Do you roleplay?
Yeah, I love making my own story.
60.7% (227)
60.7% (227)
I do, but not so much in games.
11.8% (44)
11.8% (44)
Eh, I guess.
9.6% (36)
9.6% (36)
Not really, doesn't seem too fun to me.
9.9% (37)
9.9% (37)
Hell no, that shit's weird.
4.5% (17)
4.5% (17)
Other.
2.4% (9)
2.4% (9)
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Poll: Hatred Towards Roleplaying

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Alright, to start off I know there is a good chunk of the escapist that enjoy roleplaying. That being said, I have to admit, I love roleplaying in video games. So when I hear people say "Roleplayers are so lame and have no life" or something along those lines in any form of gaming discussion, I just get a slight bit ticked. Now granted, I'm not a hardcore roleplayer and I have done most of my roleplaying on forums with giant two - four paragraph posts. But I have roleplayed in MMOs, specifically Dungeons and Dragons Online and I roleplay in RPGs, specifically Skyrim mostly. I've also taken a huge amount of interest in table-top RPGs.

Here's my problem, as much as I'd love to defend the RP Crowd, because we do deserve defending, we have a few odd balls. We can't deny that some of us are a bit out there, but needless to say, other games have odd balls too. For example, the MLG nut-heads in shooters. I'm surprised they still exist.

So with all that said and done...How many of you actually roleplay in your games? Like really roleplay with backstories and personalities, and maybe even talk to yourself like you're voicing your character.

I don't. But then I mostly play sims or RTSs so it would be a bit strange. I get asked to RP in chatrooms on the seldom instance I venture into them but I just can't be bothered. I tend not to want to write a story when I'm trying to relax.

I only text role play with others in groups. Sometimes in WoW everybody in our guild acknowledges each other like we're in the game world and we try to play pvp seriously like a real band of warriors. I don't see the point in subbing in my own story in a single player experience, especially since role playing falls flat when done alone because the world isn't as flexible and reactionary as a fellow human. Unless of course it's done with a wonderful satirical undercurrent like a running commentary a la Super Bummerman:

I find role playing in a single player game to be more than a bit odd. Doing it with a group is one thing, but making up a story based on what you did in a videogame, with no intention of writing it down[1], just seems weird to me. Then again, I find the concept of actual roleplaying (as opposed to roll-playing) in D&D to be a bit odd; most of the people I've known to do it would have been better off with either community theater or the SCA.

[1] like an after action report in a strategy game or space trading sim; they're still a bit odd, but at least it's writing practice, plus people like to share them

eh i don't really roleplay, but i see the reasons why someone would want to IRL and in video games, (i've done a few small things here and there), it's a "whatever floats your boat" perspective from me, i just enjoy what the game/modder has to offer, and i'll occasionally do small things here and there, but nothing a real RP'er would consider.

I thought I enjoyed "roleplaying" until I started playing D&D and played with some more hardcore roleplayers who really get into their characters. I mean, I like making a character who is a certain alignment and has certain moral beliefs, and making choices in-game based on those beliefs, but I can't get into talking like my character would all the time. Some of my friends have even gotten so into their characters that in-game conflicts led to irl "I can't play with you anymore" stuff.

I guess the best way I could put it is that I like to play roleplaying games (both tabletop and computer) with the attitude "I'm playing as this guy," not "I am this guy," you know?

I still like video game roleplaying though. That's fun.

dyre:
I thought I enjoyed "roleplaying" until I started playing D&D and played with some more hardcore roleplayers who really get into their characters. I mean, I like making a character who is a certain alignment and has certain moral beliefs, and making choices in-game based on those beliefs, but I can't get into talking like my character would all the time. Some of my friends have even gotten so into their characters that in-game conflicts led to irl "I can't play with you anymore" stuff.

I guess the best way I could put it is that I like to play roleplaying games (both tabletop and computer) with the attitude "I'm playing as this guy," not "I am this guy," you know?

I still like video game roleplaying though. That's fun.

Those are the ones I'm referring to when I say they'd be better off doing community theater. You don't have to spend much time around people like that for it to sour you on the whole experience XD

I find any form of role playing to be strange, awkward, and incredibly embarrassing for all involved parties. I have no problem playing RPGs, but when you start crafting back-stories and dressing up, it just gets weird.

