Am I the only one who refuses to play fighting games online?

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I would much rather fight the CPU on the hardest difficulty. 40% of the people use the most overpowered, easiest character to use. The other 40% mash. 10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself. But you can still get owned by either party. Which is why I will never buy a fighting game in my life besides P4A.

Discuss lack of skills in games and easy combos that instant kill.

Adultism:
I would much rather fight the CPU on the hardest difficulty. 40% of the people use the most overpowered, easiest character to use. The other 40% mash. 10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself. But you can still get owned by either party. Which is why I will never buy a fighting game in my life besides P4A.

Discuss lack of skills in games and easy combos that instant kill.

I agree entirely with you, but what happened the other 10%?

I suggest finding a comunity is your area . I recently discoverd a lounge in downtown montreal for fighting game players . Open 6 days a week all day . It's basically a place to play videogames and meet people , for free . You can get any console there , they got arcade machines , they got televisions and sofas . And they sell food and drink . Fighting game players in my area , go they to meet new people , have tournaments , and generally have a good time playin fighting games . Okay now i'm braging . But you should check if there is anything like that in you area .

Edit: i like how you imply the CPU isn't cheap . Go play score attack mode in P4A and get back to me lol . Max difficulty Elizibeth spams beam worst than players online .

krazykidd:
I suggest finding a comunity is your area . I recently discoverd a lounge in downtown montreal for fighting game players . Open 6 days a week all day . It's basically a place to play videogames and meet people , for free . You can get any console there , they got arcade machines , they got televisions and sofas . And they sell food and drink . Fighting game players in my area , go they to meet new people , have tournaments , and generally have a good time playin fighting games . Okay now i'm braging . But you should check if there is anything like that in you area .

Edit: i like how you imply the CPU isn't cheap . Go play score attack mode in P4A and get back to me lol . Max difficulty Elizibeth spams beam worst than players online .

No, just no. Communities, espesially ones of the fighting variety, are worse than 12 year olds playing CoD.

Its all just everyone stroking their egos.

Adultism:
I would much rather fight the CPU on the hardest difficulty. 40% of the people use the most overpowered, easiest character to use. The other 40% mash. 10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself. But you can still get owned by either party. Which is why I will never buy a fighting game in my life besides P4A.

Discuss lack of skills in games and easy combos that instant kill.

...and the other 10% can do math! :P

But yeah, I tend to just play fighters offline. Tends to be that I get a fighting game later on into it's life so to speak, so everyone still playing pretty much knows every combo and all that jazz so kick my arse royally.

Adultism:
10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself.

Look, I ain't saying you're bad at fighting games, but unless you're playing the most broken fighting game of all time, it's a non issue.

Button mashers shouldn't even be a problem for anyone who 'actually uses skill', that's a fact.

I'll be the first to say that button mashers throw me off at first because they're movement is erratic and unpredictable, but once you go on the defensive, you can destroy them easily.

RaikuFA:

krazykidd:
I suggest finding a comunity is your area . I recently discoverd a lounge in downtown montreal for fighting game players . Open 6 days a week all day . It's basically a place to play videogames and meet people , for free . You can get any console there , they got arcade machines , they got televisions and sofas . And they sell food and drink . Fighting game players in my area , go they to meet new people , have tournaments , and generally have a good time playin fighting games . Okay now i'm braging . But you should check if there is anything like that in you area .

Edit: i like how you imply the CPU isn't cheap . Go play score attack mode in P4A and get back to me lol . Max difficulty Elizibeth spams beam worst than players online .

No, just no. Communities, espesially ones of the fighting variety, are worse than 12 year olds playing CoD.

Its all just everyone stroking their egos.

So, why do you play fighting games again?

You are never the only one. Ever. And "10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself" just comes off as arrogant.

I generally prefer playing offline as well but I mostly enjoy VS mode offline nothing beats playing with friends. I grew up playing SF2 on the SNES at home so am just used to hammering arcade mode which is why I hate overpowered bosses that fighting games especially this gen seem obsessed with it just makes arcade less fun.

I do try online more now and have had fun I enjoyed SF4 online when it came out and I really enjoyed SC5 online, if you really want to get good you need to play good human players comp AI is always expoitable it can be brutal and teach you to an extent but a lot of the tactics that the comp falls for over and over again a (good) human player wont.

