The Wii's life is almost over, what are your concluding thoughts?

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The name still sucks.

But then again we now have the Wii U to look forward to...>>

Did you like Nintendo's direction?
Can motion controls be the future of gaming?
Did the lacking specs affect your opinion of it?
Despite its setbacks, where the exclusives up to standard?
Did you own one?
Overall, what are your opinions on it?

No
No
Yes
No its exclusives pretty much sucked.
Yes
I think it is pretty much the console version of Mario. It sucked but people bought it because it had Nintendos name on and they worship the ground Nintendo works on despite them barely changing anything in their games before releasing it as a sequel.

Super smash brothers was all right but again, not much different from the other two. The rest of the games either sucked or were good for a few minutes before you got over them because Nintendo relies of gimmicks rather then quality.
I can't think of a single game on the Wii or made by Nintendo ever that would top Minecraft, Bastion or Terraria yet they still manage to charge full prices for the same game the released years ago with updated graphics and two extra mushrooms.

Mine is wasted potential.

Metroid Prime 3 is amazing. I have Skyward Sword sitting on the waiting list after I kick off a few RPGs. Okami is amazing, though it was a PS2 game first. I want to see the original filter that the game had. It's inferior in that regard, but it's not that important. There's nothing else I have that's worth playing on it.

SSBB is broken online and honestly doesn't feel as solid as Melee (tripping?). Animal Crossing was fun for a good while, but I couldn't keep it up. Borrowed Super Mario Galaxy and loved it. I wanted Paper Mario, Muramasa, and a couple things from Virtual Console but never got them.

The motion controls worked for Metroid and I expect them to for Skyward Sword. They were acceptable for Okami. I didn't care much either way about the hardware specs, but I feel that games ported onto the Wii were inferior to their PS360 counterparts because of tacked on motion controls and/or simplification of the game because the machine couldn't handle it.

I thought it was a great idea for a few months, but you know what games I played on it the most? Excite Truck and the original Super Mario Bros.

I stopped using it around the time Mario Kart came out, never bought a single Metroid or Zelda game... I guess I missed the point of owning a Nintendo console. At the end of the day, I preferred my 360, so I got rid of the Wii and never looked back.

Not even going to consider a Wii U.

Electrogecko:

rob_simple:
The analog stick was a functional improvement because navigating a 3D space with a d-pad wasn't nearly as fluid. The mouse is a functional improvement because it improves things like aiming in FPS's and unit selection in RTS's. Motion controls in the current generation are just a gimmick because they don't even work properly in most of the games they're used in. Sure some games make them work (although I've never played one that didn't have at least one counter-intuitive motion), but for the most part they're just used as bells and whistles to hide the fact that Nintendo haven't innovated any actual in-game content in the last thirty odd years.

Wow.

Yes, the analogue stick was a functional improvement.....over 15 years ago.

And the mouse was certainly a revolutionary interfacing tool.....in the 60s.

Now Nintendo, in 2006, is the first to put a fricken pointer on their controller, and far from people saying "Gee, we finally got a pointer! What the hell took them so long?" there are some "hardcore gamers" who dismiss the whole thing as a gimmick?

It's a goddamn pointer! How can it be a gimmick? Seriously!?

In this era of app gaming, I'd wager more people are playing games with touchscreens and motion controls then gamepads or mouses. When making games for the iPhone, devs have to make key decisions in design to accommodate for the controls, and the games have been made more unique because of it. I shouldn't even need to list any; just think of how dumb playing a simple game like Labyrinth would be with anything but a gyroscope.

My argument is that until we have neural interfacing, games are going to be controlled by motion, and it doesn't take a genius to realize that just about anything is more sophisticated than a bunch of buttons all over the place. If a mouse controls in two dimensions than a slider controls in 1 and a button controls in......binary. I don't know about you, but I want to use as many degrees of control that my body can muster.....I'm still hoping to see a semblance of virtual reality in my lifetime.

