How many combos do you actually use in Bayonetta?

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I'm never gonna bother remembering them. I prefer slower paced combat systems with a limited number of immediate attacks, like in Ocarina of Time, Dark Souls and I guess Chivalry. Combos feel like fluff to me.

Bayonetta isn't what I had hoped. On top of being bland, there are too many long cutscenes, for a story that's kind of shit so far.

I can't be hating. I saw my bro just play the opening cutscene before I got slightly bored and went to watch Trailer Park Boys today. What I could gather is Bayonetta turned from sexy Nun to sexy witchy angel hunter all in one scene while an exceptionally greasy Danny Devito mob character made snide remarks and later cowered in awe of the acrobatic fight scene breaking out. I just can't hate.

What you have to understand is that this is a very different type of fighting game than Zelda, Dark souls, or especially Chivalry. It's called a "spectacle" fighter like Devil May Cry and etc. It's not meant to be basic and supplementary to other gameplay elements. It's meant to be as flashy and involved as possible. It's definitely a different type of game, so it's understandable to not have to enjoy it all.

It's about the sexy too. We don't have to worry about SJW or feminazi tyranny here, real or imagined. It's all T&A, and it's all glorious.

Ezekiel:
I'm never gonna bother remembering them. I prefer slower paced combat systems with a limited number of immediate attacks, like in Ocarina of Time, Dark Souls and I guess Chivalry. Combos feel like fluff to me.

Bayonetta isn't what I had hoped. On top of being bland, there are too many long cutscenes, for a story that's kind of shit so far.

This is a totally different type of game, the gameplay is completely centered around killing stylishly rather than killing efficiently. You use as many different combos as possible because it raises your style meter, how stylish you were determines how much exp you get, which in turn allows you to get new weapons and combos, which you then use to increase how stylishly you're playing.

The difficulty isn't in beating the enemies, it's about beating the enemies and looking damn good doing it.

I found DMC, DMC4, DmC and MGR mediocre. I don't think the genre has much legitimacy. If I want a spectacle, I'll probably watch an action movie. I mean, "spectacle" implies it's about the visuals, so why even bother making a game of it? Foremost, I want to be engaged when I'm playing.

DMC3 used to be one of my favorite games. I played it on DMD, got all the secret orbs and played it for over a hundred hours on Turbo. But I can't get into it anymore. I quit after Agni and Rudra.

T&A? I think she's a badly designed character. She has her tiny head back really far when she's standing still, as if she's grossed out by something. Catwoman does the same thing with her shoulders and head in the Arkham games, and I hate it.
image

If her outfit is made out of her hair, why does it have zippers and all those pointless belts protruding like feathers from her arms. Seriously, what is it with Japanese character designers and belts?

The guns on her shoes would look better without handles. The barrels could be the heels, kind of like this: http://cdn.acidcow.com/pics/20101123/gun_shoes_03.jpg

Her run is graceless. For someone who's supposed to be stylish, I think she spreads her legs too much when she runs.
image
The intense movement of her hips when she walks looks painfully strenuous. If I saw a woman walk like that, even the most beautiful lady on Earth, I'd probably laugh.

At least they got the foot movement right with 2B and A2 in NieR: A.

Also, glasses aren't sexy. When I see glasses, I just think, "This person has a deficiency."

I am a competitive fighting game player so I am all about those complex combos. These games are all about creatively turning your foes into mincemeat and being the most stylish and badass possible in the process. It isn't about "how many" you use, obviously you use them all. I'm at a point of focusing on unique sequences or connecting specific ones off of specific other ones to get a longer juggle or to maximize damage.

so basically you are nitpicking, because you didnt like the game.

Bayonetta was a lot of fun regardless of whether you found the character sexy. you didn't really have to use a lot of odd combos, though it was fun to experiment.

K-sha:
so basically you are nitpicking, because you didnt like the game.

Bayonetta was a lot of fun regardless of whether you found the character sexy. you didn't really have to use a lot of odd combos, though it was fun to experiment.

You know what perhaps the worst thing about combos is? I have no idea what my character is gonna do as I chain button presses. So, when my character does an awesome attack all of a sudden, I feel like I'm not even in control. The rest of the time, I'm breaking up the momentum and repeating the same short moves because I can't be bothered to look at the combo list and memorize them.

I havent played Bayonetta, but in general terms of comboing, let me use Dynasty Warriors as an example.