That said a lot of people play to win so they will use top tier characters (your overpowered easy characters) although tbf not all fighting games have such god like characters quite a lot are pretty balanced (some more so than others) if you keep losing to these characters and it bothers you either use them yourself or man up and get better so you can rub it in their face, no matter who you pick people will moan oh hes OP you cheater hes just a scrubby projectile character you picked her just because she is a woman you loser oh you picked a low tier character you are trolling etc.

Mashers are easily defeated by anyone with the slightest bit of experience with the game they just dont have a clue about defence and spacing sure they may get lucky occasionally but overall you should win a good 95% of matches against mashers without breaking a sweat. Hell its fun to turn their scrubby tactics back on them and out cheap them as it were I once beat a guy using Ken in SF2 turbo online (is it turbo? the DL one on xbox live anyway) just by doing constant sweeps in the corner for two whole rounds he just wouldnt block he ovc called me a noob who should learn some moves despite only needing one to beat him because all he was doing was being an idiot and jumping in doing stupid shit allowing me easy anti airs and allow me to pressure him with very easy and repeated moves he couldnt handle.

Everyone thinks they use skill and timing in these games sure a lot do fight to the best of their ability well they fight to win usually and hopefully have fun as well as improve themselves at the game but you employ different tactics against different opponents i.e you wouldnt try fakes against someone who dosent understand mindgames as they would hit you or simply not bite you just use a few mix ups to destroy them. If you can beat someone easily by mashing because your spacing game is far superior and the other person obviously has no skill to counter your easy technique you may as well do it I mean why strain yourself. You will know when you meet an opponent of real skill because mashing against them wont do anything except get you killed even if you are using a top tier character unless you actually know what you are doing your chances of victory are slim to say the least.

In my experience people with lack of skills blame other factors for their loss I mean it couldnt possibly be them right because they are god like no it was that cheap character or spammy move they cant deal with. I dont know any 100% easy kill combos I think Tekken vs SF had some but not sure anymore and their are 1 move infinites with X factor lvl 2 and 3 in UMVC3 I believe so maybe thats the easiest failing that there are the instant kill moves in Guilty Gear, Blazblue and Persona 4 arena which are easy to perform (landing thems another matter). Really any instant kill combo in any remotely balanced fighting game (all the ones I have played this gen are at least reasonably balanced) is not easy to pull off UMVC3 arguably has the easiest ones as you will see tounch of death combos from top players frequently but you have to put in quite a bit of time to pull these combos off especially reliably in the heat of battle in short they are not easy unless you are some gaming prodigy or have put some serious practice in.

You are never the only one. That being said, I don't even play fighting games. When I do play fighting games though I struggle to get through the single player, non-challenge bit on the easiest of easy settings. I don't play fighting games often and am not good at them to begin with if it wasn't already obvious.

krazykidd:

RaikuFA:

krazykidd:
I suggest finding a comunity is your area . I recently discoverd a lounge in downtown montreal for fighting game players . Open 6 days a week all day . It's basically a place to play videogames and meet people , for free . You can get any console there , they got arcade machines , they got televisions and sofas . And they sell food and drink . Fighting game players in my area , go they to meet new people , have tournaments , and generally have a good time playin fighting games . Okay now i'm braging . But you should check if there is anything like that in you area .

Edit: i like how you imply the CPU isn't cheap . Go play score attack mode in P4A and get back to me lol . Max difficulty Elizibeth spams beam worst than players online .

No, just no. Communities, espesially ones of the fighting variety, are worse than 12 year olds playing CoD.

Its all just everyone stroking their egos.

So, why do you play fighting games again?

I don't. I also don't see why people think the arcade mentallity is ok.

Daystar Clarion:

Adultism:
10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself.

Look, I ain't saying you're bad at fighting games, but unless you're playing the most broken fighting game of all time, it's a non issue.

Button mashers shouldn't even be a problem for anyone who 'actually uses skill', that's a fact.

I'll be the first to say that button mashers throw me off at first because they're movement is erratic and unpredictable, but once you go on the defensive, you can destroy them easily.

Yep. That be the truth.