It'll always be up to the developers to decide how they want their games to be played......hopefully. And just like how Jim Sterling doesn't endorse a blanket ban on cutscenes, nobody, including me, should propose one on any type of control. You can argue that current motion controls are useless and, beside the point, that Nintendo games aren't innovative.....categorically untrue as those arguments may seem to me, but I really don't think there's any denying that motion controls are the future, and if it's not now it's only a matter of time.

The difference is that my examples were functional, motion controls at present are frivolous and don't work properly most of the time, that is a truth I have proved empirically with every Wii game I own.

I agree with you that they have a place in gaming (I don't think it should be limited to any one method of control and, yes, I'm hoping for some form of VR in my time too) but what I object to is the way they're currently being rammed down our throats.I prefer motion control games that give you the option to turn the motion control off, so that when I want to just lie on the couch and vegetate with a game I can do that.

So, in Ratchet & Clank I could disable the six-axis flight controls and just use the analogue stick. In Metroid Prime 3 though, (and that was a game I loved) if I want to play it, I have to be swinging controllers around, twisting this and pulling that and sometimes I just don't want to do that; it's creating barriers to play. The other objection I have to the Wii in particular is that, as Yahtzee pointed out years ago, it's pretty much limited to swords and guns.

This example will be shaky but try and stay with me on it: When I want to jump in a traditional game, I press X or A and I jump. That's it, no confusions or complications. When I want to jump in WiiFit, however, I have to bend my knees and then jump without my feet leaving the balance board. It's completely counter-intuitive to everything that jumping is. On the other hand: take those occasions in Dead Space when you got covered by those bullshit bugs that killed you in seconds; you furiously tap one button to get them off. That's dumb. If, instead, you used motion controls and waved your hand around like your were wiping them off, that'd be pretty cool.

I think motion controls can be a part of gaming but they shouldn't be the single core element because, with the best will in the world, they're never going to be as accurate as the precision afforded by a traditional controller.

Why is it that everyone exaggerates motion controls beyond relief? I don't know many games where you 'Swing' or 'Wave' your controller around, and I know for a fact that isn't the case in Metroid, Zelda or well, any of the good games for the system!

I didnt care for the Wii (mostly because I think motion controls are the bane of my existance...), but I give it props. It dominated the market, that is an inarguable fact. It tapped a market that neither Sony or Microsoft thought to go for, and which really only Facebook and iPhone/iPad games are catering towards.

Course, I have a hard time believing Nintendo could pull that off a second time with the WiiU, but that is a discussion for another time.

I think it was a waste of time on a dead end branch of gaming technology. Motion control of the kind being employed presently adds more delay between thought and in-game response, which is about as bad of a thing as you can get.

Overall, another satisfactory console from Nintendo.

Though in the first two years or so of its life, the big N did seem to focus more on the mini game collections and tech demos rather than actual quality games. It did make for a rather lackluster beginning, but they recovered from it.

MaxiP62:
however in its twilight hours; what are your thoughts on the white little box?

Honestly, my thoughts are exactly what I thought of it when I first played one 6 years ago. But we'll go through them in your questions instead.

Did you like Nintendo's direction?

No. I didn't like it at release and I still don't like it now. Motion control without any physical feedback is inaccurate and not worth the effort for the sort of games I play. I can see the appeal for casual users, but there's nowhere for motion controls as implemented by the Wii to go from there. Moreover, I do feel Nintendo has put themselves in an awkward position. They all but abandoned the core gamers so they and third parties could pursue casual gamers. That's all well and good when you're the only game in town. Now the casual market includes smartphones, tablets, facebook games, and anything else I'm forgetting here. They don't just have competition now, they have a saturated market. Which begs the question of what they should do? Continue to pursue a casual market that has no loyalty to them and is spoiled for choice, or try to get the core gamers they hung out to dry back and compete directly with Sony and Microsoft again. They're lucky they have plenty of cash because I think they've forced themselves into a position where things are going to get rough.