Remembering combos literally is stupid. You need to be able to remember them with your fingers, not your head. I could not really tell you the combos I use for any specific character in a Dynasty Warriors game, but when I play them, I am better able to rely on multiple combos out of feeling them out. Fighting games too. Looking at a long string of X A X A B B A X BACK X Y is...intimidating, but if it feels good to use and you can remember that way, then well...thats how it should be.

The combos in Bayonetta are like 4-5 buttons presses and that's really it. There's even a PKP wicked weave combo. You wanna remember a few wicked weave combos so you can use them on command from certain directions like wicked weave from below to initiate a juggle. The mechanic that makes Bayonetta special is the dodge offset, which allows you to dodge in the middle of a combo to continue the combo after dodging instead of having to start over again. The game does a wonderful job of easing you into the mechanics as you go up difficulty levels. The Jeane fights teach to you wicked weave. You'll get a couple enemy encounters that are immune to witch time on normal to teach you to dodge offset and on hard, there's a lot more enemies immune to witch time, and non-stop infinite climax disables witch time completely forcing you to dodge offset for real real.

Bayonetta combat is so much deeper and satisfying than say Souls combat. You literally do the same thing over and over again in a Souls game (dodge/block, then attack) with the occasional boss forcing you to change things up. The different weapons in Bayonetta open up more playstyles than Souls as well, you can use freaking ice skates to freeze enemies in Bayonetta. The creativity the game allows for is really amazing as there's so many different and fun ways to dispatch of enemies.

Been a while since I played it but I remeber using two combos more than any other and they were the PKP (think) wicked weave combo with sword as hand weapon because it was fast to do had a huge range and was moderately powerful secondly there was the killgore switch combo which while not hard does take a little while to get used to in the heat of combat but the pay off is so worth it by far the most damaging combo in the game just be careful when you use it as it goes on a while leaving you open (although if you get good enough you can dodge and continue the combo providing you are not at its tail end).

As for the game I did not really get into it on normal but tried it on hard and was hooked as that is when it makes you time your attacks and dodges instead of just mindlessly let you get away with mashing buttons.

I have not played chivalry and I can see your preference in limited number of attacks but personally I think the combat in Ocarina is pretty bad while souls is little better. They work because in Ocarina I would say combat is not the main focus of the game. It plays a big part sure but its not really a focus so much as on puzzles and story while with the souls series it works because it punishes mistakes so hard and so you dont want a complex battle system on top as that is just going to exclude even more players.

I would also say its more about exploration. In souls combat is there to provide peril mostly not to be the spectacle in itself.

As for Bayonetta as a character I am not hugely keen on her design and the story in Bayonetta 1 is just garbage took me a few playthroughs before I could understand it. Its not even entertaining imo that said few games have made me feel so badass in combat as Bayonetta did there was nothing like starting a combo, dodging a bosses attack perfectly to activate witch time then completing the killgore switch combo and utterly devastating its face with my swarm of rockets.

You dont have to like it but many do and for my own 2 cents I still think Bayonetta and its sequel are the best games of their type in the market and thats against other heavy hitters like Ninja Gaiden (black and sigma 2) and DMC (1 and 3).

In short though you dont need to learn many combos just a handful as for which ones it depends on what weapons you like using.

Quite a few of 'em, since not all of them were all purpose combos - though I favoured the quick, spammy attacks when fighting, say, Grace and Glory, since any slow combos would just get my shit wrecked.

Every time I see this guy, he is complaining about something. Geez, maybe you should, I don't know, be less of a Negative Nancy, or something?

You said yourself that you don't like games like Devil May Cry, why bother with this one? I mean, I don't play RTS, I don't like RTS, I am not going to jump into Starcraft II and they say "man, this suckz".

OT: When I played it back when it was released, I used the majority of combos for guns and your basic sword, didn't use gauntlets, rocket launchers and ice skates because I didn't like how they feel.

As far as story goes, well, maybe you shouldn't have played Platinum game about striperific witch gunslinger while searching for bombastic story. In this game, the story basically exists only to give you some kind, any kind of a reason as to why do you have to fight the enemies.

Ezekiel:
You know what perhaps the worst thing about combos is? I have no idea what my character is gonna do as I chain button presses. So, when my character does an awesome attack all of a sudden, I feel like I'm not even in control. The rest of the time, I'm breaking up the momentum and repeating the same short moves because I can't be bothered to look at the combo list and memorize them.

