You know that thing where female character = puzzle and male character = action?

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I was thinking about certain games in which you're given the choice of playing either as a male or female character, and usually the female character's story focues less on action and more on puzzles/exploration, while the male character's story is usually the most action-heavy. Like in the first couple of Resident Evil games (Jill/Chris, Claire/Leon) or Alone in the Dark: New Nightmare (Aline/Edward). I'm sure I'm forgetting quite a few more and I'll probably edit more examples later.

Anyway, can you think of games in which the reverse is true? Female character's story focues more on action while the male character's story is more puzzle oriented?

Resident Evil 2 didn't feel that way to me. Actually pretty even to me. No matter on which disc or reverse save game you select Mister X is a pain for both Claire and Leon with one of the best timed jump scares in video games, and Birkin as a BOW does significant health damage.

gargantual:
Resident Evil 2 didn't feel that way to me. Actually pretty even to me. No matter on which disc or reverse save game you select Mister X is a pain for both Claire and Leon with one of the best timed jump scares in video games, and Birkin as a BOW does significant health damage.

Maybe RE2 wasn't the best example. I recall several guides recommend playing as Claire first, meaning you face Mr. X as Leon (who is the one that gets the shotgun by the way).

RE1 is more poignant. Jill has immediate access to the shotgun (Chris goes a long while before getting it), she has the lockpick ability that bypasses all those pesky Rusty Key sidequests, has more inventory space so that she can pack more stuff and hazard less trips between item boxes, and I believe has way more ammo in her campaign. Chris's campaign is harder by every definition of the word. And generally speaking I get the impression that a lot of games save the "hard" version for the male character.

Johnny Novgorod:

gargantual:
Resident Evil 2 didn't feel that way to me. Actually pretty even to me. No matter on which disc or reverse save game you select Mister X is a pain for both Claire and Leon with one of the best timed jump scares in video games, and Birkin as a BOW does significant health damage.

Maybe RE2 wasn't the best example. I recall several guides recommend playing as Claire first, meaning you face Mr. X as Leon (who is the one that gets the shotgun by the way).

RE1 is more poignant. Jill has immediate access to the shotgun (Chris goes a long while before getting it), she has the lockpick ability that bypasses all those pesky Rusty Key sidequests, has more inventory space so that she can pack more stuff and hazard less trips between item boxes, and I believe has way more ammo in her campaign. Chris's campaign is harder by every definition of the word. And generally speaking I get the impression that a lot of games save the "hard" version for the male character.

That's right. I forgot about that. Oh well I guess I just went in cold back in '98. Started taking occasional peeks at the guides when I couldn't find the gears for that damned clock in the attic. I remember being ashamed at myself how long I took to find it too. glassed every damn room.

For RE1 I guess it'd also have to do a bit with their endurance. I don't remember who I died with faster, chris or jill but they did redeem her a bit in Nemesis combat wise. Where you have to take on old baddie mostly by herself 8 or so times. If you count all the fight or flight encounters along with the boss fights, (albeit in a tubetop and skirt). (hubba hubba) But at least this is when the counter dodge, rolls and elbows were introduced. I am much thankful for the inclusion of those.

Perhaps it's because I'm replaying it right now, but Bioshock Infinite also does this. Booker is the one with the guns, Elizabeth is the supporter/lockpicker. I wouldn't go so far as to say that makes BI anti-women, on the contrary Elizabeth is by far the more powerful of the two. And the ending also makes it clear that Booker kind of had to be Booker and Elizabeth had to be Elizabeth, due to the story's relationship with Bioshock 1.

To give an example of a game that DOESN'T do this, Emmy in the Professor Layton games tends to be very gung-ho and beats up the bad guys when she gets the chance. Layton does beat her combat skills with fencing, but hand to hand she's the winner, and I'm pretty sure she's given more chances to beat people up than Layton is given chances to fence.