Can motion controls be the future of gaming?

No, absolutely not. Again, without physical feedback it will never be as accurate, and will definitely never be as fast as other control methods. So where do you go with it? It's fine for more casual titles or party games, but it's utterly not a good choice for anything else where precision and speed matter like an FPS, platformer, fighting game, etc. It opens up very few new possibilities of any interest, and is at best complementary to traditional controls. They can certainly co-exist, but motion controls can't become the defacto standard because they simply can't do what traditional inputs do well.

Did the lacking specs affect your opinion of it?

Not at all. Honestly, many of my favourite games are PS2 era and earlier. Good specs are nice. They can open up possibilities for truly revolutionary stuff and new gameplay (like sandbox games as one example), but I also recognize that games using the best technology are getting prohibitively expensive and harder to develop for all but the largest triple A teams. Very few companies can afford to pursue AAA development and do it well. Having cheaper options for developer and consumer is good for the industry, and in time, the higher end stuff can filter down to the smaller developers as technology continues to progress and tools improve.

Despite its setbacks, where the exclusives up to standard?

I honestly can't name many exclusives made by Nintendo which weren't Mario 64 or Ocarina of Time all over again. Usually they weren't as good though. I found both Mario Galaxies rather tedious, I didn't enjoy Twilight Princess at all and actually just stopped playing after a few dungeons because I was so bored. Metroid Other M was pretty terrible, Mario Kart Wii is hands down one of the worst games I've ever played, and I never cared for the first two Smash Bros. games, and Brawl was no different. I haven't really cared for many Nintendo exclusives since the N64 days and most play like they've run out of ideas and are just reliving their greatest hits. There were some decent to good third party exclusives, but they're too few and far between.

Did you own one?

My sister bought one not long after release so I was able to play most of the titles that seemed interesting or reviewed well for the first few years. Her fiancee also had a Wii so now she gave hers to my wife since they don't need two. Suffice it to say I've had ready access to one for most of it's life and have given it more than a fair shake and tried quite a few titles.

Overall, what are your opinions on it?

My opinion is probably pretty obvious by now. It's a system that wasn't made to appeal to me, and unsurprisingly it didn't appeal to me. I also feel like Nintendo went in with one idea to set them apart, made a lot of money from it, but I don't see where they had any clear path to take it. The fact that the WiiU is basically trying to ape tablet technology kind of confirms that for me too.

And the irony is that I'm fully ready to admit that I was fairly excited to see it before release too. I was curious about the new possibilities that motion control could offer just like everyone else. But once I played it I just didn't see any possibilities beyond being a novel way to play more casual games. Sadly, nothing since then has really convinced me otherwise.

The idea was good, but horribly executed. I had major problems getting a good experience when I failed because of the motion control. I donīt think motion control is going to last.

I think it was a gimmick that was never supported by good games.

Visually, it was horrible to look at. When you can't even make a Guitar Hero game look decent, you're doing something wrong.

Im one of those guys who grew up in the 80's where Nintendo was the system to have. It was really important in my formative years and remained so up till I became a teenager. As a kid we came up with challenges to our friends. There were even "impossible" feats that we strived to conquer (like in Mega man 2 heat man's level my friend swore it was impossible to get to him without the jet sled power. I proved them wrong). So I think its fair to say Nintendo has a lot of good will built up with me since they provided me with almost 2 decades of gaming awesomeness

I never really played the N64 except for some golden eye and perfect dark. I loved zelda but I didnt even play that past the first hour because I didnt care for the reboot (up until that point Zelda was a group of prequel's or sequels that continued links journey).