I've tried roleplaying in Skyrim.

But then I just end up metagaming and doing random shit anyway. Or just doing murders with a theme (like once I killed all the "hunters" I found so I would be the best hunter in Skyrim).

I prefer taking on the role of someone like Geralt of Rivia and then roleplaying AS him. Stuff like TES is just far too much of a blank slate to get into.

Not so much in video games. I just don't really care enough about the characters. I know I definitely wouldn't in an MMO as well, just seems weird to me. I love Tabletop roleplaying though, not that I get the opportunity to do that very much. My friends would usually rather play Magic.

Owyn_Merrilin:

dyre:
I thought I enjoyed "roleplaying" until I started playing D&D and played with some more hardcore roleplayers who really get into their characters. I mean, I like making a character who is a certain alignment and has certain moral beliefs, and making choices in-game based on those beliefs, but I can't get into talking like my character would all the time. Some of my friends have even gotten so into their characters that in-game conflicts led to irl "I can't play with you anymore" stuff.

I guess the best way I could put it is that I like to play roleplaying games (both tabletop and computer) with the attitude "I'm playing as this guy," not "I am this guy," you know?

I still like video game roleplaying though. That's fun.

Those are the ones I'm referring to when I say they'd be better off doing community theater. You don't have to spend much time around people like that for it to sour you on the whole experience XD

Lol yeah, I'm staying away from that sort of roleplaying for the rest of my life, I think. Thankfully, the hardcore roleplayers eventually left our D&D group, and now the rest of us are just content playing D&D like a video game (DM tells a cool story; we follow along and make occasional important choices in that story, as well as the usual breaking into castles and killing monsters and that sort of stuff).

I don't ever role play . I voted that shit's weird. I prefer to not have a blank slate chracter and see where his story leads him .

DrgoFx:
Alright, to start off I know there is a good chunk of the escapist that enjoy roleplaying. That being said, I have to admit, I love roleplaying in video games. So when I hear people say "Roleplayers are so lame and have no life" or something along those lines in any form of gaming discussion, I just get a slight bit ticked. Now granted, I'm not a hardcore roleplayer and I have done most of my roleplaying on forums with giant two - four paragraph posts. But I have roleplayed in MMOs, specifically Dungeons and Dragons Online and I roleplay in RPGs, specifically Skyrim mostly. I've also taken a huge amount of interest in table-top RPGs.

Here's my problem, as much as I'd love to defend the RP Crowd, because we do deserve defending, we have a few odd balls. We can't deny that some of us are a bit out there, but needless to say, other games have odd balls too. For example, the MLG nut-heads in shooters. I'm surprised they still exist.

So with all that said and done...How many of you actually roleplay in your games? Like really roleplay with backstories and personalities, and maybe even talk to yourself like you're voicing your character.

i dont have anything against the people who play the games im just not a huge fan of the games themselves too much grind in most RPGS

"Roleplaying" to me means you're just playing according to your character. Playing as a thief ? Sneak around, steal stuff... When ppl start making up all this shit up for no reason, talking like their character would talk, I def found that very strange. They should get into theater/acting.

If the game actually acknowledges your actions, you're "roleplaying", If you're going around making up shit in your head and the game doesn't acknowledge it, your LARPing.(acting)

Yes I roleplay but only in TES. I make up my character's backstory, set some rules and act like my character would. That includes eating and sleeping. Kind of like New Vegas' hardcore mode I guess.

On about half of my City of Heroes characters I've written up little origins for them in the bio section - admittedly of those most are very very tongue in cheek. Similarly in CoH I'll quite often choose my missions based on who the character would be most likely to want to fight, or throw in the odd in-character comment if I'm on Virtue (the RP server.) It can be quite fun in such a larger than life setting.

But that's about as far as it goes. RP servers in MMOs often deserve their terrible reputations - being filled with drama queens, power gamers, posers, bios written by the illiterate and/or insane, and of course the ERPers. Goldshire, Silvermoon City, Pocket D... these are not places to go on RP servers if you value your innocence...

I really enjoy roleplaying, but I'm kind of embarassed to admit it. I get really annoyed when someone in any form of roleplay decides not to take it seriously. But I agree with the common sentiment of it being odd to roleplay in single player games. I do roleplay in forums, some multiplayer games (Minecraft, Champions Online), and D&D, and that's about where it ends.