And people play strong characters because they like to win. I'd imagine that's why most people play fighting games. Thing is, pretty much any modern fighting game is well enough balanced that most of the cast has at least a chance of winning as long as the user plays well enough.

StriderShinryu:

Daystar Clarion:

Adultism:
10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself.

Look, I ain't saying you're bad at fighting games, but unless you're playing the most broken fighting game of all time, it's a non issue.

Button mashers shouldn't even be a problem for anyone who 'actually uses skill', that's a fact.

I'll be the first to say that button mashers throw me off at first because they're movement is erratic and unpredictable, but once you go on the defensive, you can destroy them easily.

Yep. That be the truth.

And people play strong characters because they like to win. I'd imagine that's why most people play fighting games. Thing is, pretty much any modern fighting game is well enough balanced that most of the cast has at least a chance of winning as long as the user plays well enough.

I'd like to think that its cause they like to boost their egos.

Daystar Clarion:

Adultism:
10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself.

Look, I ain't saying you're bad at fighting games, but unless you're playing the most broken fighting game of all time, it's a non issue.

Button mashers shouldn't even be a problem for anyone who 'actually uses skill', that's a fact.

I'll be the first to say that button mashers throw me off at first because they're movement is erratic and unpredictable, but once you go on the defensive, you can destroy them easily.

This. So much.

Besides, the computer is no substitute for actual players. Playing against CPUs long enough boils down to pattern recognition instead of reading.

Hell, trying to read the opponent is one of the more enjoyable aspects of these games. Why deprive yourself?

I hate to break this to you, but you are not as good as you think you are.

Those people who are "button mashing" could be using skill that you don't know of. If these fighters are using the same moves over and over again then you should easily be able to spot those patterns. A good player is able to use the best move in the give siutation. What's not to say that those repeted moves are the best moves?

RaikuFA:

StriderShinryu:

Daystar Clarion:

Look, I ain't saying you're bad at fighting games, but unless you're playing the most broken fighting game of all time, it's a non issue.

Button mashers shouldn't even be a problem for anyone who 'actually uses skill', that's a fact.

I'll be the first to say that button mashers throw me off at first because they're movement is erratic and unpredictable, but once you go on the defensive, you can destroy them easily.

Yep. That be the truth.

And people play strong characters because they like to win. I'd imagine that's why most people play fighting games. Thing is, pretty much any modern fighting game is well enough balanced that most of the cast has at least a chance of winning as long as the user plays well enough.

I'd like to think that its cause they like to boost their egos.

It's a sense of achievement gained through use of skill and knowledge of the game. I'm not certain what sort of games you play, but seeing as how that sort of thing exists in almost every game out there, I'd imagine that that sense of achievement is also something you enjoy. Call it ego boosting if you want, but bear in mind that you're likely just as guilty of it as fighting game players are. In the case of the fighting game player, however, it just happens that you're getting to that point by beating a human opponent instead of an AI construct of some sort. Of course, by and large, this makes the sense of achievement greater as the task itself is as well.

StriderShinryu:

RaikuFA:

StriderShinryu:

Yep. That be the truth.

And people play strong characters because they like to win. I'd imagine that's why most people play fighting games. Thing is, pretty much any modern fighting game is well enough balanced that most of the cast has at least a chance of winning as long as the user plays well enough.

I'd like to think that its cause they like to boost their egos.

It's a sense of achievement gained through use of skill and knowledge of the game. I'm not certain what sort of games you play, but seeing as how that sort of thing exists in almost every game out there, I'd imagine that that sense of achievement is also something you enjoy. Call it ego boosting if you want, but bear in mind that you're likely just as guilty of it as fighting game players are. In the case of the fighting game player, however, it just happens that you're getting to that point by beating a human opponent instead of an AI construct of some sort. Of course, by and large, this makes the sense of achievement greater as the task itself is as well.

But at least in other games that I play, you don't get shamed for losing. I don't see fans of other genres scouting and then harrassing newcomers because they're new. Making sure these newcomers are shamed and never feel welcome at arcades. Is that really a sense of achievement? Bullying people just for showing an intrest in what you like?

I refuse to play fighting and racing games online (except Burnout Paradise). The thought of lag in games that require precisely timed attacks and turns to win is a nightmare.