It was when I got my PS1 (I was 18 at the time) that I realized that selection is king for me. I like all kinds of different games and having a wide selection really helps to keep a system favorable in my eyes. I lost touch with Nintendo in the years later because they just never seemed to call to me anymore. I stuck with my PS1 and then got my PS2 when I was 19, I think

It would be a few years later that I happened upon a cheap gamecube at a garage sale and I picked it up. Problem was there were so few games for the thing that I enjoyed. I remember smash bros brawl was something I played constantly but more because my friends did and I also really enjoyed Metriod prime (another series I loved but hadnt been touched since the SNES) and I also remember a game called metal storm or something like that where you were a robot in a subterranian robot area, I dont remember much from it besides really enjoying it.

Then the Wii came out and Im really not sure what to say about the lack of games it has. Ive borrowed and rented a ton of wii games but the newest smash bros was lackluster at best and I didnt enjoy the Zelda's at all (again Im still dont care for this constant rebooting rather then a continued hero's journey). The only game that I really liked was Monster hunter 3 and that really had no business being on the Wii because the hardware usually couldnt handle the games graphics. Again, selection is king for me and the Wii just doesnt have it

The Wii has other problems though, the hardware is for a last generation console. Current generation consoles have hardware that's 7 years old but the Wii's isnt even that good. The motion controls were a good idea but without force feedback they are a dead end. As is I think the Wii is not a good system because the motion controls are often crap (especially for the first few years) and there really aren't any games I enjoy on it. It is perhaps the worst system Ive bought this generation but then between my time as a teenager and my early 20's I became a PC gamer so I tend to be disappointed by consoles a lot. Still, for me, I keep thinking of that lack of selection of games I like and honestly I keep questioning why we dont have monster hunter or a similar game on PC or even all the consoles and PC

i've loved and grew up with Nintendo almost all my life, playing Mario games when i was like 4 but Wii...i own a Wii...and seriously the only games i have on that damn thing is N64, Snes and Nes games, i rented/borrowed games and all of them sucked terribly for the motion controls. i am so sad i loathed Skyward Sword, its a good game but the bloody motion controls ughk, just give me a GC controller and i'd play that game happily. i tried liking motion controls but for me, its in the way its not immersive what so ever IMO. * sad sigh * i wish they had the option like in Brawl, there's 4 different ways to play that bloody game. if they had that option for every wii game or at least the big title ones they'd get my money again. oh well

I purchased my first console in many years and didn't even use for the majority of its life-cycle because it didn't fit in my luggage.

Nomanslander:
The name still sucks.

Not to the Japanese. Product names that require modern writing conventions to express are cool. As is the cheerful, squeeish "ee" sound. Like it or not, larger or not it may be, the West is still perceived as a secondary market.

i have one. only got it cause it was cheap. i only have Nintendo games for it too. NSMB, SSBB, LoZTP etc

They promised me motion controls. I got lack of controls. Then they asked an extra $20 a controller to fix it. (but it didn't fix it that well. It sucked me into buying one only to realize it was a trap. Everyone I know owns one. Nobody plays one (expect for younger relatives of these people that are 12 and under).

It was a game cube with motion controls. Sorry if I wanted a new gen console.

I love the Wii, since it's the only 7th generation game that can be emulated on good PC's. Who knows when Xbox and PS3 games will be emulatable, it probably won't be for quite some time.

It's got some really fun games, like Xenoblade Chronicles, Skyward Sword, and some other gems.

Not a big nintendo fan, but I do have a couple of games for the Wii, Kirby: Return to Dreamland, and No More Heroes 2 I thought were really good. So yeah, games that didn't use the motion controls were alright with me I guess?

The Wii wasn't aimed at me. It wans't aimed at anyone in the core market.

Almost any game released upon it which I found even modestly interesting would have worked a lot better on a another format.

The Wii brought more people into gaming, which is fine.

However, it was never in the same league as the PS3 or Xbox.

And it never touched the Xbox or PS3's market, yes, a lot of them sold, but, in terms of game sales? Maybe the occasional success, but, it had nothing of the spread the main consoles do.

Given that console manufacturers earn money from each game sale,I can only really imagine that Sony and Microsoft got a lot more out of this generation than Nintendo did.