I roleplay in certain games. It doesn't go very deep, but I do it because it's the only way I can enjoy certain games. Skyrim is a prime example, so I'll use that to describe it:

1) I make rules. These can be basic things like what weapons I use (which I adhere to strictly) and whether I'm fine with killing innocents or not. They can be character behaviors. For example, my first Skyrim character was a hunter, so I'd make a point to actually hunt and then sell the hides and meat. This also can affect whether I support or join certain factions (my first character destroyed the Dark Brotherhood rather than join it).

2) I make simple motivations. These just help give a little meaning to why I would get involved in the bigger events in the game. I just started a second character this week. His main thing is that he is a bit of a psychopath who wants revenge on the Empire for the events at the beginning of the game, so he is trying to acquire the skills to do that. I'm not bothering with the main quest at all (seriously, haven't even killed a dragon, nor do I plan on it). One of his rules is that (unless other obligations in the contract make it impossible) he kills his assassination targets in Werewolf form to cover his tracks. I figure that I'll do the Dark Brotherhood quest line, a few Daedric quests, and then the Stormcloak side of the civil war. Then that playthrough is done.

I don't make a deep backstory and I don't give my characters their own dialogue. I just do what I can to give things more context and make the world come alive a little more than it does on its own. It elevates the experience a great deal for me. Otherwise, thing just seem random and inconsequential.

dyre:
I thought I enjoyed "roleplaying" until I started playing D&D and played with some more hardcore roleplayers who really get into their characters. I mean, I like making a character who is a certain alignment and has certain moral beliefs, and making choices in-game based on those beliefs, but I can't get into talking like my character would all the time. Some of my friends have even gotten so into their characters that in-game conflicts led to irl "I can't play with you anymore" stuff.

I guess the best way I could put it is that I like to play roleplaying games (both tabletop and computer) with the attitude "I'm playing as this guy," not "I am this guy," you know?

I still like video game roleplaying though. That's fun.

How I basically roleplay is in a sense of is it reasonable? Like, when I feel my character would say something, I generally like saying it personally if he doesn't have a voice. Like in my few experiences with tabletop, I tended to go about with "Oh shit...that's a tough choice...um...My character does such and such." And then if the DM says something like "You found a valuable artifact" I would then same in the voice of character "Thank [insert god here] I'll be sleeping well tonight!"

I tend to switch a lot. When playing Skyrim in particular, I do the same thing. Like when talking to Mercer on my thief I "talked to him" as my character. Sure, it's a bit weird, but it's fun. As an actor though, it helps me and at the same time being an actor makes me know it's pretend and the actual roleplayer doesn't feel that way about me.

All the time. If a game allows me to create my own story, or alter the given story in some way, I'm all in for RP. This extends to MMOs as well where all of my alts do tend to end up acting and dressing differently and rarely talk out oc character unless I'm in an obvious OOC zone with friends.

I actually feel that people who don't RP are really only experiencing part of the game. In MMOs particularly this often means choosing the weaker part of the game as most MMOs don't offer all that much greatness in the actual moment to moment gameplay.

Yeah, I can enjoy roleplaying in games, depending on the game itself. I'm having a blast roleplaying my two characters in Skyrim right now.

Most of the fun in singleplayer RPGs for me comes from playing a specific type of character and interpreting the situation from their point of view. I haven't seen anyone offended from that, but I've seen multiplayer roleplaying be dissed quite often, and it's a shame, since it's the main thing that draws me to MMORPGs - being able to craft stories with other players. And it infuriates me that as far as the priorities in a modern MMO go, immersion isn't even on the damn list.

Roleplayers try to give MMOs the air of authenticity singleplayer RPGs have by assuming diverse roles in all sorts of factions - militia, mage covenants, crime syndicates, trade cartels, or zone-specific communities mixing all of the above, including petty commoners. And sometimes it all comes together in a fantastic way - walking around a city at night you won't see nondescript toons rushing about on mounts, but uniformed guards patrolling, adventurers filling up a player-run inn, zealots preaching, high citizenry bickering, PvP events and in-game holidays where hundreds of roleplayers pour in one spot.