Lilani:
Perhaps it's because I'm replaying it right now, but Bioshock Infinite also does this. Booker is the one with the guns, Elizabeth is the supporter/lockpicker. I wouldn't go so far as to say that makes BI anti-women, on the contrary Elizabeth is by far the more powerful of the two. And the ending also makes it clear that Booker kind of had to be Booker and Elizabeth had to be Elizabeth, due to the story's relationship with Bioshock 1.

To give an example of a game that DOESN'T do this, Emmy in the Professor Layton games tends to be very gung-ho and beats up the bad guys when she gets the chance. Layton does beat her combat skills with fencing, but hand to hand she's the winner, and I'm pretty sure she's given more chances to beat people up than Layton is given chances to fence.

Do you get to play as Elizabeth though in the BioShock games? I was thinking more along the lines of playable characters.

Johnny Novgorod:

Lilani:
Perhaps it's because I'm replaying it right now, but Bioshock Infinite also does this. Booker is the one with the guns, Elizabeth is the supporter/lockpicker. I wouldn't go so far as to say that makes BI anti-women, on the contrary Elizabeth is by far the more powerful of the two. And the ending also makes it clear that Booker kind of had to be Booker and Elizabeth had to be Elizabeth, due to the story's relationship with Bioshock 1.

To give an example of a game that DOESN'T do this, Emmy in the Professor Layton games tends to be very gung-ho and beats up the bad guys when she gets the chance. Layton does beat her combat skills with fencing, but hand to hand she's the winner, and I'm pretty sure she's given more chances to beat people up than Layton is given chances to fence.

Do you get to play as Elizabeth though in the BioShock games? I was thinking more along the lines of playable characters.

Yep the burial at sea DLC. You play as Booker in the first half Elizabeth in the second. Booker is RAWWW shooty shoty. Elizabeth is sneaky sneaky.

Senran Kagura is very much not puzzle, short of finding an item in a level on occassion, and figuring who's ass to whoop first. Every playable character is a female.

Koei makes a ton of games where there's little to no puzzles, and the women fight on the field equal to guys.

Bayonetta is not puzzley. Max Anarchy/Anarchy Reigns has women mauling along side the men.

As mentioned, Layton is very puzzle oriented as is Phoenix Wright, I'd say.

Brain Age is hosted by a man who helps sharpen your mind with puzzles, so does that count?

Scribblenauts counts as a male lead in a puzzle game, IMO, though unmasked is kinda actioney. the combat kinda sucks as it's easy to thwack the wrong person at times, but yeah. Sure, you can eventually switch to women in the console versions at the least.

Kind of a short list, I guess, and I hope it fits the theme of the thread.

I think the trope of women being problem solvers in less physical ways is kinda going out the window. I do know it existed, though.

Women still can't shake the whole women are rogues, archers, healers, and mages or what ever the era's equivalents are, though.

Females tend to get less brute strength gameplay.

But more finesse and dexterity combat. they get just as much action just a different type

take lolipop chainsaw hack and slash. but more a multicombo agility style than max dps single strokes

Rebel_Raven:
Senran Kagura is very much not puzzle, short of finding an item in a level on occassion, and figuring who's ass to whoop first. Every playable character is a female.

Koei makes a ton of games where there's little to no puzzles, and the women fight on the field equal to guys.

Bayonetta is not puzzley. Max Anarchy/Anarchy Reigns has women mauling along side the men.

As mentioned, Layton is very puzzle oriented as is Phoenix Wright, I'd say.

Brain Age is hosted by a man who helps sharpen your mind with puzzles, so does that count?

Scribblenauts counts as a male lead in a puzzle game, IMO, though unmasked is kinda actioney. the combat kinda sucks as it's easy to thwack the wrong person at times, but yeah. Sure, you can eventually switch to women in the console versions at the least.

Kind of a short list, I guess, and I hope it fits the theme of the thread.

I think the trope of women being problem solvers in less physical ways is kinda going out the window. I do know it existed, though.