I don't play them offline either. Only fighting games I own are SSB Melee and Brawl, because they are simple enough and filled with Nintendo fanboy stuff which I grew up being and sadly still am to a small extent despite little reason these days.

I played online a few times. It was okay. I think I was using Ganon, Sheik, or Zero Suit Samus mostly. I know they banned Meta Knight from tournament play lol.

I suck at fighting games, against the pc or other player equally at times. Its like the one genre that I just never got any better at. I'm pretty bad at FPS but I still get the occasional kill streak of 3 or 4. Under ideal situations (i.e. my team not spawn camping the other team) I am a fairly decent sniper. I mainly suck at those moments where you suddenly come face to face with someone and they instantly head shot you despite having no way to have know you would be right there. Or as is the case in most games, when they have some kind of OP power active that makes them a badass temporarily or they are abusing some OP weapon set up or glitch that overwhelms every other method of play.

Anyone remember Killzone 2 multi, and how before it was patched everyone would just run around with the heavy armor and the magnum one/two shotting people? Or spamming rockets everywhere? At least in that game you could disable certain weapons, and so rockets were pretty much banned from all matches. Then it became everyone spamming spot and mark, which killed my sniper career pretty effectively (because stupidly it worked even on fully cloaked snipers with a really short CD) and made positioning/flanking in general completely pointless.

That's how playing a fighting games feels to me. Completely pointless because I haven't spent years mastering every conceivable playstyle and the way to counter it, and perfected every archaic button combo to perform all the best moves and counters and reversals etc.

It may as well be a game that requires me to play the shamisen while evading a shark, and then doing it online against thousands of other people that have been doing it for 12+years lol.

Also I can't think of a genre that is more prone to imbalance and outright cheating. When one player can break half the rules of the game, why would you keep playing that game?

I love fighting games and I've spent over 200 hours in every one of my favourite fighting titles. I'll take my time to learn mechanics and combos in order to become an almost unstoppable force when it comes to x or y title. However, I have a job, I have a girlfriend and I have other things to do, so there is always someone out there who can kick my ass. It doesn't matter to me, I fight because I like to and I'm always up for a good challenge. Whatever the final result of it may be. Playing online in a fighting game is always a ton of fun for me. I can destroy everyone and just have fun. I can be crushed and just fight for the heck of it and in the process learn some new tricks. Or I can find someone with my skill level and have a nice showdown till one of us falls.

Whatever the case may be, to me, online is the greatest blessing to the fighting genre since super moves.

RaikuFA:

I'd like to think that its cause they like to boost their egos.

It's a sense of achievement gained through use of skill and knowledge of the game. I'm not certain what sort of games you play, but seeing as how that sort of thing exists in almost every game out there, I'd imagine that that sense of achievement is also something you enjoy. Call it ego boosting if you want, but bear in mind that you're likely just as guilty of it as fighting game players are. In the case of the fighting game player, however, it just happens that you're getting to that point by beating a human opponent instead of an AI construct of some sort. Of course, by and large, this makes the sense of achievement greater as the task itself is as well.[/quote]

But at least in other games that I play, you don't get shamed for losing. I don't see fans of other genres scouting and then harrassing newcomers because they're new. Making sure these newcomers are shamed and never feel welcome at arcades. Is that really a sense of achievement? Bullying people just for showing an intrest in what you like?[/quote]

As you've already admitted that you don't play fighting games, I'm not sure where you're getting this information from. Certainly there are some jerks within the fighting game community, but that subset exists in every group of gamers. In RPGs it's the losers who laugh at you for not being level 99 and min maxed to the extreme. In platformers it's the losers who laugh at you for not being able to beat I Want To Be The Guy in 5 minutes. Heck, in table top chess it's the losers who laugh at you when they check mate you in a handful of moves. The common denominator is the loser, not the game.

The vast majority of fighting game players have no issue with offering a helping hand if you show interest in the game and in actually improving. In fact, the better the player the more likely they are to be helpful given that one of the best ways to improve your own game is to break things down for someone else and give up some of your tricks.

Unless the game is poorly designed, someone who knows what he's doing can won a button masher hands down. As for the easiest character... so. That gives you a challenge. Be better then the guy with the advantage, live the underdog story. Show them how its done! Also, your numbers add up to 90%, you should fix that.