Yet all of that has zero outlet in the gameplay itself - in modern MMOs there are no mechanics for guild warfare, housing, locational trading, full loot PvP, thievery, pure crafting or political roles, there isn't even practical-looking gear at high levels. Through RP addons and forum posts you're opened up to all this player-generated content, but it loses its luster after the 10-th military campaign with no impact whatsoever. It's a goddamn simulation within a simulation.

And what's ridiculous is that this type of sandbox features were available 15 years ago, but not now. They've been replaced with linear, now voiced questing, achievements, instanced raids and battlegrounds. Developers focus on storytelling and combat in a genre which's name is shorthand for "bad storytelling" and "bad combat".

I sincerely hope this madness will end at some point and MMORPGs will again be suitable sandboxes for roleplaying. Players interacting with each other in a persistent, changeable environment is their defining feature, and the only reason people agreed to pay their exorbitant prices in the first place.

Roleplaying--and yes, writing the story--is pretty much the only reason I'm still playing Fallout 3 after three and a half years (yeah, it really has been that long). My little vault dweller has had quite some adventures.. even being teleported across the continent to experience a new land...

I'm also working out a backstory for a character for Skyrim (and currently playtesting her planned playstyle). Just haven't quite decided which alternate start to use. ;)

It's one of those things that I don't love but I do enjoy.

Uh... kind of?

In games that give me the neccesary freedom I generally cause my characters to act in a consistent manner. Sometimes after a while I will form some notion of my character's personality based on those actions.

I don't talk to myself as them though, that seems excessive and silly.

As for why people would hate on roleplaying, well... does it really surprise you that someone whose hobby involves sitting at their computer pretending to be a mysterious elf ranger in the land of dragonwizardkings could be regarded as a bit weird? 'Cause it sure doesn't surprise me.

Eh, i dont really roleplay. I get these small tangents once or twice a year when it sounds like a jolly good time, but others i just cant be bothered with it. I'll come up with a nifty back story for a character, and maybe think a bit like him when im playing the game, but outside of that not to much else unless im willing to join friends who are also doing it.

I'm weird with role-playing, I can create a better character if I have something to work with. When I was playing Pokemon Black I created a strong personality for the main character and how he treats his pokemon and talks to people (and I would actually speak for him). I was limited by the game since everyone says the same thing no matter what, but with the personality I created it all falls into place.

It felt better than Skyrim which advertises role-playing I couldn't get into since my characters didn't fit the scripts. My first character went along well since she was an aloof murder with an innocent face who liked to act refined but turned giddy when it came to killing. So when people treated her like a noob it worked out because she was fooling them. My other character is a cocky badass so it's annoying when everyone treats you like a weakling especially when you're at a high level. No matter how I played characters still acted the same, honestly the guards remarks were the only part that made it feel like you were the character.

I roleplay in PnP all the time. MMOs... if the group is going for it anyway, I am happy to play along, but never seek it out. I tend to have backstories for all my gaming characters that are never vocalized.

Owyn_Merrilin:
I find role playing in a single player game to be more than a bit odd. Doing it with a group is one thing, but making up a story based on what you did in a videogame, with no intention of writing it down[1], just seems weird to me. Then again, I find the concept of actual roleplaying (as opposed to roll-playing) in D&D to be a bit odd; most of the people I've known to do it would have been better off with either community theater or the SCA.

I personally love some of the Sword of the Stars and Aurora (both 4x games) roleplays.

I have written a few of my own from where my little fledgling planet went from earth circa 2000 to an interstellar empire, then was crushed back to sol by an alien race before slowly fighting their way back to dominance.

if done right it can read like a good book with main characters popping up in the game (Aurora has all of your ship captains and ground commanders have names)

Playing these kinds of games (which at times can seem like spreadsheet simulators, particularly aurora) can get quite dull unless you have an active imagination and think about the happenings in a greater context.

[1] like an after action report in a strategy game or space trading sim; they're still a bit odd, but at least it's writing practice, plus people like to share them

Don't roleplay in games, but I like pen and paper role playing games.
I just have no one to play with, and technically no time to play.

Troublesome Lagomorph:
Don't roleplay in games, but I like pen and paper role playing games.

Likewise. More fun in terms of both a freedom to actually play a characters and the social element.