Women still can't shake the whole women are rogues, archers, healers, and mages or what ever the era's equivalents are, though.

I was thinking specifically of games where you can choose between playing as a male or female character, and the difference is usually that the male story has more action and the female story has more "puzzle elements".

Johnny Novgorod:

Rebel_Raven:
Senran Kagura is very much not puzzle, short of finding an item in a level on occassion, and figuring who's ass to whoop first. Every playable character is a female.

Koei makes a ton of games where there's little to no puzzles, and the women fight on the field equal to guys.

Bayonetta is not puzzley. Max Anarchy/Anarchy Reigns has women mauling along side the men.

As mentioned, Layton is very puzzle oriented as is Phoenix Wright, I'd say.

Brain Age is hosted by a man who helps sharpen your mind with puzzles, so does that count?

Scribblenauts counts as a male lead in a puzzle game, IMO, though unmasked is kinda actioney. the combat kinda sucks as it's easy to thwack the wrong person at times, but yeah. Sure, you can eventually switch to women in the console versions at the least.

Kind of a short list, I guess, and I hope it fits the theme of the thread.

I think the trope of women being problem solvers in less physical ways is kinda going out the window. I do know it existed, though.

Women still can't shake the whole women are rogues, archers, healers, and mages or what ever the era's equivalents are, though.

I was thinking specifically of games where you can choose between playing as a male or female character, and the difference is usually that the male story has more action and the female story has more "puzzle elements".

Oh. Dang, that's a lot harder. I honestly can't think of one where the male has the puzzles and the woman is actioney. Feels like there'd be some out there, and I wanna say I ran into at least one, but for the life of me, I can't remember it.

Johnny Novgorod:

gargantual:
Resident Evil 2 didn't feel that way to me. Actually pretty even to me. No matter on which disc or reverse save game you select Mister X is a pain for both Claire and Leon with one of the best timed jump scares in video games, and Birkin as a BOW does significant health damage.

Maybe RE2 wasn't the best example. I recall several guides recommend playing as Claire first, meaning you face Mr. X as Leon (who is the one that gets the shotgun by the way).

RE1 is more poignant. Jill has immediate access to the shotgun (Chris goes a long while before getting it), she has the lockpick ability that bypasses all those pesky Rusty Key sidequests, has more inventory space so that she can pack more stuff and hazard less trips between item boxes, and I believe has way more ammo in her campaign. Chris's campaign is harder by every definition of the word. And generally speaking I get the impression that a lot of games save the "hard" version for the male character.

Or maybe Jill is just prepared and Chris is an idiot : P

To be fair, RE was one of the first series I can think of to give a female character a standalone title, and do it with respect. Twice in a row, actually, with RE3 followed by Code Veronica.

OT: I think Kingdom Hearts Birth by Sleep qualifies. Aqua was hands down the best fighter in the game, both in terms of gameplay and in canon. She beats her male friend Terra at the beginning, then gets sent to retrieve her two moron friends. She's also the most level headed and mature. She saves venitas, beats the big bad, goes on a quest to save her friend, fights and defeats the final boss, who is also her possessed best friend, and finally sacrifices herself. She then survives, alone, in a hellish world of darkness for over a decade. Not bad, if you ask me.

I'm hard-pressed to come up with any titles that haven't already been mentioned. About the only one that comes close is Lego Indiana Jones. Indy is the only character who can use a whip, but every other playable character, whether male or female, stand equal in combat, and, with the right tools, puzzle-solving. In fact, female characters have the advantage here because they can do everything just as well as the guys AND they can jump higher and farther.

Plus... you get to play as Elsa. Bonus!

Action girl and puzzle guy? Can't think of any off the top of my head.

To be fair, I can't really think of any where its action dude and puzzle girl either.

I can think of a couple where it's action dude and stealth girl though.

I'm going to say because if they get attacked one of a few things happens in a female lead combat focused game.