I really only play fighting games online with my brother other than that I don't play online try playing Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom 3 online and you are almost guaranteed to fight Dante or Ryu on every other team

Yeah... I tried to play Soulcalibur IV online. It was fun when I wasn't fighting against people using nothing but Astaroth and Cervantes spam. Which was most of the time. I mainly just play that online to show off my created characters, though.
(But seriously, Astaroth spam is ridiculous...)

KoudelkaMorgan:

Also I can't think of a genre that is more prone to imbalance and outright cheating. When one player can break half the rules of the game, why would you keep playing that game?

While I can see where you're coming from in regards to experience level (I have been playing them since SF2 and still have only a few games I can really compete in), this statement is really only partially true. Fighting games are absolutely very prone to balance issues, but when the entire focus of the game is direct one on one competition steps are taken to keep things as fair and balanced as possible. When you're dealing with a diverse cast of characters, you're always going to have better and worse match ups, but I can't think of a modern fighting game that I would consider at all imbalanced to a degree where the majority of the cast isn't usable.

As for cheating, it pretty much doesn't exist. That may be a hold statement, but it's true. You don't find the sort of cheating in fighters that you do in other games, partially because of the player base and partially because it's so obvious. If you find something that someone else is doing to be cheating or breaking the rules of the game, chances are you just don't understand the game well enough to make that call. I don't mean that disparagingly, I just mean it as someone who does know the games and can see the sort of "rule breaking" mechanics for what they really are.

I refuse to play them because I run into 4 people: 1. The new guy who signals his combos soooo obviously that I can usually pull off the combo they are trying to do before they can, even if they started first. 2. The GODLIKE PRO who can endlessly stunlock you into oblivion and back with ease. 3. The Spammer who only uses spam attacks, Chun-Li kick spam, Amateratsu Heavy Attack spam, and other such tactics. 4. The "Ironic" player who picks the worst character in the game but SURPRISE! they are godlike with them and proceed to wipe the floor with you using Dan -_-

StriderShinryu:

RaikuFA:

I'd like to think that its cause they like to boost their egos.

It's a sense of achievement gained through use of skill and knowledge of the game. I'm not certain what sort of games you play, but seeing as how that sort of thing exists in almost every game out there, I'd imagine that that sense of achievement is also something you enjoy. Call it ego boosting if you want, but bear in mind that you're likely just as guilty of it as fighting game players are. In the case of the fighting game player, however, it just happens that you're getting to that point by beating a human opponent instead of an AI construct of some sort. Of course, by and large, this makes the sense of achievement greater as the task itself is as well.

But at least in other games that I play, you don't get shamed for losing. I don't see fans of other genres scouting and then harrassing newcomers because they're new. Making sure these newcomers are shamed and never feel welcome at arcades. Is that really a sense of achievement? Bullying people just for showing an intrest in what you like?[/quote]

As you've already admitted that you don't play fighting games, I'm not sure where you're getting this information from. Certainly there are some jerks within the fighting game community, but that subset exists in every group of gamers. In RPGs it's the losers who laugh at you for not being level 99 and min maxed to the extreme. In platformers it's the losers who laugh at you for not being able to beat I Want To Be The Guy in 5 minutes. Heck, in table top chess it's the losers who laugh at you when they check mate you in a handful of moves. The common denominator is the loser, not the game.

The vast majority of fighting game players have no issue with offering a helping hand if you show interest in the game and in actually improving. In fact, the better the player the more likely they are to be helpful given that one of the best ways to improve your own game is to break things down for someone else and give up some of your tricks.[/quote]

I used to, I don't anymore. I have never seen a fighting game fan want to help a newcomer. I have seen people help out others in RPGs and chess and if they start berating a newcomer, they get called out on it. They also don't have forums making the newcomers stay in one part so the pros can make fun of them.

RaikuFA:

I used to, I don't anymore. I have never seen a fighting game fan want to help a newcomer. I have seen people help out others in RPGs and chess and if they start berating a newcomer, they get called out on it. They also don't have forums making the newcomers stay in one part so the pros can make fun of them.

Well, I'm honestly not sure what to say then beyond you maybe just had a really bad but fairly isolated experience. The majority of players I know and scenes I'm familiar with are welcoming to those who show interest. Even if you're not comfortable in person, just search any fighting game you want on Youtube and you'll find hundreds of videos made by players with the express purpose of teaching others. Forums... well. they're forums. Welcome to the Internet and all that.. but there are just as many good as bad in that regard to.