All I can really say about the Wii is that it's good that somebody made a console people can use as a stepping stone to get into the more dedicated gaming experiences.

Did you like Nintendo's direction?
No. A mix of shovelware and franchises like Mario and Zelda isn't attracting me.

Can motion controls be the future of gaming?
Not when they're done THAT way.*

Did the lacking specs affect your opinion of it?
Yes. Whenever we talked about "next-gen-consoles" the Wii simply wasn't worth to be mentioned next to the PS3 and the 360. I mean come on. I'm not begging for Ultra-Mega-HD graphics, but not even having HD at all is a shame.

Despite its setbacks, where the exclusives up to standard?
As I already said. Mario, Zelda, Donkey Kong and Metroid are franchises I don't like and it makes me angry to see that Nintendo does nothing new. It would be biased, so I just give no answer to this question.

Did you own one?
Informed myself, tested the Wii at a friends house and decided that it's nothing for me.

Overall, what are your opinions on it?
Motion controls are nice for partygames but nothing more. Now, thanks to Nintendo's Wii, every damn console has it and pushes it into "hardcore-games". The idea was nice, but the Wii was a disappointment for me.

*Am I the only one who thinks that the Sixaxis controller of the PS3 is the only type of motioncontrol that doesn't suck? Moving the controller a bit is like another set of buttons. You don't have to stand up and jump across the room for decent motioncontrols. So how to improve motioncontrols? Make the sixaxis more accurate and use it when it's a good situation in a game or don't use it at all.

MaxiP62:

Did you like Nintendo's direction?

Personally, no. It felt overwhelmingly child/casual gamer focussed (as opposed to child/casual gamer friendly, which I feel is to be encouraged. There is no real depth to the majority of Wii games.

MaxiP62:

Can motion controls be the future of gaming?

Child/casual gaming yes. Motion controls (while far less precise) are much less intimidating than a controller. They have no place (in their current guise) in the average gamers experience.

MaxiP62:

Did the lacking specs affect your opinion of it?

I didn't buy one for the raw power, I bought it for the games, so no, I have no complaints here.

MaxiP62:

Despite its setbacks, were the exclusives up to standard?

Unequivocally no. Skyward Sword and the Prime game aside, there was very little worth even renting.

MaxiP62:

Did you own one?

Yes.

MaxiP62:

Overall, what are your opinions on it?

A superb entry point for younger and newer gamers, but lacks any real engagement for the average (more developed) gamer. Xenoblade Chronicles deserves a mention for being fairly brilliant, though.

The Wii U seems like an awkward compromise between the approachability of the Wii and the conventions of the regular consoles - potentially loosing what makes the Wii unique and ultimately good.

I thought it was an OK console, judging by what I've played at friends' houses. I'm not a fan of motion control, which I see as nothing more than a gimmick that doesn't add to the experience and, in some cases, detracted from it. I felt that the library, largely due to the drowning amount of shovelware that cluttered it up, was inferior to the Xbox 360 and PS3's, which is why I didn't buy it. I guess motion controls can be the future of gaming, since the Wii has attracted so many previous non-gamers and casuals (which is half-good, half-bad; expanded the amount of gamers, while also having expanded the amount of crappy shovelware), as well as Sony and Microsoft implementing motion control too. I don't particularly care about the graphics, so that wasn't a problem.

But I've pretty much missed out on this generation of gaming due to my circumstances, one of them being a low amount of money to spend. But I have no desire to get the Wii U. I'm thinking of getting either the 3DS or the PSVita, depending on how it fares over time.

The Wii was quite a disappointment for me and was only really used to replace my broken Gamecube. Having said that though, its first party titles are still excelling every other standard in the industry but in my opinion were held back by the motion controls and severely outdated hardware. Not to say there aren't titles that haven't benefited from the motion controls. Metroid Prime and Pikmin are easier to play now and Skyward Sword introduced some interesting gameplay but there are still many more games they could have made better with a standard controller.