If you refuse to play the game the way it's meant to be played then you can't really expect the game to be fun. If a combo is easy enough to do that it happens by accident, just learn it. That way you can either avoid it or do it on purpose and you'll be in control.

MHR:
greasy Danny Devito mob character

It's actually a parody of Joe Pesci.

OT; On the standard mobs, I mash "A" until they die, the bosses I do like to do the chain attacks because it puts them in a kind of stun lock that prevents them from executing some of their attacks. The combo bonuses are also very nice.

It only took me about 3 hours before I mostly fought for efficiency rather than any attempt of style, kinda bugs me that they rank me based on combo points as well as speed and damage taken. I always get lightning fast no damage but to get more combo points I need to mix it up. The Platinum games never did interest me in their desire to give you 50 combos as I only care about a handful. Oddly enough Devil may Cry 1 with its limited combat was a little more interesting than what it became and its spiritual successor Bayonetta, I've always preferred a small pool of moves with each new addition being substantial in combat or just COOL to look at. Anybody even use half the moves they start you off with in Revengeance either?

Ezekiel, I like and respect you, but at this point, if you don't like Bayonetta or anything DMC related, then stop playing them. The combos are useful and you can practice them in the loading screen. To practice them longer, you just hit the back button the 360, the "-" button on the Wii U, or the Select button on the PS3. The combos ain't that hard to remember, and Bayonetta uses pause combos very similarly to DMC. And unlike most action games of its sub-genre, their an huge emphasis on dodging. There is an item called Moon of Khala that let's you parry a la DMC 3/4's Royal Guard, but never have I played a game that put a lot of use dodging. Yes, there was Trickster, but in DMC3 at least, I found myself going for Swordmaster or Royalguard. Trickster I only used for certain bosses, and I did care much for Gunslinger.

I wear glasses too (farsighted) and I consider glasses sexy, even before wearing them. Then again, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

ProfMcStevie:
It only took me about 3 hours before I mostly fought for efficiency rather than any attempt of style, kinda bugs me that they rank me based on combo points as well as speed and damage taken.

Same. Feels like I'm back in school, passing with a bad grade. You passed the level, but it doesn't mean much because we gave you a bad score. I prefer one long continuous campaign over scored levels. When a level ends, I always feel like stopping, but I can play an action-adventure type game for hours and hours and hours straight. The best of both for me would be having a level selector but not letting you know when a level starts and ends as you're playing through the whole story.

Kinitawowi:
As somebody who wears glasses, FUCK YOU.

I'm nearsighted. I hate wearing glasses. I pretty much only wear them when I go to the cinema or drive. They get dirty and foggy easily, they reflect light and you always feel them. They're pretty impractical for a balletic fighter and just don't look good.

Maximum Bert:
Been a while since I played it but I remeber using two combos more than any other and they were the PKP (think) wicked weave combo with sword as hand weapon because it was fast to do had a huge range and was moderately powerful secondly there was the killgore switch combo which while not hard does take a little while to get used to in the heat of combat but the pay off is so worth it by far the most damaging combo in the game just be careful when you use it as it goes on a while leaving you open (although if you get good enough you can dodge and continue the combo providing you are not at its tail end).

As for the game I did not really get into it on normal but tried it on hard and was hooked as that is when it makes you time your attacks and dodges instead of just mindlessly let you get away with mashing buttons.

I have not played chivalry and I can see your preference in limited number of attacks but personally I think the combat in Ocarina is pretty bad while souls is little better. They work because in Ocarina I would say combat is not the main focus of the game. It plays a big part sure but its not really a focus so much as on puzzles and story while with the souls series it works because it punishes mistakes so hard and so you dont want a complex battle system on top as that is just going to exclude even more players.

I would also say its more about exploration. In souls combat is there to provide peril mostly not to be the spectacle in itself.

As for Bayonetta as a character I am not hugely keen on her design and the story in Bayonetta 1 is just garbage took me a few playthroughs before I could understand it. Its not even entertaining imo that said few games have made me feel so badass in combat as Bayonetta did there was nothing like starting a combo, dodging a bosses attack perfectly to activate witch time then completing the killgore switch combo and utterly devastating its face with my swarm of rockets.

You dont have to like it but many do and for my own 2 cents I still think Bayonetta and its sequel are the best games of their type in the market and thats against other heavy hitters like Ninja Gaiden (black and sigma 2) and DMC (1 and 3).