Though your mileage may vary.

I like the think the FemShepard I create is a descendant of General Shepherd from MW2. Their family was shamed for generations because of what he did so she is the first Shepard to enroll in the military since him. I know it is kinda weak.

I also like to RP in Skyrim as well as The Old Republic.

I have created and dungeon mastered my own table-top role-playing games and they have gone over well, we even started a group through MSN/Yahoo/Skype. I don't see the problem in role-playing through Skyrim or Falout New Vegas in order to make up for particularly bland stories. It's not like you need to dress up and start talking out loud to the screen. Just build a character accordingly and give them a personality to reference when confronted with conversations and events, what would {Insert Name Here} do in this situation?

FelixG:

Owyn_Merrilin:
I find role playing in a single player game to be more than a bit odd. Doing it with a group is one thing, but making up a story based on what you did in a videogame, with no intention of writing it down[1], just seems weird to me. Then again, I find the concept of actual roleplaying (as opposed to roll-playing) in D&D to be a bit odd; most of the people I've known to do it would have been better off with either community theater or the SCA.

I personally love some of the Sword of the Stars and Aurora (both 4x games) roleplays.

I have written a few of my own from where my little fledgling planet went from earth circa 2000 to an interstellar empire, then was crushed back to sol by an alien race before slowly fighting their way back to dominance.

if done right it can read like a good book with main characters popping up in the game (Aurora has all of your ship captains and ground commanders have names)

Playing these kinds of games (which at times can seem like spreadsheet simulators, particularly aurora) can get quite dull unless you have an active imagination and think about the happenings in a greater context.

It was 4X games I was mainly thinking about when I made the footnote; it's always kind of interesting to see a good after action report. The difference for me is that writing down a characterized version of a 4X session is a neat little creative writing exercise, while just doing it all in your head is... well, odd. Also, I completely get what you're saying about them being spreadsheets: the game. Ever play Space Empires V? It's the most spreadsheet-y 4X game I've ever played, and one of the best.

Edit: I should clarify. Having a passing thought or two about the emergent story is okay. It's actually pretending to be a character, like the tabletop roleplayers who were described as taking it too far a little up the page, but without any sort of audience, that I find to be incredibly bizarre.

[1] like an after action report in a strategy game or space trading sim; they're still a bit odd, but at least it's writing practice, plus people like to share them

Owyn_Merrilin:

FelixG:

Owyn_Merrilin:
I find role playing in a single player game to be more than a bit odd. Doing it with a group is one thing, but making up a story based on what you did in a videogame, with no intention of writing it down[1], just seems weird to me. Then again, I find the concept of actual roleplaying (as opposed to roll-playing) in D&D to be a bit odd; most of the people I've known to do it would have been better off with either community theater or the SCA.

I personally love some of the Sword of the Stars and Aurora (both 4x games) roleplays.

I have written a few of my own from where my little fledgling planet went from earth circa 2000 to an interstellar empire, then was crushed back to sol by an alien race before slowly fighting their way back to dominance.

if done right it can read like a good book with main characters popping up in the game (Aurora has all of your ship captains and ground commanders have names)

Playing these kinds of games (which at times can seem like spreadsheet simulators, particularly aurora) can get quite dull unless you have an active imagination and think about the happenings in a greater context.

It was 4X games I was mainly thinking about when I made the footnote; it's always kind of interesting to see a good after action report. The difference for me is that writing down a characterized version of a 4X session is a neat little creative writing exercise, while just doing it all in your head is... well, odd. Also, I completely get what you're saying about them being spreadsheets: the game. Ever play Space Empires V? It's the most spreadsheet-y 4X game I've ever played, and one of the best.

Hm, never heard of that one, will have to pick it up on Steam when I get home come monday.

If you are fan of 4x games you should check out Aurora, it is the dwarf fort of space based 4x games. It has very, very limited graphics, but the pure amount of options is astounding.

Though I have to disagree with the coming up with the stuff in your head is strange part, I would never have thought to write it down if I first hadnt come up with the stories and adventures of my officers in my head first. I am still rather depressed that the save game and the stories I had written for them imploded with my flashdrive :(

[1] like an after action report in a strategy game or space trading sim; they're still a bit odd, but at least it's writing practice, plus people like to share them

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