It wasn't really a wise move for Nintendo as they've now lost all credibility as a major game company to the huge amounts of casual games the motion controls have allowed on to the console.

number2301:

MaxiP62:

number2301:
In brief (cause I'm on my phone and I hate virtual keyboards) the main thing the Wii did for me is prove that motion controls aren't anything more than a gimmick. I've not seen a single compelling core experience which required motion controls.

Well done Nintendo, the Wii printed money, brought people who were never gamers into your target audience, and had the other companies scrambling to copy you. But lets move on.

I see what you mean, but here are examples of core experiences that used motion controls (pointer included) well:
- Red Steel 2
- Zelda: Skyward Sword
- Metroid Prime 3
- Zack & Wiki
- Warioware: Smooth Moves
- Pikmin 2 (Wii controls worked much better than Gamecube)

Uses motion controls well is rather different from 'couldn't have happened without motion controls'. I just can't get over the imprecision and overall pointlessness of it.

kind of like having a double joystick? Buttons (like the N64's c buttons) are actually more precise.

rob_simple:
The difference is that my examples were functional, motion controls at present are frivolous and don't work properly most of the time, that is a truth I have proved empirically with every Wii game I own.

I agree with you that they have a place in gaming (I don't think it should be limited to any one method of control and, yes, I'm hoping for some form of VR in my time too) but what I object to is the way they're currently being rammed down our throats.I prefer motion control games that give you the option to turn the motion control off, so that when I want to just lie on the couch and vegetate with a game I can do that.

So, in Ratchet & Clank I could disable the six-axis flight controls and just use the analogue stick. In Metroid Prime 3 though, (and that was a game I loved) if I want to play it, I have to be swinging controllers around, twisting this and pulling that and sometimes I just don't want to do that; it's creating barriers to play. The other objection I have to the Wii in particular is that, as Yahtzee pointed out years ago, it's pretty much limited to swords and guns.

This example will be shaky but try and stay with me on it: When I want to jump in a traditional game, I press X or A and I jump. That's it, no confusions or complications. When I want to jump in WiiFit, however, I have to bend my knees and then jump without my feet leaving the balance board. It's completely counter-intuitive to everything that jumping is. On the other hand: take those occasions in Dead Space when you got covered by those bullshit bugs that killed you in seconds; you furiously tap one button to get them off. That's dumb. If, instead, you used motion controls and waved your hand around like your were wiping them off, that'd be pretty cool.

I think motion controls can be a part of gaming but they shouldn't be the single core element because, with the best will in the world, they're never going to be as accurate as the precision afforded by a traditional controller.

There are several things that I disagree with here. The most obvious is that I feel that I've already played dozens of games that either wouldn't have been as good or wouldn't have worked at all without motion controls. You think that motion controls are much too raw to take out of the oven just yet, and I feel that, while they may be a bit undercooked, they make quite a treat when served properly.

When you say that motion controls are "never going to be as accurate as the precision afforded by a traditional controller," I think, "bullshit." I find that most of the people who think motion controls are unresponsive are simply uncoordinated. The waggle is one thing, but to argue that the Wii remote's pointer and gyroscope functions are inaccurate is simply asinine, and I pity the people who couldn't handle Skyward Sword without problems.

THE POINTER:
MP3 may have had superfluous nunchuck waggle commands, but running and gunning in that game felt better to me than any dual analog stick shooter ever has, and it's basically inarguable that the pointer is better suited for twitch reactions and quick switching. I don't see how fans of the mouse+keyboard combo can say that a gamepad with two analog sticks is better than an analog stick combined with a pointer. If the Wii Remote+ Nunchuk had been the standard control scheme for the original Halo, would people really think that replacing the pointer with an additional analog stick was an improvement? And I don't want to hear any crap about how it limits your turn speed or requires a moving reticle, because those are BS arguments....easily fixed through a basic preferences menu. Then there's the issue of accessibility/intuitiveness....let someone who's never played a video game try out both of these control schemes and then see if you want to continue arguing that the dual analog stick is more accurate.