They get accused of

She's just fan service and not a real character.

She's a man with breasts

Violence itself is sexist so it's a sexist game
(this last one is related to new age 2nd wave feminists and the extremists present corrupting the one of the original principals of 2nd wave feminism which pushed for women to fight inequality by non violent means but has been corrupted to be Violence = sexist because it opposes feminist belief.)

Or maybe it's more an issue of perceived demographics for the games and the mistaken belief that people want the main character in a game to be a closer representation of them and the whole 40:60 market split.

I'm trying to come up with any examples. Actually, I'm trying to remember the games I've played that split levels between male and female characters (never played the ResiEvil series). The only ones coming readily to mind are Tenchu: Shadow Assassins (no difference between Ayame and Rikimaru) and Devil May Cry 2. And the only real differences between Lucia and Dante's levels are different final bosses (of Argoslax felt more "puzzley" than possessed Arius) and Lucia having swimming levels.

Maybe Trine would count? Except the female rogue's playstyle is more mixed, as opposed to the male warrior's combat focus and the male wizard's physics objects.

There was a Tomb Raider/Uncharted style game in the PS1 or PS2 days I swear was like this. The reverse. It come to mind for anyone?

Unfortunately, I can't help beyond that.

Rebel_Raven:

Bayonetta is not puzzley.

There's no male option in Bayonetta though, is there?

Women still can't shake the whole women are rogues, archers, healers, and mages or what ever the era's equivalents are, though.

It's weird to me, because it's always jived with my play style. So I simultaneously recognise the stereotype and employed it to its fullest.

Though I prefer games where you can select a character and then play however the heck you like.

The_Kodu:
I'm going to say because if they get attacked one of a few things happens in a female lead combat focused game.

They get accused of

She's just fan service and not a real character.

She's a man with breasts

Violence itself is sexist so it's a sexist game

The claim that these complaints are made occur more than the actual complaints. And usually from a smaller group of people. Weird.

Well, If I where to really grasp for straws, In Sly Cooper 3 ( and kinda 4), Carmelita's game play segments are usually more gruff action oriented, while Sly's, Bently's, and sometimes Murray's are more about under handedness, manipulation form shadows, and just in general non-direct confrontation. Not counting the boss fights of course.

Again, real straw grabbing. I really cannot think of a game where in a male/female duo, the male is more about the mind and the girl is the muscle.

I kinda want to throw this under the bus as too specific, but there are clearly enough examples of the contrary to see.

Fox12:
To be fair, RE was one of the first series I can think of to give a female character a standalone title, and do it with respect. Twice in a row, actually, with RE3 followed by Code Veronica.

Hey man, don't forget about Regina. She's not in Resi, but it's more or less the same.

Johnny Novgorod:
Maybe RE2 wasn't the best example. I recall several guides recommend playing as Claire first, meaning you face Mr. X as Leon (who is the one that gets the shotgun by the way).

Claire does get all the shittiest guns for some reason; Less ammo per handgun clip, the grenade launcher, and the bowgun. Meanwhile Leon gets 5 more bullets per handgun clip, the shotgun, and the mugnum magnum. Not only are these weapons already way better than Claire's, but he also gets to upgrade each of them into super forms.

Well, your simply seeing gender roles in the video games. In real life men max out as being stronger, and more physically capable pound for pound (not to mention being larger as well) and as a lot of people have pointed out and even analyzed in various books and such, men and women have different tendencies, men do tend to be a lot more aggressive on average though that is not an absolute. As a result it's sort of a no-brainer that if your setting up two characters and want them to be different that your going to start with the gender differences and tend to think of the dude going down the more physical and combative path. I don't think this is really all that sexist unless your making the female path in some way obviously inferior or the character overall less capable.