In short though you dont need to learn many combos just a handful as for which ones it depends on what weapons you like using.

I agree that Ocarina's combat isn't that good. I appreciate it mostly as an example of how to build combat systems up. Dark Souls owes a few things to Ocarina.

CoCage:
Ezekiel, I like and respect you, but at this point, if you don't like Bayonetta or anything DMC related, then stop playing them.

I haven't played a Platinum game that I've found downright bad. Bayonetta does seem better than MGR so far. Chapter 2 was kind of enjoyable in spite of everything.

Ezekiel:

K-sha:
so basically you are nitpicking, because you didnt like the game.

Bayonetta was a lot of fun regardless of whether you found the character sexy. you didn't really have to use a lot of odd combos, though it was fun to experiment.

You know what perhaps the worst thing about combos is? I have no idea what my character is gonna do as I chain button presses. So, when my character does an awesome attack all of a sudden, I feel like I'm not even in control. The rest of the time, I'm breaking up the momentum and repeating the same short moves because I can't be bothered to look at the combo list and memorize them.

You know how in loading screens you can still play in a sort of "training mode", that is there for a reason. :P

So yeah, what you ought to have done in the first room of the first area (and every time you get a new weapon) is sit there for 15 minutes and memorize what each combination of presses does. If you don't do that but just mindlessly button mash you're not actually playing the game.

Not a lot, just a few useful ones. If I remember correctly they have a "style" ranking on diffrent combos and it just seems to be bad design, I can get having time or health limit but a player shouldn't be judged badly on sticking to what works.

I played the demo of the original. It's the old school design philosophy in the vein of Ninja Gaiden where using style and flash seems to be the most important aspect of succeeding. I just don't care that much for it because it's just not my style, ironically enough. Flash and scoring just doesn't really impress me because it feels like more of an obstacle than the actual enemies you're supposed to be fighting; like the combo sequences are the real challenge and the enemies are an afterthought.

I did enjoy the original DMC though, and have fond memories of the first spider boss. I also played through the third "complete" edition but by that point I pretty much had my fill of that game style. By that point I was more into stuff like God of War and ultimately the Souls games.

hanselthecaretaker:
I played the demo of the original. It's the old school design philosophy in the vein of Ninja Gaiden where using style and flash seems to be the most important aspect of succeeding. I just don't care that much for it because it's just not my style, ironically enough. Flash and scoring just doesn't really impress me because it feels like more of an obstacle than the actual enemies you're supposed to be fighting; like the combo sequences are the real challenge and the enemies are an afterthought.

I did enjoy the original DMC though, and have fond memories of the first spider boss. I also played through the third "complete" edition but by that point I pretty much had my fill of that game style. By that point I was more into stuff like God of War and ultimately the Souls games.

True. Phoenixmgs said the combat is much deeper and more satisfying than in Souls, but I can't agree, as most of the time the enemies will just stand there while you chain your combos. Some of the bosses in the later Souls games are pretty ferocious.

Comparing a game like Bayonetta to a Souls game is a bit like comparing half pipe trick snowboarding to just going off the side of a mountain through the trees. I much prefer the latter, because it feels like the challenge itself is more direct and immediate in terms of just getting down the hill in one piece.

Mister K:
Every time I see this guy, he is complaining about something. Geez, maybe you should, I don't know, be less of a Negative Nancy, or something?

You said yourself that you don't like games like Devil May Cry, why bother with this one? I mean, I don't play RTS, I don't like RTS, I am not going to jump into Starcraft II and they say "man, this suckz".

It's kind of his thing. Why decide a genre of gaming just isn't for you when you can say that the entire thing just doesn't have any legitimacy?

OT: I haven't played the game, but isn't the point of these types of games to kill stuff in spectacular fashion? Seems to me like it's supposed to be mindless (maybe not the right terminology here since they're not really just button mashers), over-the-top, combat. Doing lots of combos is just going to be a lot more fun. Also, they're probably more necessary on higher difficulties. Plus, these are arcade style games, so if score isn't something that matters to you, you're kind of missing the point by the sounds of it.

Well, that's a pretty bait n' switch title. It's obviously not your cup of tea (at this point I'm not even sure if any game is), and I don't think your enjoyment will improve later in the game. Personally I use about 4 or 5 combos that allow me to either finish with a summon, have flurry of attacks or that end up stunning the enemies (welding pistols on the hands and shotguns on the feet)

I'm actually enjoying it. But I play on easy so there's no real need to memorize anything. I always play these games on easy the first time around. After that, if I feel like replaying I'll up the difficulty.