StriderShinryu:

KoudelkaMorgan:

Also I can't think of a genre that is more prone to imbalance and outright cheating. When one player can break half the rules of the game, why would you keep playing that game?

While I can see where you're coming from in regards to experience level (I have been playing them since SF2 and still have only a few games I can really compete in), this statement is really only partially true. Fighting games are absolutely very prone to balance issues, but when the entire focus of the game is direct one on one competition steps are taken to keep things as fair and balanced as possible. When you're dealing with a diverse cast of characters, you're always going to have better and worse match ups, but I can't think of a modern fighting game that I would consider at all imbalanced to a degree where the majority of the cast isn't usable.

As for cheating, it pretty much doesn't exist. That may be a hold statement, but it's true. You don't find the sort of cheating in fighters that you do in other games, partially because of the player base and partially because it's so obvious. If you find something that someone else is doing to be cheating or breaking the rules of the game, chances are you just don't understand the game well enough to make that call. I don't mean that disparagingly, I just mean it as someone who does know the games and can see the sort of "rule breaking" mechanics for what they really are.

In tournament play, certain characters are sometimes banned from competition. Meta Knight on Brawl for example was considered too overpowered to be fair. The cheating statement was perhaps erroneous. When someone seems to take absolutely zero damage and practically one shots you it sure seems that way sometimes. Idk if I would call it a cheat but I know that Akuma's jumping fireball had to be patched as it would 100% crash the game if it hit another projectile lol.

StriderShinryu:

RaikuFA:

I used to, I don't anymore. I have never seen a fighting game fan want to help a newcomer. I have seen people help out others in RPGs and chess and if they start berating a newcomer, they get called out on it. They also don't have forums making the newcomers stay in one part so the pros can make fun of them.

Well, I'm honestly not sure what to say then beyond you maybe just had a really bad but fairly isolated experience. The majority of players I know and scenes I'm familiar with are welcoming to those who show interest. Even if you're not comfortable in person, just search any fighting game you want on Youtube and you'll find hundreds of videos made by players with the express purpose of teaching others. Forums... well. they're forums. Welcome to the Internet and all that.. but there are just as many good as bad in that regard to.

Try a few instances online and off. And from what I've seen and heard, that behavior is considered acceptable. And how do youtube videos help? Aren't they just like the tutorials in game?

Adultism:
I would much rather fight the CPU on the hardest difficulty. 40% of the people use the most overpowered, easiest character to use. The other 40% mash. 10% of the players actually use skill and timing like myself. But you can still get owned by either party. Which is why I will never buy a fighting game in my life besides P4A.

Discuss lack of skills in games and easy combos that instant kill.

Funny, most people who use "skill and timing" prefer fighting other players to.... get this... improve their skill and timing. Sounds like your tactics are deliberate but you don't understand why you're losing. Either that or your FG experience is limited to MvC3.

First off, you will never improve by fighting the AI on any difficulty. It doesn't understand mind games, baiting, etc. It just uses patterns, reads your inputs and reacts. It can easily be exploited. Lower difficulties simply increase the amount of times it just stands there with its guard down.

Second, most of the good players avoid online play because of lag, but they still fight other humans and do not fear mashers or tier whores, mainly because those are the most predictable opponents and are easily destroyed.

Third, Yes even the best players can lose to a less skilled opponent due to critical mistakes or comeback mechanics, but they overcome this by analysing their battles and figuring out what they did wrong, and/or seeking advice. Not by bitching about it on a forum. They also understand that losing is part of competition. The only way to not lose is to not play.

You're welcome to your opinions, but you have the wrong attitude to excel at fighting games. Simple as that.

Judgement101:
1. The new guy who signals his combos soooo obviously that I can usually pull off the combo they are trying to do before they can, even if they started first.

This is a fairly common criticism. But what's actually WRONG with it? That they aren't any good? So what, if they enjoy the game, don't try to say that they shouldn't play it. And, if your argument is that they should practice with the computer before moving on to a human, what if they felt that they were ready, but were wrong? Or what if they wanted to see what a 2-player fight was like to prepare for later?