That said, there are plenty of examples in fantasy and science fiction where the girl is the crazy-combat monster and the guy is more passive. If you look at say Tenchi Muyo for example, Tenchi himself despite having a lot of latent power that doesn't typically come out until the 11th hour is surrounded by a bunch of girls who are massively more powerful than him, and he actually plays their damsel in distress. The funny thing is that despite being a complete reversal of the usual tropes, where you'd say have a bunch of Knights competing over the same princess and recueing her (before she does something cool at the end) this and similar works get dismissed as Harem animes and such. Now you might be thinking "But Therumancer, this is about video games". The point of this is that a LOT of video games have been based on anime franchises and such, many of which don't make it to the US (or are very expensive imports) and follow the series they represent. "Ordinary high school boy meets super girl" is a pretty typical anime plot.

I'll also say that it's hard to really give answers in the sense of "games that have you choose a path with a male or female character" since not a whole lot of games actually do that. Most of the games I know of that do that kind of thing tend to wind up having the characters both be more or less parallel polymaths. For example going back to things like the ancient "Star Ocean 2" you had a dude who fought with a sword and used magic, and a girl that did martial arts and used magic, you could change some of the quests depending on who your lead was, but you wound up having both in your party as the story progressed, and they were both equally powerful as I remember, but were actually eclipsed in the post-game theorycrafting by various characters you pick up on the way.

I haven't played it yet, but I think the main male character in "Tales Of Xilia" is supposed to be a medical student, while the female character is a spirit-based battle mage, which probably fits the bill since I think your supposed to pick one story path or the other.

In "Trinity Universe" you wind up choosing which storyline to play, and the characters meet up as the game progresses. To beat it though you need to do both storylines though. In that one the female character is a Valkyrie/Goddess with a bad attitude and a sword, and the male character is a somewhat detached renegade demon lord who takes little seriously ("The Devil Dog King!") and for the most part walks around acting like a lazy goofus while leaving his servant to take care of most things for him... he is of course hugely powerful though which is kind of the punch line.

In "Threads Of Fate" the male character is a shapeshifter, and the female character is a far more aggressive (and outright psychotic) battle mage. I suppose technically the guy does carry an axe as I remember, and the girl has hoops, but in actual play she's the one who is aggressively blasting stuff apart.

To be honest I tend to care more about the game chemistry and how things turn out rather than who gets to do what and whether something might be sexist. To put it bluntly over the years we've seen shows like "Relic Hunter", a low budget late night show that managed to last 4 years where Tia Carerra played a female version of Indiana Jones and dragged a bumbling sidekick named Nigel to the four corners of the earth where he became the butt of probably 90% of the show's frequent humor, and of course perhaps most recently things like "Castle" where Nathan Fillion is pretty much the rich-writer sidekick and laugh factory for a female supercop. There is nothing wrong with this kind of thing, when it's done well, and that includes when women wind up in the sidekick/entertainment role. People project way too much politics into it and tend to not keep track of the other side very well.

I'll also second that I think Chris was a definite "hard mode" for the first Resident Evil. In playing "The Director's Cut" (I think it was). I thought it was kind of unfair that the dude starts out with a knife and pretty much nothing else. Jill gets to start with a gun, a knife, a health restorer (if I remember) and Barry following her around as an "autosolve" for at least once trap the infamous "Jill Sandwich"... oh and the lockpicking. To be honest, this is why nobody should make fun of Mr. Redfield's huge arms on the cover of RE5, the man earned those guns the hard way. :)

Resident Evil 4 does this- however it is explained in the plot- Leon is the operative sent in to get Ashley, Ashley is a frightened teenage girl with no prior combat experience. It is very damsel in distress-y, but I believe she can occasionally kill the enemies.

Zachary Amaranth:

The claim that these complaints are made occur more than the actual complaints. And usually from a smaller group of people. Weird.

Now are you sure about that ?

It just seems very odd to me that people seem to claim people complain about the complaint more than the actual complaint gets raised by others.