As you mentioned, the mouse is good for selecting units in RTS games, so how is it that anybody can possibly think that the Wii remote isn't superior to conventional gamepads for the genre? Seriously, I'd love to hear how you think the 360 controller would be better suited for Starcraft than the Wii remote.

Even games like Final Fantasy and Elder Scrolls would be greatly improved with an onscreen pointer. Think about how much quicker you would be able to select combat commands or manage your options/abilities/inventory if you had an infrared pointer. I'm sorry, but to deny this point would be beyond stubborn.

THE GYROSCOPE:
Look at games like Bit.Trip Flux/Beat, Fluidity, Monkey Ball, and Mario Kart, as well as in-game mechanics like the plane control in Wii Sports Resort or the beetle in Skyward Sword.

Think about playing a racing game with a gyroscope instead of an analog stick. In both cases, you're limited to varying degrees of two directions. (tilting or pressing up/down doesn't do anything) The difference is, with the gyroscope, you can get much more accurate/sensitive control due to the greater displacement between neutral and the extreme of any one direction. On top of this, it is also much easier to maintain a constant turn of any degree, because with an analog stick, doing so requires that you apply constant pressure that is equal to the opposing elastic force. Most people, when making a turn that is less than the most extreme, would rather fluctuate rapidly between neutral and max than find the proper middle ground and stay there, but the gyroscope makes it much easier to find that proper turn radius and maintain it.

Bit.Trip Flux is essentially a modern day Pong, and the game wouldn't be possible with a 360 controller. You need either a mouse, a touchscreen, a pointer, or a gyroscope, otherwise the game would just be a hassle.....not fun in the least. But, thanks to the Wii Remote's gyroscope, it has become a modern day classic, and I was able to play the game at a completely different level....I was making insane twitch reactions and instantaneously moving the paddle from point A to B without even thinking. I was in a trance.....muscle memory was taking over, and I was able to associate paddle positions directly with my own hand orientations.....this just couldn't have happened on my Xbox, and even if the game had been ported, the change in control scheme would've made it a completely different (and inferior) game.

I'd like to hear how you think a simple game like Brick Breaker/Pong could be controlled on the 360.....funnily enough, I think Kinect is better suited for those types of games than the standard controller.

THE ACCELEROMETER:
Definitively the least accurate and nuanced of the Wii remote's motion capabilities, this was the feature that was most affected by the Motionplus expansion. It's true that this feature acts as a substitute for a simple button press all too often, but there are still cases where it shines.

I'm sure Skyward Sword is the obvious example to most people, and I happen to agree. Skyward Sword's combat was better than that of any other 3d Zelda IMO, and it had everything to do with the mechanic- not the controls. The fact that the controls were so well suited for this particular mechanic is obviously not a coincidence, but that doesn't mean that anything was shoehorned either, and I really don't think that the game would've been as fun if I was using an analog stick to make my sword slashes....and pressing the analog stick in to stab.

I hate to point to what is essentially a tech demo for another of my examples, but the Frisbee games from Wii Sports Resort really do stand out for me. The direction, speed, and orientation of the throw are all commanded by you and determined by the game in well less than a second in a way that is incredibly intuitive. Had the game been on the 360, it would've either been broken up into some menu-based proceedings or required some ridiculous control scheme that involved at least both analog sticks. As it is, the difficulty of the game isn't in the strategy- you already know how to throw the thing to get it through all the rings- it's in the execution, and if the difficulty weren't provided by the accelerometer, it would need to be provided by some other, more artificial source. It would end up looking like one of those golf games that require multiple well timed button presses in order to line up the arrows with the lines, and God knows we don't need any more of those.

All this adds up to me being incredulous of anybody who says that modern day motion controls are a gimmick, let alone motion controls in general. Sorry that this post dragged on for longer than I intended, but hopefully it gives you and other readers some idea of why I'm frustrated by the idea of any so-called "gamer" dismissing motion controls as a fad or a gimmick.