Sounds like you're falling into the trap of attempting to memorize broad combos first, without focusing on stringing basic yet safe input into a simple repeatable string. Once you master a few reliable combos you build onto that to form a string of attacks.

It's up to you to decide how to properly time that according to enemy attacks, enemy types, whether your output is for single targets or crowd control. Once you have a comfortable rhythm, you monitor the recovery times on your attacks, you push the limits of your execution by focusing on precise timing and clever use of animation cancelling.

What looks like an incomprehensible flurry of attacks at first, will become a carefully coordinated combo string that adapts according to enemy behavior, threat prioritization, attack prediction which leads into punishing enemies during their recovery times.

The "spectacle" is entirely on the player's ability to utilize the combat system to it's fullest extent. The emphasis is on finesse. These games engross the player on mechanical skill, challenging them to master the system and forge their own approach within the broad strokes of the weapons, styles and attack types involved.

Then again, you've admitted to preferring slow-paced combat systems (I enjoy both styles, yet decent fast-paced spectacle fighters that emphasize style seem to be a rarity.) so I'm not sure what you were expecting when going into a game like this.

Ezekiel:
Phoenixmgs said the combat is much deeper and more satisfying than in Souls, but I can't agree, as most of the time the enemies will just stand there while you chain your combos. Some of the bosses in the later Souls games are pretty ferocious.

The only thing stopping from forever stun-locking Souls enemies is your stamina. All the normal enemies in a Souls game are so easy, you face nothing but trash mobs hoping for a good boss fight. The only reason you die to normal enemies in a Souls game is because you know they are easy and take the fight for granted or aggro one too many of them. Gracious and Glorious in Bayonetta are actual challenges and probably only a select few Souls bosses would be considered harder than them. Also, even the lower level versions of that tandem that you can use witch time on will hit you the instant witch time is over. Yeah, you can make any enemy in Bayonetta look joke easy but it takes really good skill in the game to do that. Whereas in a Souls game, just be careful and you make every enemy joke easy, you don't even need but 2 buttons the whole time (dodge/block and 1 attack). Even doing something as basic as strafing breaks the 1st Dark Souls.

Phoenixmgs:
Gracious and Glorious in Bayonetta are actual challenges and probably only a select few Souls bosses would be considered harder than them.

So you admit Souls has harder bosses. Yeah, some of them have quite a lot of stamina and ferocity. Like Fume Knight and Pontiff Sulyvahn. I don't think Souls is the be-all, end-all of combat systems. I would prefer something with more alternate attack buttons, stances, speed and mobility. Also, a soft lock-on system and an HP system that doesn't kill you with two successive hits. But it beats spectacle fighters. Like I said, the opponents will just stand there. Like in a bad martial arts movie fight, in which the hero is surrounded by a whole mob of enemies, but only one or two will attack at a time, if at all.

Ezekiel:
Like I said, the opponents will just stand there. Like in a bad martial arts movie fight, in which the hero is surrounded by a whole mob of enemies, but only one or two will attack at a time, if at all.

The way these spectacle fighters are set up is that enemies won't attack you from off screen. So you can be surrounded by enemies, but the only ones that will attack you are the ones that you can directly see, in order to make it fair and give you the ability to dodge every attack.

If they didn't do that all of your complaints would be about how bullshit it is that you keep getting attacked by enemies you can't see.

I can't shake the feel of this being a bunch of people who have never played a videogame before judging videogames from the standards and expectations set by books and movies, only in game genre form.

All these things such as enemies not fighting back like in a corny movie and whatnot are intentionally there as part of a system intended to make for a really flashy and epic fight that transcends the limits of realistically possible feats. That's the core engagement. To respond about it not being realistic as though it ought to have been is to miss the point and to do so not from a position of ignorance is to be disingenuous.

Obviously Bayonetta is a cheesy and corny cool style of anime-like over the top thing and not a dark and dreary, heavy, realistic grime-fest. I don't get how you'd even expect it when the chars hair turns into dragons. (and yes, if it can turn into dragons, it can turn into zippers too!)

What the hell? Why are my used items still gone even after I forfeit and restart!?

Dirty Hipsters:

Ezekiel:
Like I said, the opponents will just stand there. Like in a bad martial arts movie fight, in which the hero is surrounded by a whole mob of enemies, but only one or two will attack at a time, if at all.

