and slightly vain, so she doesn't take delivery quests or other menial tasks. She thinks its beneath her.

Again, Skyrim, and TES games in general, aren't for everyone. If you're not able to, or simply have no interest in, simply letting go and playing the character you won't really like it. Simple as that.

1. I can plan out my character in a Fallout game from 1 to 60 and still have fun because of how easy it is to roleplay a character. I can choose an aesthetic and play that way. I can choose the weapons I want, the clothes I cant, and even the dialogue options I want that would fit the character I want to play. In Skyrim, all I'm doing is looking for the next best weapons and armor.

2. I already fast-travel sparsely. In the Hardcore mode in New Vegas, fast-traveling too far would leave you deathly dehydrated, starving, and dying from exhaustion. Not something you want to be hit with if you pop up with a Legionaire Assassin squad staring you down.

3. Over-Optimizing was the only thing I could find that felt like any king of progress.

4. I moved the difficulty around quite a bit. Mostly when a dragon would show up, because I knew fighting the scaley bastard on Expert would be like 15 minutes of watching him circle me in the sky because I had the audacity to play a melee character.

5. Making a backstory for a character in Skyrim felt incredibly pointless to me because of how unimmersive the game was. I don't even get to TALK to the people I'm supposedly fighting a war with despite being the only thing keeping a horde from slaughtering the inhabitants withing the city.

A big issue I have is how little the game seems to care about the Player or the characters they're supposed to interact with. They're just people shaped speakers waiting for the protagonist to stumble by on their next loot-selling romp so they can speak their few lines of dialogue, give out their fetch quest, or shout some ambient sounds to fake a living world that's really just a sterile lab full of pretty pictures.

Uninstalled. Reported. Called the cops. Etc.

It's empty. The greatest character in the game is the landscape, and it's not a warm companion. The NPCs are as barren as those endless, brown, craggy steppes in Morrowind. The most fun that can be had in Skyrim is using the console to fill Whiterun with cabbages. Once you've done that, there's really nothing else left.

I doubt I'll ever play it again. I'm still sinking a few months annually into Baldur's Gate. I just wish there'd been a lot more of THIS in THAT.

Casual Shinji:

Jitters Caffeine:

Casual Shinji:
For me it was the lack of choices within the quests.

In New Vegas nearly every quest could end in several different ways, but in Skyrim your choices are limited to either "do it" or "don't do it".

The whole world of Skyrim itself also felt like a beautifully constructed maquette; It was highly detailed, but it lacked any sense of live. This was again a result of the game not allowing much choice in how you interacted with the world.

Very much this. I felt like the game wanted me to look and appreciate it rather that play it. I was told the very world rested on my shoulders and my ability to slay dragons. But the world seemed to ignore me entirely and that I had no real influence at all. The game had a very "look but don't touch" attitude towards me, like a museum. Unfortunately, it was a very boring museum.

Also, after a certain time leveling up falls dead in it's track.

Seeing as the game only levels when you use a skill and not when you defeat an enemy or finish a quest, once the main skills you've been using reach 100 leveling literally stops. You can ofcourse try and use other skills, but why would I use my weak one-handed attacks for the sake of leveling when I can kill a giant with 3 shots of my bow?

The skill system was far too "grindy" for me. Need higher Heavy Armor? "Better find a bandit or a wolf to kick the shit out of me for a while I through back health potions like a freshman on nickel beer night." If i need a higher skill in a Fallout game? Dump some points in it on your next level up and move on.

I got a sort of burnout in the first week or so, but I'd still say it's great. While features like to combat or story don't excel over any games, it's probably still the best Elder Scrolls game I've played. Great game, not fantastic, but I'd rather play it over many others.

hazabaza1:
I got a sort of burnout in the first week or so, but I'd still say it's great. While features like to combat or story don't excel over any games, it's probably still the best Elder Scrolls game I've played. Great game, not fantastic, but I'd rather play it over many others.

I can respect that. But you'll always find me in wandering the Wasteland LONG before you'll see me step foot in Tamriel again.

I honestly haven't touched it for about a month.

Though as a disclaimer to that, the Honeymoon period was one of the best I've had with any game I've gotten. The world was incredibly beautiful, and it was pretty crazy to see the different merging of various winter biomes.

The only reason I really couldn't stay invested in it is because I pretty much did everything, or at least the basics of everything. That, and the cities. They really weren't that engaging. I think making a few of the smaller ones a bit bigger would have been nifty.

Aprilgold:
Still think it is one if not the best example for hype can make money and will buy your game the Game of the Year award. Reasons below.

Prepare for some spine ripping. Would it make you angry if I said that I disagree with almost everything you said here?

Combat was fun, provided you mix it up and don't shoehorn yourself into one class. I played a bit of everything, and had a good time.

Colors? That "different shades of gray" argument is getting weak. The land is based off of a Tundra. As in, there's gonna be snow everywhere, being set in a very mountain heavy world. And to that, I still think it's one of the most beautiful games out there. The caves being a little samey? Sure, I'd give you that one.

Real Wordly? I really don't know what to make with this one. I guess look above to the colors argument. It tried to convey a gritty and harsh world. Not everything can be World of Warcraft.

I'm not much of a Role Player, but from the sounds of it you're the only one who had this problem. The amount of Role Playing threads would contest to that.

Wasn't stealth the easiest thing to use? I think that goes hand in hand with not shoehorning yourself into one class role.

And once again, I played a hybrid of just about everything. I flat out just disagree with that. In fact, that was the whole point of the leveling system for this game, in order to get people to try and not just play as a pure mage, or a pure archer.

Bad writing? Sure, I guess. To the point of where I cared for very few characters, I absolutely agree with that. It wasn't horrendous, and got the job done. But the Accents? The accents were fucking awesome. I will fight you to the death for that. I think they're what saved the shitty writing.

And finally, good for you. It's not impressive to say a games gonna suck before it even comes out. In fact, it's obnoxious. And you shouldn't be bragging about that.

Got my platinum, and had been in a vast majority of the dungeons, since two weeks after it was released and haven't played it since. Itching a bit to start it up again, but I got lots of other games to play.
The framerate issues kind of keep me from diving into it another time. Not sure if they've fixed it now or not.

Jitters Caffeine:

hazabaza1:
I got a sort of burnout in the first week or so, but I'd still say it's great. While features like to combat or story don't excel over any games, it's probably still the best Elder Scrolls game I've played. Great game, not fantastic, but I'd rather play it over many others.

I can respect that. But you'll always find me in wandering the Wasteland LONG before you'll see me step foot in Tamriel again.

To be honest, I really want to get back into New Vegas, but I got it fully on steam, and it's big bloody download, so I've just been putting it off.
WHOOPS.

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