We are the minority of game players.

I think it needs to be said. We, the people who keep up with gaming news, follow the industry and agonize and/or praise what happens are the minority of people who buy and play games.

I don't have actual numbers but us game enthusiasts are probably less than a quarter of the market. what this means is that we only really have niche games marketed towards us, the rest are marketed towards much larger demographics (like the Wii to families for example)

But most importantly, it means that our "voice" matters very little. We may wail and gnash our teeth at things like No used games and always online DRM but the public doesn't even know about those things, and probably doesn't care.

And this is scary. Things like this mean that despite what you may read from fans on Gaming sites like this, products like the XB1 and practices like persistent internet connection will probably be successful.

Perhaps I'm just being defeatist but it seems like nothing we do matters. The only way to change things is to get the "non-gamers" to care about things like these.

Alternatively, we can focus our efforts on an industry we DO have a major effect on.

Hellooooooooo, indies!

lacktheknack:
Alternatively, we can focus our efforts on an industry we DO have a major effect on.

Hellooooooooo, indies!

got that right. support the smaller developers and publishers out there, for the pc especially there are plenty of niche genres available

lacktheknack:
Alternatively, we can focus our efforts on an industry we DO have a major effect on.

Hellooooooooo, indies!

True enough. I pretty much only play niche handheld titles and Indie PC these days anyway.

You're not being defeatist, you're being realistic. Most gamers won't care about the things about the xbone that piss you off. They will be happy to "buy" a game and get their enjoyment out of it even if they can't sell it afterward.

Mind-boggling, isn't it? I am always surprised when I come out of the gaming closet at work enough to make a comment about DRM or day-1 DLC, and everyone looks at me like I suddenly started speaking Klingon. I think the number of people who care about these issues is growing though. As much as hard core game enthusiasts hate to admit it, casual gaming is responsible for roping in a TON of gaming converts in the last few years, and a portion of those move on to more in depth forms of the art. These folks are often more passionate about the issues than a dinosaur like me; after all, I've had a decade and a half to get used to the growing (and often ridiculous) trends in gaming, but the newbies are suddenly being hit in the wallet in a way they never expected from the games industry. Indie games are all well and good, and I definitely support them and their studios, but hopefully, as gaming evolves, our demographic will expand and the AAA publishers will be forced to listen up.

This is why I'm so glad I made the transition over to iOS gaming. I know a lot of people don't like Apple, and I see a lot of that whole "Those aren't REAL games" thing, but all I know is I get a lot of great titles for low prices, and it's very easy to contact the developers themselves and let your voice be heard.

I am truly disappointed in so many aspects right now. Just by reading a xbone or ps4 twitter feed gets me depressed. People pre-ordering because of Madden, others going on just graphics. I remember when many more people cared about game play, story, and just new ideas. But no, people are too focused on sports.Hardcore gamers and just people who truly give a damn about games, are becoming the minority at an alarming rate, and well things can only get worse from here on out.

By the way game footage doesn't equal game play.

One highlight I just saw the Order... lessens the punch a bit.

Eric the Orange:
I think it needs to be said. We, the people who keep up with gaming news, follow the industry and agonize and/or praise what happens are the minority of people who buy and play games.

I don't have actual numbers but us game enthusiasts are probably less than a quarter of the market. what this means is that we only really have niche games marketed towards us, the rest are marketed towards much larger demographics (like the Wii to families for example)

But most importantly, it means that our "voice" matters very little. We may wail and gnash our teeth at things like No used games and always online DRM but the public doesn't even know about those things, and probably doesn't care.

And this is scary. Things like this mean that despite what you may read from fans on Gaming sites like this, products like the XB1 and practices like persistent internet connection will probably be successful.

Perhaps I'm just being defeatist but it seems like nothing we do matters. The only way to change things is to get the "non-gamers" to care about things like these.

Bravo and well said although it needs to be said that even escapists as well informed as they are have fallen for hype anyway and bought stuff like D3 and Simcity online.

I miss the days when resale prevention was 'make the game so good you want to play it again and look forward to more from this developer'.

And I wouldn't have it any other way. I love following gaming news, everyone needs a hobby. Us Escapists are very passionate about this stuff, and although it manifests in fanboys, flame wars, and trolling, it shows we care. However I disagree with OP saying our voice is tiny and doesn't matter. I could list many examples of hardcore gamers influencing gaming through internet hate, see ME3 Extended Cut or the Aliens Colonial Marines fiasco. The industry is aware of hardcores, and the trick seems to be giving us enough to be satisfied while still creating a very casual friendly game.

Don't give up OP... we matter.

I think most gamers care more about these issues than you'd expect, once they get hit by them. The people I've talked to offline haven't been aware of the issues for the most part, but when I mention them there's often something thats a dealbreaker to em (if not the used games, then the constant online checking and slow install process that were put in place to enforce the used games shenanigans).

... Bravo OP. I'm not sarcastic or passive-aggressive here, I really mean it.

But the thing is, we need to stop acting defeatist about it.

What will we get out of being defeatist? More bans on used games? Online DRM that's really nasty? An over saturated market full of one genre? I ask again, what is the point of being defeatist?

Here is where I propose how to stop acting defeatist. I'm doing this as I LOVE games. Games capture a magic that any other form of media fails in some respect. Would any of the classics (*insert classics here*) work in any other medium? No, as the experience that they give will not have the same impact as of it was a game.

I'll keep this short, as I understand that time ticks by for everyone all the same.

First: we must unite. Put aside the differences that we all see in each other for utterly petty reasons, whether it would be a choice between console or PC, or whether women are being represented correctly in games, cast them all away. Nothing will come of endless bickering over anything; the most that will is change for the worse.

Second, stop bitching. You know what Jim said about bitching, yes? You remember, right? Forget it all, and plan reasonable responses. Do not act as the angry elephant in the room when you can simply and calmly explain the issue you have with the medium of gaming. We, as gamers, should not appear as zealots of our games, but more refined aficionados. We need to show that we know what we're talking about and be able to do so in a professional manner.

But all of those controversies, Silent! What to do about them?

If we all can't be reasonably talking with others, the controversy will only aggravate. Take the sexism debates as sometimes, it appears that no one is ready to discuss this in a reasonable manner as everyone else is flinging vitrolic statements at each other. I (along with many other people) expect toddlers to do that, much less the gaming industry.

My final point is that we should act. Calmly responding and getting together is all good, but if we don't actually do something, we're wasting space in the end. That DRM being rather disastrous? Tell the publisher calmly why it's a hassle. A new system from Valve or any other company is top notch, but could be better? Respond. Criticize without throwing vitrol, reasonably. Is one game doing something that can only spell doom for it? Respond to the developers. They're human. They undergo stress and all of our human feelings that we have as consumers, so talk with them reasonably.

I believe that all of us, regardless of what we believe, should unite and speak out. I doubt that anything will happen if we sit here in the position that we are now, fighting like children in mud. We should all take a step back, breathe, and then act. Nothing will come from this industry if we are not ready to act.

That is all I have to say on this matter.

*Steps off of his soapbox.*

 

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