Overly coddled by a game

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Pink Gregory:
I have to say I'm getting pretty tired of being reminded what simple button presses do in loading screens..

Howabout constant popups in game, like GTA V and Saints Row 3?

Zhukov:
The XCOM Enemy Unknown tutorial was pretty terrible.

100% scripted. As in it forces you to make the exact moves it wants and all the hit/miss rolls are predetermined.

Just fucking give me control already!

It's just one mission, and you CAN choose not to do it. Which I always do now, since it gives you 4 specialists at the end instead of just one.

aegix drakan:

Zhukov:
The XCOM Enemy Unknown tutorial was pretty terrible.

100% scripted. As in it forces you to make the exact moves it wants and all the hit/miss rolls are predetermined.

Just fucking give me control already!

It's just one mission, and you CAN choose not to do it. Which I always do now, since it gives you 4 specialists at the end instead of just one.

I'm not saying it ruined the game or anything, it was just a a shit tutorial.

I actually found this coddling experience once while playing Dark Souls of all games. When facing the Bed of Chaos, it is defeated by attacking each of its 3 weak points once. However, if you die (which is very easy if this is your first time), you don't lose any of the progress you made. Because getting to the weak points is much easier than surviving right after hitting one, this fight suddenly becomes a cakewalk as long as you're okay with making the trek to the boss area 3+ times.

MBergman:

j0frenzy:
Could've just been a bug where you triggered the destruction and then died so the game respawned you after that check point rather than deciding it was too hard for you. Bugs happen.

I did occur more than once, that the game cleared and obstacle for me instead of me doing it. So it wasn't a bug, but I think you're right in what you're saying about checkpoints, the game was just far too generous in how it placed it's checkpoints, and registered a challenge as beat when it clearly wasn't, because of one reason or another. It didn't always to it mind you, many hard bits I had to clear all on my own. I do think the developer could have been stricter with how it placed some of the game's checkpoints however, because as they are now it's just frustrating.

So true. One of the easiest ways to get through the game is by NOT leveling up ever. I called it the Insomnia method, since you had to sleep in order to level up.

"coddling" is not the best term I would use.

Guys, I know a lot of us are all getting some strange pride boner out of being a "hardcore" gamer and all, but seriously, stop it.

Sometimes, games are made with you in mind. sometimes, the games are made with the greater mass market in mind. And let me tell you, one of the largest effects of an industry being a mass market product is that they want to streamline the way people enjoy it so they can get to the core content WITHOUT making them bang their head against the wall.

You guys need to understand that not everyone is going to want to play a game that has them fail 100 times before they have to learn that one crucial button combo that gets them through the next segment. In fact, I dare say MOST people now a days don't have time for that.

Think of it like movies. Now, a studio can either make a super high brow movie that is all contemplative and asks a lot of interesting introspective questions and said movie will have GREAT critical acclaim, like say, the Social Network. You will probably make money off of it, since, you know, Oscar baits generally do. Or you can make another Transformers, a dumb, stupid, and utterly meaningless piece of explosion porn, and make 10 times that for probably the same budget.

If you want to reach a wider audience, you need to be willing to bring the entry barrier down a little. If every game you see now was like back in the 80s-90s where there is a pretty high difficulty ramp up, you're not going to be able to sell to anybody except teenage boys who have ample amount of free time on their hands.

When the average gamer is 34 years old, that's a lot of disposable income you're leaving on the table by just courting teenage men.

Mario & Luigi: Dream Team. I appreciate tutorials, I really do. But it's a little overboard when I'm getting tutorials for something like badges, 5 hours into the game. >_>

Especially when you already gave me that same tutorial 2 hours earlier.

gamer_parent:
"coddling" is not the best term I would use.

Guys, I know a lot of us are all getting some strange pride boner out of being a "hardcore" gamer and all, but seriously, stop it.

Sometimes, games are made with you in mind. sometimes, the games are made with the greater mass market in mind. And let me tell you, one of the largest effects of an industry being a mass market product is that they want to streamline the way people enjoy it so they can get to the core content WITHOUT making them bang their head against the wall.

You guys need to understand that not everyone is going to want to play a game that has them fail 100 times before they have to learn that one crucial button combo that gets them through the next segment. In fact, I dare say MOST people now a days don't have time for that.

Think of it like movies. Now, a studio can either make a super high brow movie that is all contemplative and asks a lot of interesting introspective questions and said movie will have GREAT critical acclaim, like say, the Social Network. You will probably make money off of it, since, you know, Oscar baits generally do. Or you can make another Transformers, a dumb, stupid, and utterly meaningless piece of explosion porn, and make 10 times that for probably the same budget.

If you want to reach a wider audience, you need to be willing to bring the entry barrier down a little. If every game you see now was like back in the 80s-90s where there is a pretty high difficulty ramp up, you're not going to be able to sell to anybody except teenage boys who have ample amount of free time on their hands.

When the average gamer is 34 years old, that's a lot of disposable income you're leaving on the table by just courting teenage men.

I agree with what you're saying, and I appreciate that not everybody wants the same level of difficulty as I might. At the same time though, if I do decide to pick the Hard difficulty I'd like to be challenged, and in general Uncharted 3 did give a good challenge, which makes it all the more frustrating when it just skips things all of a sudden.

All I'm saying is that if I decided to play on Hard, don't start lowering the difficulty just because I die a few times, that's even more frustrating than dying. If I want it easier I'll go to the options menu all by myself thank you very much.

gamer_parent:
"coddling" is not the best term I would use.

Guys, I know a lot of us are all getting some strange pride boner out of being a "hardcore" gamer and all, but seriously, stop it.

Sometimes, games are made with you in mind. sometimes, the games are made with the greater mass market in mind. And let me tell you, one of the largest effects of an industry being a mass market product is that they want to streamline the way people enjoy it so they can get to the core content WITHOUT making them bang their head against the wall.

You guys need to understand that not everyone is going to want to play a game that has them fail 100 times before they have to learn that one crucial button combo that gets them through the next segment. In fact, I dare say MOST people now a days don't have time for that.

Think of it like movies. Now, a studio can either make a super high brow movie that is all contemplative and asks a lot of interesting introspective questions and said movie will have GREAT critical acclaim, like say, the Social Network. You will probably make money off of it, since, you know, Oscar baits generally do. Or you can make another Transformers, a dumb, stupid, and utterly meaningless piece of explosion porn, and make 10 times that for probably the same budget.

If you want to reach a wider audience, you need to be willing to bring the entry barrier down a little. If every game you see now was like back in the 80s-90s where there is a pretty high difficulty ramp up, you're not going to be able to sell to anybody except teenage boys who have ample amount of free time on their hands.

When the average gamer is 34 years old, that's a lot of disposable income you're leaving on the table by just courting teenage men.

Games should'nt be stripped of complexity or difficulty just so people who don't like to think can get into them.Sorry to say this without being offensive but not every game has to appeal to the idiots who hate games that require the player to think.

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