Also damned if they do, damned if they don't and pressured by idiot publishers could easily mean they just don't want to do it because they'll feel bad no matter what the intention.

Woah, I was about to respond to a post by Therumancer. That was close.

rosac:
Resident Evil 4 does this- however it is explained in the plot- Leon is the operative sent in to get Ashley, Ashley is a frightened teenage girl with no prior combat experience. It is very damsel in distress-y, but I believe she can occasionally kill the enemies.

Let's not excuse stuff because of the plot. it's nice when things make sense in context, but let's not overlook when the same context is used over and over and over again.

Also, Ada Wong was in that game. Honestly, Resident Evil is probably one of the better series in terms of female characters. It just needs better writing.

Trine. The thief (archer who swings around all over the screen with a hookshot) is a female whereas the wizard (puzzle guy who makes boxes and platforms and moves things) is a male. The knight is more middle ground, he has a sword but his main tool is his shield, so he plays more defensively than the thief who is always on the offensive.

In turok 3, you can play as either a woman or a man.
Where the guy gets a sniper rifle, the gal gets a minigun.
She'll get all the heavy in your face guns while he gets all the precise, more skill based ones.

In alien swarm, the biggest in your face rofldamage character is female and the best medic/tech guy is male.

In bonfire, the bulky knight and the damage only pyromancer are female and the support-ish wizard and the healing monk are male.

Fatal Frame 3. Women according to the game's lore simply have higher spiritual power or something which is reflected in them having high attack power. The male character as a result wants to avoid guys like rope man and run away as his attack power is so naff due to being...well male. He has higher health and I recall him being able to move heavy stuff to open up some paths.

That fit?

Well, I remember Atelier Iris 2 as a game where that happens, though near the end the female pro joins you and she's pretty useful.

Lilani:
Perhaps it's because I'm replaying it right now, but Bioshock Infinite also does this. Booker is the one with the guns, Elizabeth is the supporter/lockpicker. I wouldn't go so far as to say that makes BI anti-women, on the contrary Elizabeth is by far the more powerful of the two. And the ending also makes it clear that Booker kind of had to be Booker and Elizabeth had to be Elizabeth, due to the story's relationship with Bioshock 1.

Doesn't that make it anti-men? Women are the ones with the brains, men are just a hulking mass of muscles only useful for smashing things.

OT: There's a 90s game I used to own called Bureau 13, sort of an adventure/RPG hybrid. There are 6 characters:
H - Isaac Richards, the Hacker
M - Delilah Littlepanther, the Mech
P - Father Jonathan Blank, the Priest
T - Jimmy Suttle, the Thief
V - Alexander Keltin, the Vampire
W - Selma Gray, the Witch
I think you have to choose two characters. From memory, the female Mech can just go around smashing everything, while the male characters like the Priest and Thief are weaker and have to pick locks and solve puzzles. Not sure about the Witch.

rosac:
Resident Evil 4 does this- however it is explained in the plot- Leon is the operative sent in to get Ashley, Ashley is a frightened teenage girl with no prior combat experience. It is very damsel in distress-y, but I believe she can occasionally kill the enemies.


Thanks to a weird glitch. Oh, look children, a panty shot. Otherwise she's got to run and hide in a bin; she's complete powerless aside from cutscenes and special events.

I can't really name many, but I'm sure there are lots. You could probably argue that the Pyro from Team Fortress 2 is female (judging from the purse in their locker) but that's very subjective, and their play style is a lot more strategic than some of the other classes.

rosac:
Resident Evil 4 does this- however it is explained in the plot- Leon is the operative sent in to get Ashley, Ashley is a frightened teenage girl with no prior combat experience. It is very damsel in distress-y, but I believe she can occasionally kill the enemies.

You take control of her for a brief chapter and yes, she can kill enemies with a contextual attack. But I was going for a more classic approach of choosing whom to play as throughout the entire game.