The way these spectacle fighters are set up is that enemies won't attack you from off screen. So you can be surrounded by enemies, but the only ones that will attack you are the ones that you can directly see, in order to make it fair and give you the ability to dodge every attack.

If they didn't do that all of your complaints would be about how bullshit it is that you keep getting attacked by enemies you can't see.

I'm talking about enemies who are on screen.

I use as many as possible, as often as possible.

Except for the launcher->midair or the jumpkick combos, because I just can't do them consistently enough in the heat of combat to make them practical.

Dreiko:
I can't shake the feel of this being a bunch of people who have never played a videogame before judging videogames from the standards and expectations set by books and movies, only in game genre form.

All these things such as enemies not fighting back like in a corny movie and whatnot are intentionally there as part of a system intended to make for a really flashy and epic fight that transcends the limits of realistically possible feats. That's the core engagement. To respond about it not being realistic as though it ought to have been is to miss the point and to do so not from a position of ignorance is to be disingenuous.

I don't remember complaining about the combat being unrealistic. I said it was fluff (shallow) and implied the spectacle is unengaging. I agree with Hansel on this. I want the challenge to be the combat itself, rather than the high score.

Obviously Bayonetta is a cheesy and corny cool style of anime-like over the top thing and not a dark and dreary, heavy, realistic grime-fest. I don't get how you'd even expect it when the chars hair turns into dragons. (and yes, if it can turn into dragons, it can turn into zippers too!)

But why would she need a zipper when her hair conforms to her whole body?

If my clothes could do that, I would never bother with zippers again. Zipper malfunctions can be a pain!

Ezekiel:
So you admit Souls has harder bosses. Yeah, some of them have quite a lot of stamina and ferocity. Like Fume Knight and Pontiff Sulyvahn. I don't think Souls is the be-all, end-all of combat systems. I would prefer something with more alternate attack buttons, stances, speed and mobility. Also, a soft lock-on system and an HP system that doesn't kill you with two successive hits. But it beats spectacle fighters. Like I said, the opponents will just stand there. Like in a bad martial arts movie fight, in which the hero is surrounded by a whole mob of enemies, but only one or two will attack at a time, if at all.

Like Dirty Hipsters mentioned, enemies won't attack you from off-screen. Bayonetta enemies are far more aggressive than Souls enemies. Bayonetta has harder "normal" enemies than several bosses from Souls. I only played the 1st Dark Souls and Bloodborne and both are OK-decent games, but the combat is just repetitive and boring outside of boss battles. The games basically throw a bunch of "busywork" at you to get to a potentially good fight. Then, you occasionally die to a normal enemy just because they are so easy you lose focus and that 1 out of 100 chances, you'll mess up. Sorta like how a shortstop will make an error on a routine grounder once in awhile. A lot of the boss fights are pretty easy in a Souls game as well; I made it through entire dungeons a good handful of times never dying blind on my only playthrough. I went in expecting a seriously challenging game when I played Dark Souls only to be extremely disappointed. Sure it doesn't hold your hand but the actual difficulty is even less than Uncharted from a skill perspective, the checkpoint system is the only thing that adds difficulty to the game. Put that checkpoint system in Uncharted, and Uncharted is instantly the harder game.

It is pretty ignorant to conclude the depth of any game's combat system when you don't really know the mechanics as you said you don't even know any combos let alone how to dodge offset. I love how Bayonetta trains you to "git gud" as well whereas a Souls game doesn't. There's literally no reason to riposte (outside of being really useful for the occasional boss) as it's far too risky when you have a set amount of health to get from bonfire to bonfire. Dodging or blocking are far better methods for losing the least amount of health. Whereas Bayonetta's dodge offset adds no risk and only rewards you. Bayonetta makes you use dodge offset slowly as more enemies immune to witch time are thrown at you as you go up through the difficulties.

Ezekiel:
I'm nearsighted. I hate wearing glasses. I pretty much only wear them when I go to the cinema or drive. They get dirty and foggy easily, they reflect light and you always feel them.

LMAO, I'm pretty nearsighted as well and I don't even have glasses. I can see what I need to and I even cheated on the driving eye test to pass. I've never been the cause of an accident (so I can just renew my license online) and I don't even look when changing lanes as I have my mirrors set up perfectly (overlapping and everything). Making out street signs is the only real issue I have but with Google Maps and navigation, you don't really need to make out street signs anymore.

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