217not237:

Judgement101:
1. The new guy who signals his combos soooo obviously that I can usually pull off the combo they are trying to do before they can, even if they started first.

This is a fairly common criticism. But what's actually WRONG with it? That they aren't any good? So what, if they enjoy the game, don't try to say that they shouldn't play it. And, if your argument is that they should practice with the computer before moving on to a human, what if they felt that they were ready, but were wrong? Or what if they wanted to see what a 2-player fight was like to prepare for later?

I just don't like how there is a massive skill difference. I mostly get people much better than me or much worse with barely any middle ground. Personally, I just don't like it because it turns into a complete shut out either way.

KoudelkaMorgan:

StriderShinryu:

KoudelkaMorgan:

Also I can't think of a genre that is more prone to imbalance and outright cheating. When one player can break half the rules of the game, why would you keep playing that game?

While I can see where you're coming from in regards to experience level (I have been playing them since SF2 and still have only a few games I can really compete in), this statement is really only partially true. Fighting games are absolutely very prone to balance issues, but when the entire focus of the game is direct one on one competition steps are taken to keep things as fair and balanced as possible. When you're dealing with a diverse cast of characters, you're always going to have better and worse match ups, but I can't think of a modern fighting game that I would consider at all imbalanced to a degree where the majority of the cast isn't usable.

As for cheating, it pretty much doesn't exist. That may be a hold statement, but it's true. You don't find the sort of cheating in fighters that you do in other games, partially because of the player base and partially because it's so obvious. If you find something that someone else is doing to be cheating or breaking the rules of the game, chances are you just don't understand the game well enough to make that call. I don't mean that disparagingly, I just mean it as someone who does know the games and can see the sort of "rule breaking" mechanics for what they really are.

In tournament play, certain characters are sometimes banned from competition. Meta Knight on Brawl for example was considered too overpowered to be fair. The cheating statement was perhaps erroneous. When someone seems to take absolutely zero damage and practically one shots you it sure seems that way sometimes. Idk if I would call it a cheat but I know that Akuma's jumping fireball had to be patched as it would 100% crash the game if it hit another projectile lol.

Yeah, you're right in saying that there are occasional character bans but that's pretty isolated and it's generally for very obvious reasons. Even the Metaknight was a disputed ban and not something everyone thought was necessary.

Akuma's fireball? I know in his original appearance and it's remake (SSF2T & SSF2T:HDR) he was banned for being totally game breaking but he hasn't been since. That's more a case of his design as an ultimate boss character that literally wasn't even intended for competitive play.

You may be thinking of Rolento's air knife toss in Street Fighter X Tekken. One of the patches for that game did introduce a glitch that caused the game to freeze if his knife impacted another projectile. Until the glitch got patched, use of the move was banned though I'm pretty sure the character wasn't (and his knife toss isn't used all that often anyway).

RaikuFA:

StriderShinryu:

RaikuFA:

I used to, I don't anymore. I have never seen a fighting game fan want to help a newcomer. I have seen people help out others in RPGs and chess and if they start berating a newcomer, they get called out on it. They also don't have forums making the newcomers stay in one part so the pros can make fun of them.

Well, I'm honestly not sure what to say then beyond you maybe just had a really bad but fairly isolated experience. The majority of players I know and scenes I'm familiar with are welcoming to those who show interest. Even if you're not comfortable in person, just search any fighting game you want on Youtube and you'll find hundreds of videos made by players with the express purpose of teaching others. Forums... well. they're forums. Welcome to the Internet and all that.. but there are just as many good as bad in that regard to.

Try a few instances online and off. And from what I've seen and heard, that behavior is considered acceptable. And how do youtube videos help? Aren't they just like the tutorials in game?

They help because they break down the game and it's systems far more than an ingame tutorial has the time or depth to do. Things like UltraChenTVs episodes can spend an entire hour breaking down a specific concept or a series of high level matches. You can't do that sort of thing with an in game tutorial and it's something that helps both new and experienced players.

Videos also do perhaps the most important thing that a tutorial can't (or, more precisely, don't do). They actually evolve as the game does. Even the best in game tutorial can't predict how play of a game will evolve months or even years down the line. Videos, on the other hand, are always going to be up to date.

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