I want to say Zelda, but there's no gender choice. Link is a bit of a blank slate though (you could swap him out for a chick, and it wouldn't make much of a difference to me), aside from Wind Waker Link, who actually has a personality and believable motivations. Also it's an even blend of puzzle and action, so that's another reason why it might not count.

Zachary Amaranth:
There was a Tomb Raider/Uncharted style game in the PS1 or PS2 days I swear was like this. The reverse. It come to mind for anyone?

Unfortunately, I can't help beyond that.

Rebel_Raven:

Bayonetta is not puzzley.

There's no male option in Bayonetta though, is there?

Women still can't shake the whole women are rogues, archers, healers, and mages or what ever the era's equivalents are, though.

It's weird to me, because it's always jived with my play style. So I simultaneously recognise the stereotype and employed it to its fullest.

Though I prefer games where you can select a character and then play however the heck you like.

I do agree with you.

I don't mind playing with the trope now and then, but sometimes I just wanna hammer mooks, and go berserk in a game.

captcha: teflon president

Lilani:
Perhaps it's because I'm replaying it right now, but Bioshock Infinite also does this. Booker is the one with the guns, Elizabeth is the supporter/lockpicker. I wouldn't go so far as to say that makes BI anti-women, on the contrary Elizabeth is by far the more powerful of the two. And the ending also makes it clear that Booker kind of had to be Booker and Elizabeth had to be Elizabeth, due to the story's relationship with Bioshock 1.

To give an example of a game that DOESN'T do this, Emmy in the Professor Layton games tends to be very gung-ho and beats up the bad guys when she gets the chance. Layton does beat her combat skills with fencing, but hand to hand she's the winner, and I'm pretty sure she's given more chances to beat people up than Layton is given chances to fence.

In the end I think it's about personal preferences when it comes to conquering obstacles. For example, I pretty much prefer the puzzle/stealth approach over the guns-blazing one, and think the latter is rather one-dimensional and simplistic.

So from my perspective, Elizabeth is the one with the traits I value more, and Booker is the "dumb muscle" for the lack of a better expression.

Not that I have a problem with that, and far from me thinking that games imply women are smart cookies who can think outside the box, and men are dumb simpletons who figure any problem can be solved if you hit/shoot/mangle it hard enough.

Vegosiux:
In the end I think it's about personal preferences when it comes to conquering obstacles. For example, I pretty much prefer the puzzle/stealth approach over the guns-blazing one, and think the latter is rather one-dimensional and simplistic.

So from my perspective, Elizabeth is the one with the traits I value more, and Booker is the "dumb muscle" for the lack of a better expression.

Yeah, I feel like some part of should be a bit miffed at the idea that women can't handle guns or whatever, but honestly as long as they're competent I don't think it's saying anything of the sort. I often used Elizabeth for stealth in Infinite, using her tears to either make cover or distractions so I could hide in a corner and snipe enemies from afar with either the hand cannon or sniper rifle. And the vigors I used most often were possession and shock jockey, to keep enemies distracted and still while I fling bullets and shit from my hidey hole. I resented the battles out in the open that forced me to be all gung-ho and exposed, I felt out of my element and like I wasn't using my resources efficiently.

well honestly lets face the facts

the people developing games are generally men, lead roles in development are pretty much male dominated which is one reason as to why males are more favoured in games than females

plus the main demographic is also male dominated however i'll say that i cannot confirm this as many sources provide many different results, for instance a good few sources show that females make up more than half of gamers

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/134028-ESA-Survey-Finds-Nearly-Half-of-All-U-S-Gamers-Are-Female

just as an example

long story short, overall its 50 : 50 but because the research is basic its pretty much useless (since it never defines what a game is nor what criteria you have to have to be a "gamer")

overall if you feel that females are unrepresented then what exactly is stopping you from making this wonderful game of a kick ass female protagonist?

you can moan and groan that harry potter was not a girl but nothing should change how a writer makes their story, the same should be applied to video games (of course within moderation)

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