I think Nintendo has done a great service to the industry, it's brought in many, many people who would never consider gaming. It's made gaming more acceptable, brought gaming to families, etc. etc.

I'm not sure motion controls are the *future* of gaming, but I think they might be an aspect of gaming in the future. Some games will have normal controllers, some will have motion controls, and I think there is a lot of potential in motion controls. I've played games where motion controls have been an excellent addition.

Never had a problem with the poor graphics, I care very little about graphics and if the poor specs are what made the Wii so cheap, then I'd rather cheapness over graphics.

The exclusives were probably the best of the generation. Nintendo has always been very good with exclusives and this year has been no different.

And I did own a Wii.

Overall, I really liked the Wii. A very good console all around, I think I prefer it to the Xbox actually.

meh is really my opinion like it could have been a lot worse but overall i give the system a C rating perhaps it would have been better if an iPhone didn't have better specs then it but o well better luck next time Nintendo

xSKULLY:
my opinion on motion controls
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Nah...

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Every game I ever played on the Wii was ruined (or at least made worse) by the Wii controller.

I just bought one just because I found the Metroid Prime Trilogy! That suckers not going anywhere!!!

My opinion? Steaming pile of shit, thank God it's going away.

This console was pretty good, but it was probably one of the worst Nintendo home consoles. The motion consoles weren't that great in the early years, and the launch lineup wasn't the greatest ever. But, it did bring about some nice innovations, and whenever one of their mascot games was released, it was almost always great (except Other M). Overall, not the world-breaking mega-console some are saying it was, and not the pile of Smurf vomit others have been saying. It was just pretty good (except Other M).

A pretty big disappointment.

Yup I own a Wii have done soon after it launched.

TBH I think they have shot themselves in the foot with it a bit I mean they needed to sort themselves out after coming last in the previous generation but the market they tapped is fickle and IMO unsustainable for long. Now they need to get interest for the Wii U and I think they will have a hard time people are tired of gimmicks (or not so many people are interested in it anyway) while their Wii market has mostly disappeared and Nintendo left a lot of their traditional market behind with their new direction.

That said I do not think it is all doom and gloom once you dig through the dross the Wii has some pretty good titles with Super Mario Galaxy, The Last Story and especially Xenoblade Chronicles being among my favourite games this gen although I will admit they could have been done better on other systems, in theory anyway.

Motion Controls I hope have proven themselves to be a waste of time playing some of the wii sports games was fun for a while but it got old fast and I didnt play a game that I thought was improved with motion controls although oddly I thought Little Kings Story would have been perfect for including motion controls and yet it didnt use it.

Overall the Wii didnt live up to the legacy of Nintendos past consoles (well NES/SNES/GC) but in the end the three games mentioned previously justified the cost of purchasing a Wii for me, finally.

number2301:

MaxiP62:

number2301:
In brief (cause I'm on my phone and I hate virtual keyboards) the main thing the Wii did for me is prove that motion controls aren't anything more than a gimmick. I've not seen a single compelling core experience which required motion controls.

Well done Nintendo, the Wii printed money, brought people who were never gamers into your target audience, and had the other companies scrambling to copy you. But lets move on.

I see what you mean, but here are examples of core experiences that used motion controls (pointer included) well:
- Red Steel 2
- Zelda: Skyward Sword
- Metroid Prime 3
- Zack & Wiki
- Warioware: Smooth Moves
- Pikmin 2 (Wii controls worked much better than Gamecube)

Uses motion controls well is rather different from 'couldn't have happened without motion controls'. I just can't get over the imprecision and overall pointlessness of it.

Well isn't that the whole point? If you can make something that can be better for certain things even though we already have something that provides said function then great.

IE no one said to Thomas Edison when he invented the light bulb, "Umm dude... whats the point? we already have candles." Largely because the word "dude" didn't exist then but still....

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